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Bosch launches new AMAX  intrusion alarm systems

Bosch launches new AMAX intrusion alarm systems

Editor / Provider: Bosch | Updated: 4/23/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Hybrid panels and wireless peripherals expand applications supported and improve performance
* Three intrusion alarm systems with 8, 32 and 64 zones
* Hybrid operation combines support of wired devices and the new RADION wireless family
* More flexibility and scalability allows customizable security for numerous applications

Munich – Bosch Security Systems completes its portfolio of intrusion alarm systems for residential and small to medium commercial applications with the launch of two new members of the AMAX family of control panels. This launch is further supported by the introduction of RADION, a new family of wireless peripherals. Private households as well as owners of SMBs (Small Medium Businesses) now have the flexibility to choose between wireless and wired detectors, thus protecting their assets with an individually configurable security solution.

Intrusion alarm systems for every purpose
Introduced in 2013, AMAX 4000 is now backed by two new intrusion control panels – AMAX 3000 and AMAX 2100. Together, the three solutions cover a three-step application range: AMAX 2100 is suitable for small applications with a maximum of 8 zones, AMAX 3000 is designed for facilities where 32 zones are required, and AMAX 4000 covers larger properties with up to 64 zones, for instance a medical center with several individual practices in the building. AMAX 3000 and 4000 can additionally be operated in hybrid mode, connecting wired detectors, such as Bosch Blue Line Gen2 Series, as well as wireless peripherals from the new RADION family. The compact AMAX 2100, running wired detectors only, completes the portfolio.

The new RADION wireless family includes motion detectors, surface and recessed mount door and window contacts, universal transmitter, keyfobs and smoke detector. This makes it suitable for new installations, as well as for use in existing installations thanks to compatibility with existing “DSRF” wireless systems and legacy control panels from Bosch. Furthermore, the RADION family offers another special feature: by using up to eight repeaters even remotely located detectors can be integrated in the AMAX alarm system, expanding system range up to 1,350 meters. In addition to numerous mechanical design features to improve the ease and reliability of installation, all RADION peripherals can be automatically enrolled within the intrusion system.

“The new AMAX family has a broad application spectrum covering nearly the complete European intrusion control panel market,” says Peter Hupka, product manager AMAX. “Bosch is thus further increasing the level of potential customization solutions, especially with AMAX 3000 and 4000. Their hybrid properties enable utilization of RADION wireless peripherals, reducing or eliminating the need for building work,” he explains further.

All three AMAX intrusion alarm systems, as well as the RADION family, are EN 50131 grade 2 certified. AMAX panels are available in eight language versions to suit diverse application needs. With 90 percent of the standard alarm situations pre-programed, they are also easy to install and operate. Alarm transmission uses a standard telephone landline (PSTN), while modules for additional transmission via IP and GSM/GPRS are available. Further, all AMAX intrusion alarm systems can be remotely controlled with programming software for PC and used for fire detection by integrating smoke detectors.

The complete AMAX and RADION family will be available in Europe, the Middle East and Africa from April 2014 onward.

Senstar launches FlexZone: new ranging fence-mounted sensor

Senstar launches FlexZone: new ranging fence-mounted sensor

Editor / Provider: Senstar | Updated: 4/21/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Senstar, the well-known manufacturer of perimeter intrusion detection systems (PIDS) has launched FlexZone, a new state-of-the-art ranging fence-mounted sensor. With three meter location accuracy, FlexZone enables flexible zoning through software.

Compared to non-ranging systems, FlexZone reports remarkably fewer nuisance alarms while maintaining a high probability of detection. It can detect and localize multiple simultaneous intrusions and provides many features that speed installation time.

Stewart Dewar, Product Manager at Senstar commented: “When designing FlexZone we considered the needs of both end users and installers.”

End users demand better performance when securing their critical sites, but want to reduce their total installed cost. To achieve this objective FlexZone supports 600m (1,968 feet) of sensor cable per processor, creates zones through software, and carries power and data on the sensor cable – dramatically reducing the costs of supporting infrastructure for large sites. In addition for small sites FlexZone can provide a “one box” solution with up to 4 zones reported by local relays

Installers want a speedy risk-free installation process and FlexZone delivers this with numerous ease-of-use features such as pre-installed openings with cable glands, convenient USB connection for setup, and a single software setup tool for all phases of the installation

“I am confident that the market will soon recognize the benefits of FlexZone, and see the result of our 33 years of experience fully manifested in this new product,” said Dewar.

