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CEM integrated access control and biometric for new Polish museum

CEM integrated access control and biometric for new Polish museum

Editor / Provider: CEM | Updated: 1/30/2015 | Article type: Security 50

CEM Systems, part of the Security Products business unit of Tyco, announced that they have secured the new Silesian Museum in Katowice, Southern Poland. The AC2000 access control and security management system was delivered by CEM Approved Reseller Samaxon, and installed by IB Systems & Budimex.

The stunning new Silesian Museum houses 109,000 items from different fields of art, as well as archaeological, ethnographic and historical artefacts. The new museum building, opening mid 2015, has all of the Museum's exhibition space buried underground with only glass tower skylight extensions visible above.

“As an organization with a large number of important works of art and other artefacts of historical importance, security is obviously of paramount importance for The Silesian Museum. CEM AC2000 access control system was chosen because of its proven security and reliability in addition to its flexibility to integrate to third party security systems” said Philip Verner, EMEA Sales Director, CEM Systems. “Integration is an important part of the Museums' overall security strategy, requiring their existing intruder and CCTV security systems to work seamlessly with the access control system.”

CEM Systems worked together with Samaxon to develop a software interface between CEM AC2000 and Avigilon video management system and used the AC2000 Galaxy Dimension Interface to integrate with the Honeywell Galaxy intrusion detection system.

The AC2000 Galaxy interface enables inputs from intruder panels to be placed as icons on the AC2000 AED (Alarm Event Display) application allowing for central alarm monitoring of both access control and intruder alarms. AC2000 AED provides the Museum with a powerful security management tool and provides a central command and control user interface for the access control, video and intruder systems. AC2000 AED also provides the Silesian Museum with dynamic, real-time information on all alarms and events that occur on the AC2000 system.

AC2000 comes with a range of comprehensive software applications that can enable the Silesian Museum to enhance business operations. The Museum will utilize AC2000 VIPPS (Visual Imaging Pass Production) and AC2000 Visitors. AC2000 VIPPS gives museum security personnel the ability to design and customize ID badges and AC2000 Visitors enables staff to monitor and control visitor access to the prestigious building. Visitors can be given access levels and/ or traced, allowing visitor movements to be monitored and controlled. Visitor cards can then be reused when returned, saving on visitor card costs.

The Silesian Museum has also installed CEM S610f integrated fingerprint card readers at high security doors throughout the building. This additional layer of biometric security allows for triple authentication — card, PIN and fingerprint — for highly restricted areas that require extra security.

Stepping into new trends: Video surveillance in 2015

Stepping into new trends: Video surveillance in 2015

Editor / Provider: Eifeh Strom, a&s International | Updated: 1/30/2015 | Article type: Hot Topics

A new year brings new trends. Many of the trends from 2014 have since turned into industry standards, such as HD resolution and IP surveillance; however, new ones have emerged to keep the security industry on its toes in 2015.

The Market at a Glance
In 2014, video surveillance accounted for approximately 53% of the total market share (US$13.5 billion) in terms of global physical security product sales, according to Memoori Business Intelligence. Double-digit growth has been the norm in the video surveillance market over the last decade, and analysts at IHS forecast similar growth in the new year, predicting more than 10% growth in 2015. Furthermore, Marketsandmarkets has predicted that the global video surveillance market will reach roughly $42.1 billion at a CAGR of 17% for the period 2014 to 2020, with the IP system market expected to grow at a CAGR of 23.5% during the same period. Rising crime rates, an increase in terror attacks, and growing security concerns all are contributing to this growth.

Who Reigns Supreme? IP vs. Analog
The move to IP is no longer so much a trend as it is simple fact: New installations are going IP and many analog users are upgrading to network-based solutions. With that said, does that mean that IP has finally taken over analog in video surveillance? The answer is yes and no. In terms of revenue, IP sales have surpassed analog sales; however, in terms of quantity, analog shipments still outnumber those of IP. This is poised to change, with analysts believing that IP shipments will take over analog by the end of the decade. Evidence of this shift can be seen in markets like Latin America where the overall market — one that is heavily focused on analog — is now leaning toward IP equipment for the first time (by supplier revenue), according to a report by IHS.

Asia Leads the Way
In the world of security, Asia has had a tendency to be a step behind when it comes to the most up-to-date technologies. In the coming years, though, APAC is forecast to be the fasting growing region for IP video surveillance globally at a CAGR of 44.3% during the period 2013 to 2020, according to a report by Allied Market Research. The report also pointed out that North America is expected to experience the highest share in the IP video surveillance market by 2020, predicting that the continent would be the highest revenuegenerating segment with a value of about $19 billion in 2020. However, China is estimated to have been the largest regional market for video surveillance equipment, accounting for a third of global revenues in 2013.

Trends for the Growing Market
Along with growth come trends, trends that help drive growth and keep the market up-to-date with new and exciting technologies. In 2014, we saw IP surveillance become a norm and HD resolution become a standard. In the following, a&s explores a few of what we expect to be the most popular video surveillance trends for 2015.

High Efficiency Video Coding (H.265) One of the most important developments for 2015 will be that of high efficiency video coding (HVEC), also known as H.265, which directly relates to another trend: 4K resolution. HVEC will play a significant role in the feasibility of 4K in security applications. According to security experts, about 90% of surveillance products currently use HVEC's predecessor H.264 for compression. However, that is set to change. “Our outlook is that most future advancements in the market will focus on compression, as the megapixel market has evolved extremely quickly and the compression will need to advance nearly as quickly to meet the growing demand for higher resolution images. H.265 may be the answer to this as there is a tremendous amount of computational power required for the compression and decompression of these images that the industry is currently grappling with,” said Stephen Carney, Director of Video Product Line Management at Tyco Security Products.

Pervasive use of H.265 has many implications for the security industry. With the ability to double the data compression ratio compared to H.264 at the same level of video quality, H.265 will greatly improve the usability of 4K in security applications. In fact, both Hisilicon and Ambarella introduced IP camera SoCs based on H.265 at the end of 2014 and widespread use of H.265 is expected within the security industry by the second quarter of 2015. This will in no doubt directly impact the adoption of 4K.

Finding Applications for 4K
The entrance of 4K resolution into the security industry was met with both curiosity and excitement. Similar to how HD was expected to be the new standard for image resolution when it was first introduced into the industry (which it since has become), many believe that 4K ultra-high definition (UHD) will eventually replace HD as the standard, and the availability of H.265 in security will be a catalyst to this; however, this change will not happen overnight. “4K will certainly be a trend to watch, though broad adoption will be problematic for the security industry at this point due to limitations on current camera form factor/lens combination, bandwidth, and storage constraints and the cost of the equipment versus the benefits or necessity of the additional resolution gained with the technology,” Carney said.

