The 13th Secutech Expo was bigger and better than ever, with more exhibitors, visitors and conferences. A strong turnout proved SecuTech to be the most high-caliber, dynamic and comprehensive security and safety platform in Asia.
 
Secutech Expo 2010 Provides Complete Solutions and Top-Notch Education
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Global Digital Surveillance Forum (GDSF) Highlights IP Video Trends
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CompoSec Breaks Down Components for Security Products
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Top Five Product Trends from Secutech Expo 2010: Part I
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Top Five Product Trends of Secutech Expo 2010: Part II
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Top Five Product Trends of Secutech Expo 2010: Part III
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Secutech Buyers Hunt for Quality Bargains:Middle East and North Africa
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Secutech Buyers Hunt for Quality Bargains:Southeast Asia
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Secutech Buyers Hunt for Quality Bargains:Latin America
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CompoSec Breaks Down Components for Security Products

CompoSec kicked off in 2009 as the world's only conference dedicated to key components in security, as components drive product innovation. CompoSec 2010 themes, targeting R&D decision makers, included HD Surveillance Technology, Video Compression and Processing Technology, and Intelligent Security Management.

Bob Ferrar, GM of the Low-Power Embedded Division for Intel, discussed the importance of processing for high-resolution video. "In 2013, more than 50 percent of cameras will have resolution of more than 1 megapixel," he said, forecasting that megapixel cameras will be mainstream in the security world by then.

Processing power was further explored by Jeremiah Golston, Da Vinci Chief Architect and Video CTO, Texas Instruments. "We give a lot of room for differentiation to our customers for this market to grow and provide value," he said. "Video analytics is really where the value's going to be and where customers want to differentiate.

"Sufficient processing power is required to run more sophisticated software. "Two years ago, we talked about having a touch screen for DVR users," said Tom Wang, Marketing Manager of ARM. "Our customers said they were nice to have but expensive. But human nature pushes the user interface going forward, so we're going to hear about 3-D coming."

HD
Image sensors are indispensable for capturing clear images. OmniVision and UFINE discussed breakthroughs in megapixel CMOS sensors, with sensitivity and low-light performance catching up to CCDs.

As higher-resolution images are harder to adjust for focus, they have special optical needs. The Seiko lens stepping motor allows for lens adjustments from a remote location, so users enjoy image clarity, said Hisashi Kawamoto, Senior Assistant Manager, Development Department, Opto Division, Seiko Precision.

HD video put s constraints on bandwidth, as images are significantly larger than standarddefinition footage. Gareth Heywood, Market Manager of Analog and Mixed-Signal Products for Gennum, discussed an HDcctv receiver for transmission, which offers the same installer experience with no networking needed.

Brainy Chips
Larger images place higher demands on processors. Tony Zhao, Technical Marketing Manager for Asia Pacific, Altera Semiconductor Technology Service, discussed FPGA performance for handling HD and wide-dynamic capability.

HD is now required for network cameras and video surveillance, said Bob Beachler, VP of Marketing, Operations and Systems Design, Stretch.

Video intelligence is being embedded in more processors; Sor Shen, CTO and President of Vatics, focused on SoCs with video content and audio analysis, which he expected to have higher uptake in the future.

Processors not only need to be smart, but they need to improve dynamic range performance, said Rogers Lee, Video Codec Architecture Officer for Grain Media. The company's SoC solutions are more efficient to save hard disk space.

Storage, Software and Biometrics
HD images take up more storage, with real-life challenges outlined by Ed Strong, Director of Marketing for AV Storage, Western Digital. Today's storage requirements include reliability, compact form factors and effective heat dissipation.

On the home front, Michael Feng, Senior Account Manager for the Taiwan OEM Embedded Group, Microsoft Corporation, discussed intelligent platforms in building and home automation. Microsoft is making Windows Embedded available for video analytics, biometrics and natural user interfaces.

Identifying someone can be done a accurately with finger vein recognition, said Steven Chen, Assistant Manager of ID Management Global Sales, Global Business Planning and Operations Division, Hitachi. In Japan, 81 percent of ATMs use vein recognition with smart cards, reducing fraudulent transactions.

Tony Tan, Director of the Identification and Security Technology Center in Taiwan, discussed embedded video analytics for edge video devices, such as network cameras, video servers and storage media.

Secutech Expo 2010 featured total security solutions and informative conferences. Despite a volcanic eruption disrupting European flights, visitor turnout grew, proving Secutech's significance for security and safety.