[GDSF Secutech 2014] Digitalcom shares experience in Thai Customs Dept.

[GDSF Secutech 2014] Digitalcom shares experience in Thai Customs Dept.

Editor / Provider: William Pao, a&s International | Updated: 4/18/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Digitalcom, a participant in GDSF at Secutech 2014, shared its experience in helping the Thai Customs Department set up a state-of-the-art surveillance system aiming to strengthen border control.

The project began in 2008 and is now in its third phase. The main installation was done by the Communication Authority of Thailand, which rents the system to the customs agency on a yearly basis. Hardware and cameras were provided by Yip In Tsoi, and Digitalcom did the system configuration.

The main purpose of the project was to monitor activities at the borders and make sure that no trafficking of any kind took place. Border control gained importance especially after the Thai government raised its tobacco tax this year, an event that caused trafficking of cigarettes from neighboring countries to rise, said Suwich Chitkasemsuk, MD of Digitalcom.

The installation involved the deployment of over 200 recording servers and over 1,500 cameras. According to Chitkasemsuk, installation was made much easier thanks to Milestone's solution, which allowed Digitalcom workers to use Windows Remote Desktop and Management Client to complete installation and configuration, all at one central site.

To free up more bandwidth needed for high-quality video data, the multi-stream technology was adopted. Digitalcom uses MJPEG for recording videos from important cameras and MPEG-4, which requires lesser bandwidth, for viewing purposes, Chitkasemsuk said.

The company's solution also integrates with various existing technologies, such as facial recognition and analytics, to detect intrusion, reduce false alarms, and enhance responsiveness.

[GDSF Secutech 2014] VMS works wonders for verticals

[GDSF Secutech 2014] VMS works wonders for verticals

Editor / Provider: William Pao, a&s International | Updated: 4/18/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

VMS is demanded by any vertical market that needs video surveillance to keep facilities and premises safe and secure. Operators from different verticals, however, look for different things in their VMS based on the specific demands and needs of their respective industries. The topics of VMS and its applications in different vertical markets took the center stage during this year's Secutech Taipei and were a main theme discussed by panelists in the Global Digital Security Forum (GDSF) held alongside the exhibition. During the event, industry experts shared their insights into VMS requirements for different verticals and what they considered to be good video management software.

Airports/Public transportation
Scalability is one of the first things operators of airports and public transportation facilities look for in choosing the right VMS solution. As the number of cameras increases with the construction of new airport terminals or new subway stations, the ability of VMS to grow with the system becomes critical.

“When we first did the Taipei subway system, we had 1,000-plus cameras and 17 stations, but the numbers have increased to more than 10,000 cameras and more than 100 stations,” said Isabella Lin, Sales Manager of Overseas Sales Division, Instek Digital, which was chosen as a partner of the Taipei Rapid Transit Corp. to deploy video surveillance solutions. “Scalability has become an essential thing.”

Reliability, or the ability of a system to maintain stable, steady operation even in the event of system failure, is also crucial. Every piece of video is vital in accident prevention or post-event investigation and is too precious to be lost during any time. Management software that enables continuous system access and uninterrupted video streaming is therefore another important factor that airport and public transportation operators look for.

Finally, video management software nowadays must include a certain level of intelligence, which analyzes abnormalities in videos and responds to those abnormalities accordingly. When someone intrudes into an off-limits area or loiters on the subway platform, a solution with good analytics will detect those scenarios and send an alert to the security personnel. This way, tragedies may be prevented, and lives saved.


“Analytics is becoming a lot more mature, and we're seeing new applications,” said Justin Schorn, Co-Founder of Aimetis, which has deployed VMS solutions in major international airports in the world, including those of Brasilia, Munich, and Perth. “With no analytics, a solution is a very much passive, not a very reactive one. But with analytics, it's more of a proactive product.”

Safe city
Surveillance plays a critical function in keeping cities safe, livable and responsive to crime, terrorist threats and attacks, accidents and disasters. According to a previously released whitepaper, Milestone, a leading VMS provider, said after a city in Brazil installed a video surveillance system, it noticed a 6 percent reduction in crime. A Nevada police department installed cameras in a high crime area, and within a year research showed that 52.7 percent of the residents felt there was less drug dealing in the area and 77 percent felt that the surveillance system had enhanced their quality of life.