Despite the current limitations, many of the obstacles should soon be resolved. Aside from H.265 helping with data compression, the rapid rollout of 4G across the globe should assist in dealing with bandwidth problems, as well as better, improved accompanying hardware (e.g., lenses, monitors, etc.).

Bigger, Better Image Sensors
With the trend of 4K in 2015, along with the fact that HD has become the standard, bigger, better sensors are now needed to support such high-quality images. The trend toward increased value of total image quality will utilize large image sensors, the latest iris system, and high picture quality at near IR, said Koji Maunari, GM of the Industrial Optics Business Unit at Tamron. In fact, the image sensor market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 8%  from 2014 to 2020, according to a recent report by Marketsandmarkets. Not only are manufacturers coming out with bigger sensors, they are also adding special technologies to further enhance image quality, specifically designed for video surveillance use. Well-known sensor makers such as Aptina, Omivision, and Pixelplus are now pushing out larger image sensors, while companies such as Sony have come out with new sensor technology specifically addressing the needs of the video surveillance market. The new Starvis technology, a back-illuminated pixel technology used in CMOS sensors specifically designed for video surveillance, was released by Sony in mid-2014. The technology extends from the visible light range to include the near-infrared range to support filming at night, which is often a problem area for 24/7 outdoor surveillance in most CMOS cameras. The improved performance at night will help more extensive adoption of CMOS cameras in the near future. Additionally 4K sensors are also being developed. These new sensors can support up to 12 megapixels (4:3) and 4K (17:9), and even support 4K at up to 60 frames per second. Furthermore, with sensors now reaching 1/1.9 inches, even higher resolution and clearer images are possible.

HD-over-Coax Gets More Advanced
HD-over-coaxial solutions are not new to the security industry. In fact, IMS Research, an IHS company, named HD-over-coaxial solutions a trend for 2012; however, at that time the solution in question was more or less limited to HD-SDI, which turned out to be not nearly as cost-effective as the security industry had initially hoped. Yet, like with any technologies a little time has yielded new-and-improved solutions, and 2014 saw just that with the introduction of new HD-over-coaxial solutions. One of the major proponents of HD-over-coax is Dahua Technology, who came out with their HDCVI technology in late 2012. However, it is not until more recently, in the last year, that the industry has really seen HD-over-coaxial solutions take off, with many other companies coming up with their own technologies and solutions as well, such as AHD, ccHDtv, and HDTVI. HD-SDI has also evolved: The new generation has upgraded in long-distance transmission, and more importantly, has become more cost effective.

Despite the fact that the overall market is going digital, many definitely still see plenty of room for HD-over-coaxial solutions, noting acceptance of the technologies particularly in developing regions such as Asia Pacific and Latin America.

Renewed Life in Intelligent Video Solutions Intelligent functions have been touted for a while in security, but it isn't until more recently that they have been widely incorporated and desired in video surveillance. In fact, as of recent, a certain degree of analytics on the edge has become a standard feature for most IP cameras. From entry-level to high-end, cameras can now be differentiated by how “smart” they are. As part of this, video surveillance has proved capable of not just recording and reviewing, but preventing and analyzing. “The IP revolution has changed the surveillance cameras from a forensic tool aimed at solving problems after an incident has occurred to becoming a vital part of proactive intelligence chain. Network video cameras collect valuable data that can be analyzed and turned into actionable insights,” said Johan Paulsson, CTO of Axis Communications.

The idea of actionable intelligence is one reason intelligent video solutions are seeing an up surge in demand. “We [Verint] believe that actionable intelligence presents an opportunity for customer to implement solutions that enhance security and safety, while reducing operating costs and increasing productivity and efficiency,” said Brian Matthews, VP of Global Marketing and Product Development for Video and Situation Intelligence Solutions at Verint Systems.

Another reason demand is growing is due to more developed technology. “Advancements in analytics should also not be ignored, as this segment of the market has progressed to where analytics are accepted as reliable, accurate, and part of the day-to-day operations of a large percentage of users. Some analytics, such as facial recognition, will definitely benefit from the higher resolution images and increasing levels of clarity as camera technology continues to progress,” Carney said.

The many benefits that intelligence brings to video surveillance, especially now that the technology is more reliable, are being realized across verticals. Certain verticals like retail have found particular use for intelligent video, where the data is being used for business intelligence. “Especially video content analysis solutions like Bosch's that do not only automatically trigger alarms on the basis of pre-defined alarm rules, but also enable the tracking of objects,” said Erika Gorge, Corporate Communications Manager at Bosch Security Systems. “This kind of intelligence can also be used to obtain information that goes beyond a pure security purpose such as marketing intelligence information on the scenes being under surveillance — for example number of people (people counting), movement of people, registering characteristics like color or crowd density information.”

Furthermore, we will also see a higher adoption of big data for multiple applications, such as smart cities, in 2015, where a smart surveillance camera with advanced VCA could definitely play an important role. We will see how VCA changes a surveillance camera into a content provider for big data.

There is a catch, though: Avigilon's recent acquisition of ObjectVideo's entire patent portfolio and licensing program. In the future, Avigilon will replace ObjectVideo as the patent holder to lead the future development of VCA technology, once again reshuffling the intelligence market. The impact this move will have on the security industry as a whole will be massive, and not necessarily in a good way — Avigilon now holds 124 US and international patents and 202 US and international patent applications as a result.

Integrated Systems Become a Must
In the past, integration of disparate systems has been a struggle for many users. With newer solutions, the ability to integrate is in high demand, and as such integration has become a focus for many security players.

“Integration has been talked about a long time — but as a user experience it has been less than ideal. You will soon see systems that deliver on that promise of a seamless user experience,” said David Gottlieb, Director of Global Marketing Communications at Honeywell Security. William Ku, VP of the Brand Business Division at VIVOTEK echoed confidence in the integration trend: “The full integration of disparate systems, including video surveillance, intrusion systems, perimeter detection, access control, and real-time intelligent analysis on data will be the trend in managing security in every vertical application since the security could be secured seamlessly and enable staff to respond to intrusion or threats in a short time and solve the events on-site in an effective way.”

The trend for more integrated systems is also what will help push IP growth forward, as the IP market has matured and entered into the late growth stage of its product life cycle. Yet, the low-end market still has significant potential for IP growth, as noted by Karl Erik Traberg, Head of Corporate Communications and Business Development at Milestone Systems.

In the middle and high-end markets, however, the trend for more integrated systems will continue to drive IP growth. “In the market for advanced solutions with high camera counts there is a significant opportunity to offer more advanced integrations with access control and other security applications,” he added. “Verint believes in and has realized increased demand for innovative, integrated solutions that combine situation management, communications, and cyber intelligence, and facilitate collaboration across security and law enforcement agencies. We believe that today's government organizations, institutions, and multinational corporations, in connection with safe city, border control, transportation security, critical infrastructure, and other large-scale security initiatives, are interested in and preparing to deploy unified security solutions that fuse data from a wide range of security systems and intelligence sources to enable efficient information correlation and analysis,” Matthews said.