“A safe city project aims to protect citizens and assets. It involves technologies providing situational awareness to various stakeholders, and enables overall operational picture to all relevant agencies,” said Sunny Kong, Director of Sales of Asia, Milestone.

Yet meeting those objectives entails more than installing a bunch of cameras on street lamps or traffic signals. It also has to do with monitoring a gargantuan amount of video footage and identifying people, objects or behaviors that are suspicious. Again, this is where analytics comes in, said Wilson Chin, Marketing Vice President, Verint Asia Pacific.

“It's not so much about (the solution) identifying a license plate. It's more about recognizing that the license plate is supposed to be assigned to a white Honda minivan, and now it's on a black four-door sedan Toyota. That's an alert that someone has switched the license plate,” he said. “As the analytics gets more sophisticated, that's when its value in a big city solution becomes apparent.”

Chin also mentioned the importance of open web monitoring in a safe city solution, which relies on the collective wisdom of the people to identify suspicious individuals or fight crime.

“For those of you who followed the Boston Marathon incident a couple of years ago, you know that one of the ways they tracked down the individuals was analyzing thousands of thousands of photos taken by people through their smartphones,” he said. “It wasn't just the monitoring points of the cameras that was deployed by the city. It was people with smartphones. They would put things on Facebook or Twitter, which greatly expanded the number of images available for analysis. This is the power of crowdsourcing.”

To enable that kind of connectivity between citizens and government agencies through smart devices, an enabler is needed, and according to Milestone's Kong, that enabler is the open platform.

"An open platform enables the use of best-in-breeds in technologies,” he said. “It allows freedom of choice, future-proofs investments, and ensures third-party integrations easily."

Banking
No vertical needs security more than the banking industry, which processes a tremendous amount of money on a daily basis. Yet a surveillance installation can get complex and sophisticated when it comes to banks, which operate different sites including corporate buildings, branch offices, ATMs and cash depots. Monitoring these sites to ensure that they are always safe has thus become a priority for security operators.

“The main purpose for a bank in having a video surveillance system is two-fold,” said Jukka Riivari, CEO of Mirasys, which has done business with five out of the top 50 banks across the world, four out of the top six Nordic Banks in Europe, and three central banks. “One fold is to make sure that the premises are intact; there is no intrusion to the premises after the office hours or during the office hours. The other is how can you reduce the false alarm rate so you only have real alarms.”

To manage videos from different locations the VMS must have strong centralization features that can, for example, alert local authorities on irregular banking activities at a specific branch office. Intelligence must also be included in the video management software to reduce false alarms. A complex alarm list, for instance, may be built into the system to make sure that people suspected of intrusion or loitering match the criteria on the alarm list.

At the same time, banking VMS should be able to interface with other technologies, for example access control, intrusion alarms and transactional systems, to prevent and reduce fraud and other financial-reduced crimes. According to a survey conducted by the European ATM Security Team, ATM card skimming resulted in losses of nearly 111 million Euros across Europe during the first half of 2011. Meanwhile, a study released in 2011 by the Aite Group estimates that card fraud costs the U.S. card payments industry US$8.6 billion annually. Against this backdrop, VMS integrated with transactional systems allows instant revelation of transaction irregularities that may result from card skimming.

“It's the specific solutions, not just the DVRs and cameras, that keep the hundreds of branch offices safe,” Riivari said. “You need to be able to detect someone trying to put a skimming device into the system. That is the purpose of one of those solutions needed, not just tools.

Safe and sound
While VMS works differently across verticals, experts at GDSF all reached the consensus that VMS should allow scalability, reliability, integration and intelligence no matter which vertical it is deployed in. These requirements help ensure normal and safe business operations, which are ultimately needed for the end user's sustainable growth.

Tyco discloses expanded security Global Center of Excellence

Tyco discloses expanded security Global Center of Excellence

Editor / Provider: Tyco | Updated: 4/17/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Tyco announced the expansion of its Global Center of Excellence (GCoE) in Birmingham, Alabama, that enables multinational companies to streamline and standardize their security systems around the world. The GCoE develops standards, technical specifications and detailed work plans that enable consistent security installations globally, while also providing customers with remote system audit services to verify functionality and compliance to corporate standards.

With the increasing number of global clients supported by the GCoE, the expansion of the center will allow Tyco to better serve clients with a single point of contact for their global security needs. Fortune 500 customers are seeking to streamline and standardize their global integrated security systems by consolidating the number of local system integrators they work with worldwide. Managing multiple integrators across hundreds of locations can lead to operational redundancies, quality degradation, compliance issues, and increased costs. The center will also play a key role in the company's effort to create comprehensive solutions for customers that encompass a range of building systems.