Hope for 2015
A lot of major changes took place in 2014 that has in a way left a question mark hanging over the fate of the security industry — the Canon Europe acquisition of Milestone Systems, Anixter acquisition of Tri-Ed, and most recently the selling of Samsung Techwin to Hanwha Group. Yet, one thing is for certain: there will always be a need for security and video surveillance. This sentiment is what industry players are emphasizing when it comes to future growth of the security/ surveillance market. Development for the overall market may not be as rapid as it once was, but with the above trends helping to drive surveillance growth, as well as the continued growth of things like video surveillance as a service and cloud computing, there is definitely still upward hope for the future of video surveillance.

Tyco and Somfy join home IoT alliance Thread Group

Tyco and Somfy join home IoT alliance Thread Group

Editor / Provider: Tyco | Updated: 1/29/2015 | Article type: Security 50

The Thread Group announced the addition of Somfy, the leader in home control products, and Tyco, the largest fire protection and security solutions company, to its Board of Directors. Thread is the new IP-based low-power wireless mesh networking protocol designed specifically for the home and the Thread Group is an industry alliance chartered with guiding the widespread adoption of Thread.

The Thread Group now includes more than 80 member companies and nine board members, making it one of the fastest-growing alliances focused on the Internet of Things in the home.

“Somfy and Tyco are world leaders in home comfort and safety and their active roles in the Thread Group speaks volumes about Thread's potential,” said Chris Boross, president of the Thread Group and technical product marketing manager, Nest. “The two companies' deep understanding of what consumers care about most in their homes will be an asset for the Thread Group as we continue to grow and define the connected home.”

In their new sponsor-level roles, Somfy and Tyco join Thread's seven founding members – ARM, Big Ass Fans, Freescale Semiconductor, Nest Labs, Samsung Electronics, Silicon Labs and Yale Security – in their goal of establishing the widespread adoption of Thread technology in the connected home.

“At Somfy, we view joining the Thread Group's board of directors as a great step forward in bringing safe, energy-saving solutions to people all over the world,” said Jean-Philippe Demaël, chairman of Somfy's board. “Collaborating with the Thread Group members will enhance our ability to transform the living environment, and we believe that Thread will emerge as a leading technology within the connected home.”

“The work of the Thread Group is closely aligned with our own business strategy and we are pleased to participate as a sponsor as well as a board member,” said Tim Myers, Intrusion director of product management, Tyco Security Products. “We have long been a supporter and active participant in a wide range of technology initiatives and alliances and we recognize the endeavors of the Thread Group in leveraging the best of existing proven open standards for unified IoT adoption.”

As sponsor-level members, Somfy and Tyco can initiate and lead working groups, and will have approval rights over operating budgets and final deliverables.

Thread Innovation Enabler Program
Thread has launched the Thread Innovation Enabler Program, aimed at providing innovative companies with the opportunity to join the Thread Group and to play a role in defining the connected home through access to Thread technology. Each quarter, the Innovation Enabler Program will provide one promising company with up to 18 months of complimentary contributor-level membership to enable them to build new products using Thread. Companies will be selected for the program based on the creative potential of the ideas that they submit to the Thread Group.

Protected against harsh environments

Protected against harsh environments

Editor / Provider: William Pao, a&s International | Updated: 1/27/2015 | Article type: Tech Corner

When it's pouring outside, or the temperature hits -10 degrees, you want to make sure your surveillance equipment is still working properly. Nowadays, equipment for critical environments — those that are subject to water, dust, winds, sand, salt, or extreme climatic patterns — is built with durability in mind and can effectively withstand harsh conditions. This way, users can rest assured that their products will work normally no matter how tough the surroundings get.

Surveillance equipment isn't just for homes or offices. Sometimes, it is founded in some of the harshest and most unrelenting places in order to keep premises safe and secure. Whether it's set up on a maritime oil drilling platform or somewhere in the Middle East where summer temperatures may easily hit 50 degrees Celsius, equipment must be hardened and ruggedized to be able to perform smoothly and provide maximal safety for users.

International Standards
To help users understand whether certain products are suitable for certain conditions, several international standards have been formulated to indicate how effectively they can work in environments prone to water, dust, explosions, and impact. Some of these standards are listed below.

IP
IP or ingress protection ratings specify how capable equipment can withstand the ingress, or entry, of foreign solids or water. An IP denotation is usually consisted of two numerals, with the first indicating the protection of equipment against solid foreign bodies and the second indicating protection against water. For critical environment equipment, it should be rated IP66 to IP68 as opposed to IP32 to IP54 for indoor settings. A similar rating system, published by National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA), specifies protection of electronic equipment against external ice, corrosive materials, and oil immersion in addition to dust and water.

Hazardous Areas
Hazardous locations are specified under different rating systems around the world. For critical environment equipment, it should be able to work well in areas designated as Class 1 Division 2 Group A or B in North America, or as Gas Group IIC in Europe. Both indicate places where easily flammable gases and vapors, such as hydrogen and acetylene, are present.

IK
The IK rating system is used to denote protection of equipment against impact produced by either a natural disaster or vandalism. It ranges from IK00, or no protection, to IK10, or protection against 20-joule impact, equivalent to the impact of a 5-kilogram mass dropped from 400 millimeters above impacted surface.

Others
Winds are categorized by their speed on the so-called Beaufort Scale. Equipment in critical environments should resist winds of up 61.2 meters per second, or No. 17 on the scale.

This is in contrast to typical equipment that only needs to work well in 41.4 meters-per-second winds, or No. 13 on the scale. Meanwhile, given temperatures often get extremely high or low in critical environments, equipment must be able to withstand these conditions. While typical equipment should have a working temperature range from -10 to 60 degrees Celsius, critical environment products should be able to work in a range between -40 and 70 degrees Celsius. For special equipment in factories monitoring boilers or furnaces, it must be able to withstand high temperatures from 300 to 1,000 degrees Celsius.

Hardened and Ruggedized
When security equipment is installed in critical areas for whatever purpose it's designed for — video surveillance, access control, or intrusion detection — it must be toughened to weather adverse conditions. Special technologies or materials, for example epoxy resin, polyamide, and aluminum alloys, are used to make the products work well in regions or vertical markets that call for hardened, ruggedized equipment.

Video Surveillance
Cameras are needed not just in commercial or residential settings but also in places that are subject to danger or extreme weather conditions. “There's high customer demand for rugged, environmental performance,” said Craig Dahlman, Director of IP Camera Products at Pelco by Schneider Electric.

“Rugged, fortified systems are needed to protect delicate and valuable camera and optics packages.” To meet that demand, Pelco by Schneider Electric has manufactured a series of products that are able to withstand explosions, water and dust ingression, fog, high and low temperatures, winds of up to 57 meters per second, and corrosion by salt and different types of chemicals.

Various cutting-edge technologies have been adopted to make those features possible. For example, certain products feature the pressurized integrated optics cartridge (IOC) technology, which protects the equipment from moisture and airborne contaminants and packages an auto-focus camera, lens, heater, and sensors in a small, self-contained, and sealed unit. Dry nitrogen pressurized to 10 pounds per square inch gauge (PSIG) protects the environment inside the cartridge, whereby sensors strategically placed in the cartridge send an alert message if changes in pressure, temperature, or humidity are beyond factory-set acceptable limits.

Certain models also feature heater, window defroster, sun shroud, and thermal insulation blanket to enable operation in temperature conditions ranging from as low as -46 degrees Celsius to over 49. In the event of a power failure during an ice storm, the entire unit can deice itself and become operational in just two hours after regaining power at a temperature as low as -25 degrees Celsius.

“Video security and surveillance is a mission-critical application … and there is a global demand for these products, particularly in hot dry areas, cold wet areas, marine environments, and humid environments,” Dahlman said.

Illumination products supplement video cameras by providing the necessary lighting and are sometimes placed in critical environments as well. “Housed in marine grade aluminum with a toughened glass window … our critical environment products have a wide operating temperature range from -52 degrees Celsius to 55. Our thermal management system achieves up to 60 percent better heat dissipation than other LED luminaires with a significantly cooler operating temperature,” said Barry Thompson, Head of Hazardous Area Division at Raytec.

These features make Raytec lighting products ideal for a variety of verticals and regions. “We are currently delivering illumination in a vast number of challenging and remote applications across the globe, such as oil fields in Kuwait and Dubai, oil pipelines in North Africa, and offshore platforms in UK and various Middle East regions,” Thompson said.

Access Control
No stringent requirements are demanded of access control readers for commercial or residential applications. But when placed on the outside or in a critical environment, that's a different story.

“The reader has to withstand torrential rain in an outdoor installation,” said Tom Su, Sales Manager at Hundure Technology, which is set to release an IP66 reader. “Plus, it has to be durable enough to be able to work properly in the long term in a harsh environment and withstand human-made damage.”

Materials play an important part in toughening the products. Hundure, for example, uses as a main ingredient epoxy resin, which is an excellent electrical insulator and protects electrical components from short circuiting, dust, and moisture. “We have epoxy inside the reader to make it totally waterproof for outdoor installations,” Su said. Potting, or the filling of a complete electronic assembly with a solid or gelatinous compound for resistance to shock, vibration, moisture, and corrosive agents, is also used during the manufacturing process. “We use potting material for the majority of our readers, which seal them from any kind of water penetration,” said Steven Katanas, Director of Sales for Australia and New Zealand at HID Global. “Potting completely encases all electronics and stands up well to many harsh outdoor environments. An outer case might get beat up a bit, but the inner electronics are durable.”

The other critical element in an access control system, namely the cards, should not be overlooked, either. “Some cards use more durable materials than others. For instance, a line of our smart cards use an ABS shell construction for durability in harsh environments, and can be used in diverse applications including physical access control, PC logon, biometric authentication, time and attendance, cashless vending, public transportation, airline ticketing, and customer loyalty programs,” Katanas said.

Perimeter Intrusion Detection
Perimeter intrusion detection systems (PIDSs) are almost always placed on the outside of important premises such as airports, power plants, and certain government facilities. Sometimes equipment is deployed at places with highly intensive electromagnetic waves, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) may occur. PIDSs with EMI-resistant capabilities are therefore a plus. “One of our perimeter security taut-wire products was installed around a Radio Free Europe site, which transmits one megawatt power of short wave radio using curtain array antenna. These are extreme RF condition,” said Hagai Katz, Senior VP Marketing and DB at Magal Security Systems. “The most demanding conditions were for sections of the fence, which happen to reside right below the antennas' feeders, absorbing very high radio frequency radiation. In spite of all, the system has managed to perform perfectly.”

Heavy winds are also a threat to equipment or products placed on the outside, and manufacturers have different ways to overcome that. For example, Navtech Radar, which makes radar-based PIDSs, puts all the moving parts inside wind-resistant enclosures. “Normally if you have a rotating part exposed to the wind, then the wind pushes on that rotating part, moving it in a way you don't want it to move,” said Philip Avery, MD of Navtech Radar. “All our rotating parts are inside an enclosure. There is a plastic radome that protects the rotating parts from the wind and other elements.”

Any fixings — connectors, screws, and others — that hold the radar together should also be protected. Navtech Radar, for example, is considering putting plastic coating on the connectors to protect them from corrosion, which may occur at heavily corrosive environments like road tunnels.

“Different parts of the radar are bolted together using screws, and the last thing you want is to have those screws heavily corroded so the radar will fall apart,” Avery said. “You need to make sure that not only the main body of your system is made of the right material, but the fixings that hold it together are also made of the right material.”

Door Phones/Intercom/PA
Placed at the entries of residences, door phones should be able to adapt to various local climatic conditions. “Our products are used in high-temperature regions such as the Middle East and Africa, and also used in low-temperature areas like Russia or Scandinavian countries,” said Yoshi Nishiyama, who works for the international sales department of Aiphone. “Regarding the materials, we use environmental friendly materials complying with WEEE & RoHS. And the plastic materials we use are self-extinguishing materials against fire. All the metal materials for door phone units are designed against vandalism, and they have protection against water, sunlight, acids, and so on.”

For intercom and PA manufacturer Zenitel, it chooses polyamide as the material for making its industrial-grade PA call panels and intercom stations.

“Initially, our PA system was designed for the oil and gas industry and marine vessels. Polyamide is resistant to corrosion, so it's suitable for marine environments. Also that material is quite strong so it can withstand impact,” said Piet De Vriendt, Commercial Product Manager for Vingtor-Stentofon at Zenitel. “Fewer and fewer companies are making intercom stations out of metal for industrial applications, as new technologies have improved for polyamide, which is also better for corrosion and chemical resistance.”

Thing to Look for During Installation
For critical environment installations, a rule of thumb is to get products that are rated for conditions worse than where the equipment is being installed. “At the very least, users should make sure they are not installing equipment that is rated for a temperature- and humidity-controlled environment into an area where there will be considerable heat and moisture fluctuation,” HID's Katanas said.