"Integrating systems and technologies to solve customers' problems is at the heart of our future, and this center brings us a step closer to that vision," said George Oliver, Tyco's Chief Executive Officer. "We are driving toward bringing not only security systems, but also fire and other building systems together on a common platform to provide customers with unprecedented insight and control over their operations."

"The Global Center of Excellence offers a lot of value to our customers by providing a single point of contact for all global security needs, saving time and resources while allowing access to multiple competencies in a centralized location," said Renae Leary, Vice President of Global Accounts at Tyco. "As companies are driving out costs and consolidating real estate and operating expenses, many are now realizing the huge benefits that come with standardizing on IP-based security solutions and partnering with a global integrator. This alignment delivers consistent execution of technology in terms of quality, timeliness and most importantly a higher standard of security to protect their people and assets."

The new 24,000 square foot facility currently houses 90 employees, including certified design engineers, computer-aided design operators, program managers, system engineers and other specialists, who design and document global security standards for enterprise-level intrusion security, access control, video management, fire systems and integration. The GCoE's diverse team has multiple competencies, including fluency in 14 languages, and is well-versed in the business and cultural nuances required to successfully conduct business in the 38 countries the center supports, so customer standards and technical specifications can be maintained and updated as needed.

The new facility is located at 1800 International Park Drive in Birmingham, Alabama.

Vicon introduces Mike Hallford as Regional Sales Manager of Georgia and Carolina

Vicon introduces Mike Hallford as Regional Sales Manager of Georgia and Carolina

Editor / Provider: Vicon | Updated: 4/16/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Vicon is pleased to introduce Mike Hallford, Vicon's new Regional Sales Manager for Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Mike is a 30 year veteran in the Electronic Security Industry working for such companies as United Technologies Corp., GE, Johnson Controls, and Siemens. Mike has familiarity working with a full range of security professionals including architects, consulting engineers, national and regional systems integrators and end-users. Mike is well versed working with Enterprise Networks, Access Control, Fire, Fiber Optics, and Intrusion products.

Axis to showcase new video surveillance at Counter Terror Expo

Axis to showcase new video surveillance at Counter Terror Expo

Editor / Provider: Axis Communications | Updated: 4/10/2014 | Article type: Security 50

As well as showcasing its latest network video innovations at the international security trade show, Axis will be joined by Digital Barriers, which specialises in advanced surveillance technologies to the international domestic security and defence markets.

Axis will be exhibiting at stand E45 at the event at the Olympia in London. At the Axis booth, visitors will get the chance to explore the benefits of network video solutions for any public infrastructure surveillance application, especially around the following areas:

* Efficient protection of people and property
* Reduced vandalism and crime
* Enhancement of the city's image
* Improved traffic monitoring.

Atul Rajput, regional director, northern Europe, Axis Communications, said: “The secret to success in the world of video surveillance is to create an environment where everyone can perform at their best while feeling safe and secure.

“Network video offers countless possibilities for infrastructure operators to integrate security, safety and production control in one system; a system that allows supervision of all processes, video surveillance, intrusion protection and access control to remote sites, several locations and, if needed, into one centrally-located control room and even on a smartphone!

“At the event, we hope to demonstrate to our guests that regardless of what other technologies are being used, the network camera should always be the starting point when planning and designing the surveillance and protection of critical infrastructure.”

Dave Oliver, director UK enterprise account sales at Digital Barriers, added: “We are very excited to be launching our SafeZone-edge embedded intrusion detection system at Counter Terror Expo. It combines performance, simplicity, resilience and affordability. It has been certified under the Home Office's i-LIDS scheme as a primary detection system for operational alert use in sterile zone monitoring applications. It provides a compelling new argument for Axis camera installers and operators to embed analytics at the edge of the network.”

Amongst others, Axis will be exhibiting the following products:
* AXIS P5414-E PTZ Dome Network Camera – Intelligent direct drive PTZ dome with HDTV 720p
* AXIS P8514 Network Camera - Eye-level covertly mounted HDTV camera
* AXIS P3384-VE Network Camera – Outdoor, vandal resistant HDTV fixed dome with outstanding video quality in demanding light conditions
* AXIS P1204 Network Camera – Miniature HDTV pinhole camera for discreet surveillance
* AXIS Q6045-S PTZ Dome Network Camera – Pressurised, stainless steel PTZ dome with HDTV 1080p

 

Increasing adoption of situational awareness systems in critical infrastructure

Increasing adoption of situational awareness systems in critical infrastructure

Editor / Provider: Michelle Chu, a&s international | Updated: 4/8/2014 | Article type: Infrastructure

Situational awareness has become a leading consideration in the protection of critical infrastructures, particularly for sites that want to conduct higher risk management and decrease the damage caused by potential threats. According to a market research report by MarketsandMarkets, the global security market for situational awareness systems — ranging from access control; physical security information management (PSIM) software; human-machine interface (HMI); video systems; and chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) defense systems — is expected to generate revenue of US$168.3 billion by 2020, growing at an estimated CAGR of 10.1 percent from 2013 to 2020. Every critical site demands a different level of integration, mostly dependent on the possible challenges and threats.

Ranging from natural conditions to social demonstrations, critical infrastructures need to be prepared for whatever may jeopardize the security of their sites. Critical infrastructures often cover a vast area and contain hazardous substances, making them an even bigger challenge to protect. If a critical site is not properly secured, any attack could possibly lead to hazardous consequences. In order to be able to instantly respond to a threatening incident, the solution has to allow operators to deploy every subsystem in the site through the same centralized management platform. More importantly, the centralized management platform should be able to communicate with both new and legacy systems. To answer the unique requirements of the critical infrastructure sector, many situational awareness systems, particularly PSIM solutions, have been strongly promoted in this market.

ADOPTION OF PSIM
During the last few years, adoption of PSIM solutions has dramatically increased in the critical infrastructure sector. As an emerging segment, the PSIM market is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 25.8 percent from 2013 to 2019, due to the decreasing prices and increasing awareness among end users, according to Transparency Market Research. “It can be said that by pure volume, PSIM software may still be in the innovation phase of adoption, which is around 2.5 percent of all available customers; on the other hand, there are some indicators that suggest that PSIM software adopting has moved into an early adoption phase, which is around 13.5 percent of customers,” said Joshua Phillips, Director of Marketing of Enterprise and Critical Infrastructure of Video Intelligence Solutions at Verint Systems.

PSIM solutions are being increasingly used in government applications, such as law enforcement agencies, the military, ports, airports, transit systems, civilian agencies, and corporations with critical infrastructure assets. For instance, the city of Baltimore, U.S., has used PSIM to link assets and creat interoperability between around 50 agencies for large-scale public events. While, the new World Trade Center complex in New York City, U.S., has decided to use PSIM software as part of the ground-up solution for security and building management systems, according to Darren Chalmers-Stevens, VP of EMEA at VidSys.

PSIM: TOTAL INTEGRATION PLATFORM
PSIM solutions seem to be the answer to the demand of centralized management systems, offering efficient threat-response procedures. PSIM software provides organizations with a seamless interface, integrating security systems, building management, and on-site facilities and subsystems that enable operators to deploy every device when required. Furthermore, PSIM software is able to integrate systems — such as perimeter, intrusion/motion detection, video surveillance, access control, fire alarm, mass notification systems, audio, gas detection, radio communication, Internet, IT, and building automation — both legacy and new, making them interoperable on the same interface and workable with supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems.

Pre-Programmed Course of Responses
In addition to enhancing centralized management, PSIM software can proactively protect critical sites from potential threats and minimize damage with a series of coordinated and predetermined responses. “A PSIM solution allows organizations responsible for critical infrastructure protection (CIP) to take a proactive approach to security by implementing measures supported by resilient business processes for identifying, investigating, responding to, and recovering from a range of security threats,” stated Keith Bloodworth, CEO of CNL Software. “The pre-programmed response is done by tailoring the solution to manage the standard operating procedures as dictated by the plant or facility and by building an effective network of communications with external systems, and in an emergency, this may prevent a disaster turning into a tragedy with massive impact.” Once the system is aware of danger or an abnormal event around the site, the PSIM software will send out notifications to related individuals, and suggest a series of tailored operating procedures.

As an open software platform, PSIM software is able to integrate analog and IP-based devices and systems, aggregate information from all facilities, communicate among integrated systems, and then provide real-time alarm and event verification, as well as prioritize emergency response, which can ease labor intensive operations and increase efficiency, as Chalmers-Stevens explained. For instance, if an alarm is triggered by a sensor or motion detector somewhere on the site, corresponding live surveillance images from around the location will then be automatically presented to an operator in the security center. In the mean time, the geospatial location will be sent to the PSIM system, which then identifies the incident site on a map and responds to the threat accordingly. Since the threat-response procedures are all pre-programmed, any operator on that shift would know exactly how to deal with the problem.