Integrators should also help clients build an infrastructure that presumes and prepares for changes in the future, including ensuring durable performance in harsh environments. “This requires a platform that is dynamic, open, and adaptable, and that ensures security is independent of hardware and media so that organizations can evolve their infrastructure to meet tomorrow's needs,” he said.

With security products becoming increasingly network-centric, how to protect the network infrastructure in critical areas is also important. Some countries or regions even have rules about how IP-based equipment should be installed.

“The Middle East has requirements for transmission equipment that can tolerate very high temperatures. In India we have the same requirements, and in both markets high winds, dust, and sand are an issue, which the transmission equipment must also be able to withstand,” said Sara Bullock, Business Development Director at AMG Systems, adding her company has devoted much R&D efforts on heat reduction.“Our products carry many interfaces within the same box, which dramatically reduces the equipment required at the remote position, which in turn reduces heat within the cabinets,” she said. “A critical factor is airflow. Our products have ventilation slots on the casing, and as long as they are mounted in the correct way, they allow airflow to be forced up through the units.”

Zenitel's De Vriendt stressed the importance of collaborating with someone who is strong at IP setup in harsh conditions. “The most important advice we can give to integrators and installers is to have good cooperation with the consultants who specify the system and to work with companies that have experience with setting up IP networks in these environments,” he said.

Built With Durability
Today's surveillance equipment is built with durability in mind, able to resist various harsh environments to satisfy users' needs. With an understanding in these products, and knowledge on how they should be set up properly, users can have full assurance that their surveillance systems will run smoothly in the midst of inclement conditions.

Banks cash in on integrated, scalable systems

Banks cash in on integrated, scalable systems

Editor / Provider: Israel Gogol, Freelancer, a&s International | Updated: 1/27/2015 | Article type: Commercial Markets

In recent years the most talked-about security threats to banks have been cybercrimes and fraud. Though it seems that traditional security systems are no longer in the spotlight; banks still make substantial investment in their physical security systems. Changes in the design and layout of banks as well as banks' desire to make the most out of their installed systems have great impact on the design and implementation of current security systems.

Banks hold the great responsibility of keeping our money safe. Even though most of this money is now in the form of electronic bits and bytes, banks are still one of the first associations when we think of security and surveillance systems.

Banks usually balance the mix of their security systems between discrete and unobtrusive systems such as emergency buttons and small hidden cameras (e.g., at the counter area or an ATM pinhole camera) and more visible measures such as guards and larger cameras. The visible security systems serve a double purpose, both deterring potential violators as well as giving customers a feeling the bank is indeed a safe place to keep their money. Surveillance systems installed in banks will usually combine several cameras with different functionality. Outside the bank infrared cameras will provide day and night monitoring. Inside the branch, dome and bullet cameras are used for lobby and counter monitoring for clear picture capturing and forensic evidence. The main purpose of these cameras is to prevent illegal intrusion by unauthorized people as well as monitoring the office environment to prevent property loss.

CHALLENGES OF THE BANKING VERTICAL
A major obstacle facing security companies and systems integrators is aligning the security needs of individual branch locations with the requirements outlined by the corporate headquarters. “Securing the bank branches themselves is different from securing a corporate headquarters or data center location, as branches are more often the targets for criminals since it's assumed that's where the money is located,” explained Matt Frowert, Director of Marketing for Financial Services at Tyco Integrated Security. Therefore, the standard level of security and defense are more in-depth at a branch than for a corporate office. Many times legacy systems, or different versions of the same platform, may be found in different regional branches of the same institution within a country, which makes centralized management difficult. In addition, there may be internal resistance to changes or upgrades that the corporate standards demand due to funding constraints, or the local staff being inexperienced and lacking training regarding proper security measures and systems. Another challenge may simply be a matter of timing and scheduling; implementing major technology upgrades across very large financial institutions with many branches and offices.

NEW BANK LAYOUTS
In recent years banks have been changing their traditional set-up to be more appealing to customers. There are more “light” branches located inside shopping malls and supermarkets. Traditional branch layout and design have also changed and now include more open floor plans and fewer staff which are tasked with broader responsibilities. “More in-branch automation and systems found in these new types of banks very likely means that they may not have the same levels of cash that traditional branches have,” added Frowert. “During a robbery attempt, the suspect may be confused when he discovers there is limited teller cash and no safe like there would be in a traditional bank set-up. These new frameworks for bank branches will affect the security of the customers themselves and the bank's security model for protection,” he explained.

As a result, emphasis is placed on new systems that offer increased ATM protection through anti-skimming technology, access control, and proper lighting measures for ATM vestibules to help ensure customers are properly protected.

BENEFITS OF INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR BANKS
Like any other enterprise, banks require their systems provide security, safety, efficiency, and cost saving. “Normally, powerful VMS software can integrate four systems, such as video monitors, access control, alarm systems, and the intercom system, which are used to communicate with bank clients at other locations, for example using an ATM at a different site,” said Nathan Chen, Solution and Product Manager at Dahua Technology. In turn, each system includes several components: alarm systems for example will include fire alarms, seismic sensors to detect if someone is digging into the bank, and emergency buttons. Access control systems will combine card readers, biometrics, magnetic door sensors, etc. This provides banks with an integrated solution instead of four stand-alone systems. In addition, sensors such as smoke detectors or temperature sensors are now built in the cameras and can send alarms directly to the DVR system. This way the bank can benefit from having several sensors on one platform and cut costs.

Systems integration is also critical for protection against insider threats by employees which can be very costly. “An increasingly popular step in mitigating insider threats through an integrated security system includes linking access control to identity management,” explained Frowert. By integrating these systems, financial institutions can restrict employee access to sensitive areas, track entry/exit times by employee or department, and use a log correlation engine or security information and event management (SIEM) system to log, monitor, and audit employee actions. By monitoring these types of systems, managers may notice individual employees trying to access part of the building they are not authorized for, which is activity they can then flag and subsequently continue to monitor the employee's behavior for other activity that might lead to an insider incident.

HYBRID DVRs AND NVRs
Hybrid DVRs and NVRs allow the integration of both existing analog cameras and newer IP cameras. The use of hybrid DVRs and NVRs can therefore help banks make the most out of their existing legacy systems and give them the flexibility they need in adding more cameras or testing new cameras and technologies.

“Our customers are interested in how they can protect their investments in legacy infrastructure while also taking advantage of the benefits of newer technology. There is an increasing move towards new NVRs because they can prolong the use of video surveillance systems as well as provide enhanced features to end users,” iterated Stefano Torri, European Sales Director of March Networks (an Infinova Company). These provide both analog and IP camera support and allow organizations to test and deploy IP cameras selectively, alongside existing analog cameras. “Banks are thinking about the broader benefits of the technology they use, so for example, NVR technology provides advances in video compression and storage management compared to earlier DVRs, and the use of H.264 compression, optimized to limit video signal noise, makes images clearer while reducing the use of bandwidth and storage. These things are important if a bank wants to tag video based on user-defined criteria, such as motion detection, transaction events, or alarms. Software that delivers intelligence and analytics is also a growing trend amongst banks and financial institutions,” he added.