REMINDERS BEFORE CHOOSING PSIM SOFTWARE FOR CIP
PSIM software is used for situation management; however, it has become harder to satisfy end users' requirements from various verticals, as this software is mostly focused on security and overlooks specific demands from different sectors. For example, “In areas subject to flooding and landslides, the cost-benefit of the pluviometer [rain gauge] integration far outweighs the value many PSIM solutions provide by integrating to the standard players in the security area,” Phillips pointed out. “The critical infrastructure customer finds it more affordable to replace one or more of the existing video systems than to wait for a PSIM provider to adapt to their environment.”

Despite the fact that PSIM software can provide critical infrastructures with a totally integrated platform, there are still some challenges that PSIM vendors have to contend with. One problem is reaching a consensus on total integration between all the departments in an organization, especially the IT and security teams. Since different departments have different security concerns, some might be nervous about sharing access to a database and servers on a centralized platform for example, according to Chalmers-Stevens.

In addition, critical infrastructure is a competitive sector in the security market, especially since required solutions and security management platforms can be provided by not only PSIM companies but many other VMS companies as well. A PSIM solution can be far above most end users' budgets — critical infrastructures usually have a higher budget for hardware, but software products are not always given the same consideration, according to Bloodworth. In order to deploy similar integration and management systems, end users must sometimes make compromises, opting for other affordable solutions and products that offer them acceptable and alike functionality.

FINAL WORDS
Even though past obstacles remain as issue, PSIM software manufacturers continue to pay attention to the education of end users in critical infrastructures every year. PSIM software, as an example here, demonstrates how important it is for critical infrastructures to improve their total security via situational awareness systems and the benefits they can get from the systems. It could be expected that, in addition to PSIM solutions, the adoption of situational awareness systems will peak significantly in the coming years.

Critical infrastructure aspires for comprehensive protection

Critical infrastructure aspires for comprehensive protection

Editor / Provider: Michelle Chu, a&s International | Updated: 4/8/2014 | Article type: Infrastructure

The critical infrastructure sector has been regarded as one of the most important sectors in terms of national security around the world since it is highly vulnerable to terrorist threats. There were about 2,500 attacks on critical infrastructures around the world that can be linked to terrorist organizations from 1996 to 2006, according to a report by Electric Power Research Institute. To prevent possible disastrous consequences, governments usually adopt various high-tech security products that come with better risk management systems and also higher prices. It is forecast that the global infrastructure market will grow from US$63.7 billion in 2013 to $105.9 billion in 2018, at a CAGR of 10.7 percent, by MarketsandMarkets. North America will remain as the market with the most revenue, whereas the markets in Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa are expected to experience greater market traction.

MAJOR SECURITY THREATS TO CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURES
Critical infrastructures have always been one of the most prominent security focuses of national security. Critical infrastructures refer to several essential and fundamental facilities, interdependent systems, and assets that support a country's politics, economy, transportation, security, energy, health, education, communication, etc. — to put it simply, it has a huge impact on the public's daily activities. For instance, if any power plant is damaged, it can jeopardize a country's security and lead to unimaginable public consequences and inconveniences, as it can take several weeks to months for total site functionality to be restored.

Critical infrastructures are mainly threatened by terrorism, vandalism, intrusion, and espionage, and are often considered a major target of anti-government actions. These critical sites should also be protected from industrial accidents and natural disasters which will instantly endanger the public once they occur. If a dam, for instance, is sabotaged, the damage may cause insufficient water resources, flood control failure, agriculture irrigation failure, and even disable electricity from being generated around that area, or worse, across the country. If a power grid is attacked, the damage may lead to chemical leaks and cause further destruction.

An example of this is the power grid attack in California last April, which has recently been disclosed as an act of domestic terrorism, in which 17 transformers were fired at by unknown snipers for 19 minutes. The attackers had cut the fiber optic telecommunication cables in an underground vault near the site before entering the site and shooting at the oil-filled cooling systems of the transformers, causing massive oil leaks and the transformers to overheat. Fortunately, the damage was controlled; however, it still took 27 days for the facility and the damaged transformers to be repaired — each transformer can cost millions of dollars to build, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal.