ANALYTICS
An example of an analytics function used in banks is loitering detection, detecting for instance when a person lingers around an ATM machine. If such an event is detected, security personnel can then access the video recording in real-time and make a decision if further action is needed. Analytics can also provide information on customer behaviors (e.g., people counting, queue monitoring) which can be shared across the organization to improve not only security surveillance but also customer service and marketing. For example banks can analyze dwell and wait time at branches and change branch staffing appropriately to make sure there are enough tellers to service the waiting clients.

Apart from connecting the different systems in the branches, banks can also share information between locations. This feature has been gaining traction and makes security more comprehensive. Intelligent video applications allow an internal investigator to track fraudulent transactions and alert branches. “For example, entering a stolen card number into the system will deliver brief video clips of every associated transaction from anywhere across the entire retail banking network,” explained Torri. Not only can security managers easily export this information to branch managers, but they can also present it as integrated case evidence to the police.

KEYLESS ENTRY
Apart from using video analytics, banks are using intrusion detection and keyless entry to improve security measures and increase cost effectiveness. Replacing or re-keying traditional locks can cost a bank up to US$3 million in just one year. To mitigate the risks and costs associated with using traditional keys, banks are implementing new, wireless locks which work with inexpensive access cards to open entry doors. These new technologies also provide audit friendly reporting for the activities of any individual or of a specific entry point in the branch.

OPPORTUNITIES IN BANKING
Banks are relatively conservative players in the security market usually waiting to implement tried and tested solutions. Due to their large scale and many sites, frequent changes of security systems are not likely. Therefore solutions that help banks take advantage of their existing systems, integrate several functionalities together, and introduce newer technologies will be the choice for the banking vertical.

5 Tips for a Successful Security Installation in Banking
Matt Frowert, Director of Marketing for Financial Services at Tyco Integrated Security, provided the following five tips for banks when deploying a security surveillance system.

  1. Find an experienced integrator who specializes in bank physical security. 
  2.  Look for a partner who can support everything from single bank branches all the way up to money center banking models (banks who deal with governments, large corporations, and other banks).
  3. Network with security affinity groups of industry organizations, like the American Bankers Association, to receive recommendations on vendors from other banks in your area.
  4. Standardize on leading access, video, and intrusion systems supported by vendors that have a track record of investing in technology. 
  5. Invest in communication with and training of banking staff to enable them to effectively use the systems (e.g., arming the alarms at the branch level, managing the distribution of codes at the branch level, etc.).

TOP10 most popular security products in 2014

TOP10 most popular security products in 2014

Editor / Provider: Michelle Chu | Updated: 1/22/2015 | Article type: Hot Topics

      Happy New Year!  :)

asmag.com has been presenting TOP10 popular products of the month for a year, and, so far, it is one of the hottest Features on the site – thanks for all of your support all along! At the very beginning of 2015, we'd like to walk through 2014 once more and give you the TOP10 popular products in 2014.

 

Looking back to last year, more than half of the most popular products are no strangers to our readers. We have two cube cameras from Hikvision, which had received an incredible attention through the H1 in 2014; two key components from Nextchip; a smart door lock from Samsung; a set of control panel device from DSC:

Hikvision DS-2CD2412F-I (W) 1.3MP IR Cube Camera 
Nextchip AHD 
Hikvision DS-2CD2432F-I (W) 3MP IR Cube Camera 
Nextchip NVP1914 Video Decoder 
Samsung SHS-P718 Push Pull Smart Door Lock 
DSC PowerSeries Neo HS2-Series Control Panel

Besides, we have more products for access control, intrusion detection, and key components:

COMMAX CDV-35A Video Door Phone
Nextchip NVP1918 Video Decoder
Chuango CG-B11 Dual Networks Alarm System
Sony Exmor CMOS Sensor

To conclude, according to the click frequency* of each product during 2014, Hikvision and Nextchip are the biggest winners in last year, taking two seats in this annual ranking respectively. Overall speaking, the click frequency in total is mostly contributed by the readers in American sector and Asian countries, by 40.37% and 30.77% respectively. A similar tendency can be seen for most of the products listed. However, above all, several products have also successfully drawn the attention of Europeans: two cube cameras from Hikvision, an alarm system from Chuango, and a control panel set from DSC are all having people around the world carried away!

 

* Please note that the above statistics are not based on the sum of clicks but the accumulation of IP addresses.

>>>Top10 rankings for Novemver 2014

Bosch expands energy and building technology business with Climatec acquisition

Bosch expands energy and building technology business with Climatec acquisition

Editor / Provider: Bosch | Updated: 1/15/2015 | Article type: Security 50

Farmington Hills, MI - Robert Bosch North America Corporation has acquired Climatec, LLC, a leading provider of energy efficiency, building automation, security and life-safety solutions for the U.S. market. Headquartered in Phoenix, AZ, Climatec, LLC generated sales of 170 million dollars (128 million euros) in 2013. According to preliminary figures, Climatec increased its sales in 2014 to about 190 million dollars (143 million euros). The company employs some 670 associates at a total of twelve offices across Arizona, California, Nevada and Texas. Climatec has been majority-owned by Pegasus Capital Advisors, L.P. since April 2012. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

“With the addition of Climatec, we are expanding our global presence especially in the growing North American market, strengthening our portfolio and becoming a comprehensive supplier of solutions in the area of energy, building automation and security services,” said Dr. Stefan Hartung, member of the Bosch board of management responsible for the Energy and Building Technology business sector. “The entrepreneurial spirit, industry expertise, customer focus and shared cultural values that have made Climatec successful are an excellent match for Bosch. Our heating, energy service, security systems, software, sensors and storage technology expertise, combined with the Climatec portfolio, positions Bosch to achieve Energy and Building Technology business sector sales of ten billion dollars (eight billion euros) in 2020.”

“Over its 40-year history, Climatec has established itself as a trusted provider of building comfort, safety and efficiency solutions across nearly all building segments. I was immediately impressed by Bosch's determination to create an environment that would preserve our business model and customer focus,” said Terry Keenen, president, Climatec, LLC. “I am confident that this acquisition will strengthen our position for sustained growth, benefitting our customers and employees.”

Integrated competencies for a growing market
The market for integrated energy services, building automation systems and system integration is growing significantly in the U.S. and around the world. As global energy needs have doubled over the last four decades, customer demand for energy efficiency has increased. And recent years have seen greater demand for comfort, connectivity and security. Rising energy costs, increasingly complex energy systems and a changing regulatory environment foster major growth opportunities in the residential and commercial building sector as well as the services segment. The Bosch Energy and Building Technology business sector combines several areas of expertise: broad technical systems know-how in video surveillance systems, intrusion and fire detection, access control, alarms, evacuation and public address systems, professional audio and conference systems, as well as water heating and comfort heating systems. As the global market leader in microelectromechanical sensors (MEMS), Bosch offers software and sensor technology for internet of things connectivity. The company also offers services for energy management, remote monitoring, and the handling of business processes.

Climatec is recognized in the building industry as an independent single-source integrator of critical building systems including energy services, building automation and security system integration in the U.S. market. The company provides consulting, planning, implementation and 24/7 remote management of comprehensive comfort, security, safety and efficiency solutions. Climatec is active in several market segments and industries including education, healthcare, the public sector, industrial/manufacturing, computing services, office buildings, federal, state and local government, hospitality and energy. Combining these strengths, Bosch can now offer customers a complete portfolio of networked and efficient energy, building automation and security solutions.

Climatec continues as largely independent entity
Climatec will operate as a largely independent entity, maintaining its offices in Arizona, California, Nevada and Texas. Operations will continue to be run by the same management team. Climatec will continue to represent and integrate numerous leading manufactures' product lines across its wide range of services, including Bosch products. As before, the Bosch Security Systems division, Fairport, NY, will continue to sell their security and safety products in the North American market through leading distributors and system integrators.

Time to check-in: Video analytics automate airport security

Time to check-in: Video analytics automate airport security

Editor / Provider: Israel Gogol, freelancer, a&s International | Updated: 12/30/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Airports are at the forefront of using intelligent video analytics to automate their surveillance and operational needs. Recent advances in video footage search as well as better computing options at the edge promise to show an even greater future use of video analytics. However, market education is still needed to fulfill its potential.

Video surveillance cameras have long been used in airports. The introduction of video content analytics (VCA) is a power-multiplier for cameras. “The primary goal of analytics is to transform the cameras into intelligent detectors in order to provide more reliable incidents detection and minimize human error factor,” said Denis Castanet, Director of Business development for EMEA at Bosch Security Systems.

“Video analytics is identified as a lead technology in the growing trend towards reliable, automated systems within airports,” said Bill Flind, CEO of Ipsotek. Flind named some of VCA‘s main benefits: a wise use of VCA reduces human error, reduces man-guarding costs, provides secondary support to other systems, and greatly improves reaction time from alert to action with the use of automated triggers and alerts. Josh Phillips, Director of Marketing of Enterprise & Critical Infrastructure at Video Intelligence Solutions, Verint Systems, also echoed that “VCA is used in areas where alternative sensors are not practical or reliable, or where maintaining security staff for live personnel monitoring is impractical or unreliable.”

New Developments in Video Search
Apart from triggering alerts, VCA plays an important role in searching through the video feeds. The vast amounts of video footage collected daily in a busy environment like an airport is almost impossible to search manually. One of the key strengths of VCA is the ability to enhance the speed of searching through hours of recorded video. There are a variety of VCA manufacturers that can perform a search on the recorded video for different criteria; including color, shape, speed, and time spent in an area. In addition, some can compress hours of recorded video into a stream that shows all activity for a certain time frame, thus simplifying searches for only the things the user is looking for.

“Technology now not only locates a person, but also tracks their route and determines their last known location,” said Jamie Wilson, Security Marketing Manager for EMEA at NICE systems. It works by creating a searchable database of images in real-time, of all the people who have been ‘seen' by surveillance cameras on the network. The investigators can search this database to identify the person they are looking for either according to a time frame or based on a description or picture of the suspect. Using this information the investigator is able to rapidly screen the results to see if the person they are looking for is displayed. Once they have located the person the system presents the investigator with a time-stamped map highlighting where the person has been and at what time and the route taken. Crucially, it will also display the last point the person was spotted, for action to be taken.

Multipurpose use of VCA in Airports
The most common video analytics features are intrusion detection and unattended baggage. Examples are detection of people entering the baggage area through the exit, loitering in secure areas, walking in the wrong direction, detection of vehicles parked in no parking zones, detection of people near the runways or near parked aircraft, and queue management for check-in areas and security lines (measuring the amount of time a person has to wait in line).

VCA is used mainly for security purposes; however, as it becomes more common, more uses are adopted at airports. “Our experience with VCA is that it is used only to the extent that the end user understands its capabilities. This commonly results in the VCA being used for security purposes initially and as its potential is realized by the end user, migrates into lots of other uses,” said Kirk Huss, System III Engineer for G4S Technology USA. “Like any technology, as users become more familiar with VCA, they realize its potential and begin using it for things other than security related issues. Once trained on the system, they get very creative and apply it to all sorts of their business operations.”

Examples of this “dual-use” are re-using existing systems for customer service (queue management for instance) or marketing (customer behavior analysis). “The more advanced VCA is going a step further and actually forecasting with high confidence when a long line will develop, not after it has already happened,” added Phillips. This allows retailers the ability to maximize staff members who sit idle when lines are empty.

Information can be shared also between parties in the airport. Store owners in the airport will usually have their own video surveillance systems inside the store. Even though they are not connected to the airport's system, information can still be shared through mobile applications (e.g., send a picture of a suspect from the store to the airport police), described Todd Brodrick, Director of Sales for South West USA at Pelco by Schneider Electric.

Future: VCA to Initia te Camera Trac king
Today, a major constraint is in making analytics work in a crowded environment. As VCA algorithms improve, so will the ability to overcome the crowded environments at airports. The next challenges in line are successful tracking and hand over from camera to camera. Crowded scenes or obscured views can make reliable tracking across multiple cameras intricate to achieve. However combining other technologies and systems to assist tagging and tracking of individuals through busy scenes such as airport terminals can deliver better results.

“Beyond the analytics themselves the next step is automating the entire process — somebody leaves a bag and the system will automatically jump back and look for the person who left it, recognize him from the database, follow him around as he passes through other parts of the airport, and alert the nearest police officer or guard on duty,” stated Dr. Rustom Kanga, CEO of iOmniscient. “Already we have started using multisensor technology — sound and smell in addition to the video. Humans use all their senses and analytics should too. For example, if the camera detects someone falling down and detects the sound of a gunshot it is a different situation than a simple slip and fall. In years to come such multi-sensor analytics will become ubiquitous.”

VCA is Not a Cure-all Solution
Market knowledge levels are still a concern for vendors and systems integrators implementing VCA solutions. One of the major challenges facing vendors and systems integrators is explaining that VCA is not a panacea and explain its realistic expectations.