KEY CHALLENGES IN CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION
A power grid is usually set up with multiple buildings, assets, and facilities, spread over a vast geographical area. Critical infrastructures generally invest in various technologies over time, resulting in the wide adoption of legacy and new devices, according to Darren Chalmers-Stevens, VP of EMEA at VidSys. Regarding overall size, number of buildings, and vast system deployments, managing a power grid in an organized manner is the primary challenge of protecting critical infrastructures. In order to efficiently and conveniently manage the entire energy station across multiple locations, it is crucial for critical infrastructures to centralize operations and increase situational awareness on both physical and logical threats through greater system integration.

MULTI-LAYERED PERIMETER DETECTION AT THE FRONT LINE
Risk management of critical infrastructures could be a great challenge to a site operating manager, due to complex deployment of disparate systems, devices, and facilities within a vast area. Critical infrastructures tend to favor multi-layered perimeter systems, which are able to comprehensively prevent various threats, like vandalism, trespassing, terrorist acts, and etc.

It is forecast that the global market size for electronic perimeter security sensors and video in electrical utilities and oil refineries will top $160 million in 2014, despite the economic slowdown in 2011 and 2012. This strong growth is resulting from the trend of using remote video and networked sensors in order to remotely configure and conduct devices from a distant location, according to a report by IMS Research, an IHS company.

For energy grids, any security threat or attack might lead to catastrophic results, which is exactly why managers are prone to using multi-layered perimeter detection systems.

A nuclear site is the perfect candidate for a multi-layered perimeter system. “A common architecture for nuclear power stations and other high security sites is an initial layer of a volumetric-tall sensor (4m to 6m high) with very high possibility of detecion; once an alert is generated, the intruder has to penetrate a fence which would delay the intruder for a few minutes to move on, even if the intruder is well equipped,” suggested by Hagai Katz, Senior VP of Marketing and Business Development at Magal Security Systems.

"Behind the layer, there is typically a clear space of about 10-meters wide; it is an area always kept clear, facilitating ease of verification, be it by cameras or another detection layer, such as microwave sensors, buried volumetric cables, or even IR detectors. And finally there is a second fence for further delay, which may be equipped with a smart fence mounted sensor.”

Integration of Video Surveillance and Intrusion Systems
In perimeter security, it is crucial to properly integrate video surveillance with intrusion systems. If individuals or vehicles intend to breach a critical site, the intruder will trigger the perimeter sensors. The system will then immediately send out a security notification to the command center with a corresponding image from the camera at the particular site so operators will know how to respond.

“Without integration between video surveillance and intrusion systems, it would be difficult to maintain a high level of awareness when a sensor detects a break-in — it would be time consuming for a security operator to find the appropriate video footage of an event,” Joshua Phillips, Director of Marketing of Enterprise and Critical Infrastructure of Video Intelligence Solutions at Verint Systems stated.

There could be up to hundreds of surveillance cameras installed at the site of an energy grid to make sure that the entire area is completely covered. As the front line of a critical infrastructure site, a perimeter system especially requires constant monitoring with surveillance devices, in order to have the site comprehensively controlled.

However, for the security guard and operator, it is almost impossible to continuously concentrate on watching every camera during their shift, not to mention identifying the correct on-site camera and location right when the security alarm goes off. Adopting video analytics not only helps the operator to prevent an intrusion or attack, more importantly, it makes sure that the guards and operators will not miss any suspicious actions. “Upon motion detection or other abnormalities detected, security operators can get a geospatial location on the targeted suspect and immediately dispatch a response,” Phillips mentioned. Physical motion detection can help security operators spot threats effectively even in harsh external conditions and weather.

A TOTAL INTEGRATION PLATFORM
A common goal, when it comes to critical infrastructure protection, is the ability for security guards and operators to identify and respond to threats in the shortest time possible. In order to immediately and efficiently react to possible threats on site for large-scale operations, it is crucial to have a central management system with an open platform to allow for integration between different security measures and subsystems.

Besides, security systems like video surveillance, access control, and perimeter security, a total management integration platform should be able to connect effortlessly with other major systems. These systems include IT, fire and smoke detection, alarm, extinguishing, telephone, radio communication, and building automation that might be in the critical sites. These systems should be easily integrated through a single platform, regardless if they are new or legacy products and devices.

This total integration platform can make sure that any operator is able to manage all systems on site whenever a natural disaster, unexpected incident, or attack occurs. “The integration of video surveillance, access control, intrusion alarm, and fire detection is an ongoing and growing phenomenon which requires a tailor-made approach on behalf of the vendors and integrators, as some of the systems, such as access control, are quite old, but still operable,” said Aluisio Figueiredo, COO of Intelligent Security Systems.

Providing a safety and security solution that integrates different systems into a single, multi-modal, administrative solution is not just about merging equipment, devices, and systems — it is about putting into place a solution to support clearly defined working routines whilst ensuring rapid, compliant, and efficient response to emergency situations along with the mandatory, post-incident reporting analysis, according to Siemens Building Technologies.

CONCLUSION
Security deployment in a critical site is never an easy task, as there are many obstacles and concerns, such as environment, budget, and consensus among every department, which will affect the final security procurement in a critical infrastructure. Despite the challenges, the security market in the critical infrastructure sector is still full of opportunities for providers due to its importance in national security and safety.

Hungarian Spa in Hajduszoboszlo upgrades surveillance solutions with VIVOTEK

Hungarian Spa in Hajduszoboszlo upgrades surveillance solutions with VIVOTEK

Editor / Provider: VIVOTEK | Updated: 3/31/2014 | Article type: Commercial Markets

Hajduszoboszlo, a small town in Hungary, has been well known for its thermal spring with a healing power since 1920s. HungaroSpa, located in Hajduszoboszlo, offers to international tourists a variety of facilities, such as medical spas, open-air baths, aqua parks, and an aqua-palace. In order to create a safer, more comfortable and reliable environment for tourist, in January, 2013, the management hired Satrax, a system integrator in Hungary working with VIVOTEK and VIVOTEK local distributor Alphasonic, to upgrade the surveillance system at HungaroSpa by installing 173 VIVOTEK network cameras.

Solution
For the center of the swimming pool (a 50 m X 50 m area), VIVOTEK's innovative and award-winning Panoramic PTZ solution was installed. Incorporating VIVOTEK's latest 5-Megapixel fisheye fixed dome network cameras and latest launched full HD speed dome network camera, the solution provides a 180° panoramic view or 360° surround view without blind spots, making it an especially ideal solution for monitoring open areas like the swimming pool and its surroundings. Panoramic PTZ offers wide coverage and can be used to monitor elderly tourists and emergency situations.

In addition to Panoramic PTZ, a variety of other cameras were implemented. Specifically, IP8332 was installed at entrances, outdoor swimming pools, and indoor spa pools because of its day & night function, weather-proof casing, and tamper detection features. IP8335H cameras, which feature an HD WDR CMOS sensor for use in challenging lighting conditions, were installed in outdoor swimming pools, which also open at night. IP7361 cameras were installed for outdoor swimming pools, entrances, and spa pools in the block. IP7361 is a high-end 2-megapixel network bullet camera with high resolution and a combination of outdoor specific features such as concealed wiring to prevent tampering. Additionally, the auto-iris capability can protect the lens from damage induced by direct sunlight.

FD8136 were installed for entrances and exits. As the world's smallest network fixed dome camera, FD8136 features a megapixel sensor enabling viewing resolution of 1280x800 at 30 fps. FD8134, an easy-to-use fixed dome network camera specifically designed for indoor security applications, were installed in the entrances to indoor dressing room (ceiling is about 2.6 m). IP8131 cameras were installed for the control center room, where 2 operators monitor the whole scene all time. IP8131 is a compact cube camera designed for indoor surveillance. Activities around the control center room, such as intrusion or vandalism, can be monitored. With supporting VIVOTEK's iViewer, the smart phone application, operators can monitor live video off-site.

The spa was equipped with several analog cameras. However, as the requirement for security increased, a more advanced and comprehensive network surveillance system is necessary. VIVOTEK's video server VS8100 was therefore adopted to connect to existed analog cameras, which the client wished to continue using. VS8100 was used to upgrade analog into digital surveillance system. Additionally, VAST, the central management software, was also implemented. It was designed to support hundreds of cameras and stations in a hierarchical structure of system for monitoring, recording, playback, and event trigger management with ease-of-use and efficient control.

Benefits
Steve Ma, VIVOTEK's Executive VP commented, "We are proud to present an innovative panoramic PTZ to our clients. The entire surveillance network made possible by the advanced cameras and servers developed by our R&D team will guarantee 100% high-quality images for the spa management. We hope tourists from all around the world will be able to have safe and enjoyable vacations in the VIVOTEK-equipped environment."

 

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