“The commercial challenge is for customers to understand what the technology can and cannot do,” explained Kanga. “We focus on educating the market. Most customers use a tender process for their purchasing. If the specifications in the tender are vague the customer may get something that meets the specification but does not work in practice. For instance, if the specification asks for ‘abandoned object detection' they will get a different response than if they ask for ‘abandoned object detection in a very crowded place.' Those few words can make a difference between whether the customer gets something that will work or not.”

“I think the challenge is always the culture. Video analytics is a real new thing in our market, so we spend a lot of time showing to our customers the power of the solution. After that, the solution's technical needs must be redesigned. Usually the customers look at video analytics as a showcase, not as a real solution. We always take potential customers to visit actual customers in order to demonstrate the incredible power of the analytics solution,” explained Jorge Heller, Technology Director of Redisul, a Brazilian systems integrator that took part in securing some of Brazil's airports prior to the last FIFA World Cup.

“We continue to witness a large variation in client knowledge for analytics from those procuring solutions from a zero base through to consultant experts. Even within procuring teams knowledge can vary significantly and it is not always those with the most knowledge that are permitted the most procurement authority,” added Neil Norman, CEO of Human Recognition Systems.

Norman too stressed that education is a critical element of the business development and delivery teams' role for analytics is still to avoid disappointment or underuse of the systems.

Where to Run the Analytics?
Video analytics are generally built on two different types of architecture: server-based and edge-based, performed on the camera. “Camera-side offers scalability and redundancy but lacks in features, performance, and management, whereas server-side offers enhanced performance, features, and management capabilities, but lacks in scalability and has high bandwidth requirements,” explained Zvika Ashani, CTO of Agent Video Intelligence (Agent Vi).

Server-based analytics enjoy several advantages since the servers are all at one central location: easier configuration, management, and maintenance. Since power supply and cooling are less of a concern, it also allows for increased processing power and support for complex video analytics algorithms that provide high performance and easier integration with VMS and PSIM systems. Running the analytics at the edge saves on bandwidth, as constant video transmission over network is not required. It allows for direct control of PTZ camera with minimum latency and since the uncompressed video is analyzed directly at the camera the video analytics performance improves (the video feed doesn't change due to compression). Video can be transmitted on demand or automatically when an event of interest is detected (black screen technology). The major obstacle is the camera's size, power consumption limitations, limited computing power, limited storage space, and limited temperature tolerance operating in direct sunlight or freezing conditions.

Industry professionals predict a trend towards more VCA-at-the-edge units to overcome the limitations of the camera is via two approaches: sharing the workload between edge-unit and server or adding computing power to the camera with an external device.

“A distributed processing approach which utilizes both camera and server processing provides the best of both worlds in terms of scalability, performance, feature set, manageability and bandwidth consumption,” noted Ashani.

Hikvision unveils 1080P Ultra Low-light PTZ network camera

Hikvision unveils 1080P Ultra Low-light PTZ network camera

Editor / Provider: Hikvision | Updated: 12/23/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Hikvision is expanding the DarkFighter range of ultra-low-light surveillance cameras with the release of the DS-2DF8223I-AEL PTZ network camera. This cutting-edge camera utilizes Hikvision's industry-leading, ultra-low-light MP lens and is designed specifically to capture sharp color and monochrome images in extreme, low-light conditions. The result is crystal-clear color images in conditions that would defeat conventional monochrome IP cameras and competing low-light cameras.

The DS-2DF8223I-AEL DarkFighter PTZ opens up new opportunities for 24-hour CCTV surveillance. The incorporation of EIS (Electronic Image Stabilization), 120dB WDR and a host of Smart Detection technologies further improves image quality and operational convenience. The overall excellence of the camera has been recognized by the IFSEC Security & Fire Excellence Awards which has nominated the new DarkFighter PTZ as a finalist for "CCTV Camera Equipment of the Year".

Award-winning low-light specifications
The DarkFighter camera features a large, two-megapixel, 1/1.9 inch progressive scan CMOS image sensor for capturing full color images down to 0.002 Lux and B/W to 0.0002 Lux. Together with a 120 dB WDR (wide dynamic range) and Hikvision's 3D DNR (Digital Noise Reduction) technology, the camera is capable of streaming full HD 1920 x 1080 video at full frame rate. IR distance of up to 200 metres is further supported to ensure image capture in the darkest environment.

Smart features
The camera features a wide range of Smart detection features, including face detection, intrusion detection, line crossing detection and audio exception. The great improvement on security efficiency benefits users and, more importantly, key events/objects are recorded for further forensic needs. These features, combined with smart tracking, which enables the camera to detect any progressively moving object and follow it within the camera's area of coverage without fault, place the DarkFighter head and shoulders above other PTZ and IP cameras. Smart Defog and EIS (Electronic Image Stabilization) are further supported to improve image quality in challenging conditions.

High power optics
DarkFighter PTZ is fitted with a fast and powerful 23x optical zoom lens, which zooms from wide open to fully zoomed in less than five seconds. This high-power lens is capable of rotating endlessly through a full 360 degrees and tilting from -20 to 90 degrees. Besides, its ultra-low-light performance is augmented with infrared capability over a range of 200 meters. In addition, up to 300 preset positions can be programmed and the new camera also enables up to 32 presets in up to 8 patrols. The DarkFighter PTZ will also scan up to 4 patterns and supports up to 24 ROI areas.

The DS-2DF8223I-AEL DarkFighter PTZ is the latest member of the growing DarkFighter family of ultra-low-light CCTV cameras. It is fully protected by an integrated heater in the sturdy IP66 and vandal-proof housing, making it the perfect candidate for deployment in challenging outdoor environments both day and night down to temperatures as low as -40°C. High-PoE and 24VAC power supply are supported as well.

In addition, Hikvision is also expanding customer choice with the introduction of another DarkFighter PTZ member, the DS-2DF6223-AEL 2MP Smart PTZ Outdoor Network Camera. This camera shares all the other excellent functionalities of the DS-2DF8223I-AEL with the exception of IR capability.

For more information on the DarkFighter PTZ network cameras, please be sure to stop by the Hikvision booth SA-C11 at the coming INTERSEC show.

Hikvision introduces mini fisheye camera to

Hikvision introduces mini fisheye camera to "Easy IP" range

Editor / Provider: Hikvision | Updated: 12/18/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Fisheye Network Camera will bring new level of security to small-to-medium businesses
Hikvision is set to bring new levels of security to convenience stores, hotels, restaurants, offices and other small-to-medium enterprises with the introduction of the DS-2CD2942F Fisheye Network Camera. This cutting edge camera incorporates a high-quality lens and 4-megapixel detector in a discrete, ultra-compact design small enough to be inconspicuous on any ceiling yet provides complete situational awareness for entire rooms.

The DS-2CD2942F is the latest addition to Hikvision's "Easy IP" range of cameras, NVRs and VMS software, which are specially designed to bring the benefits of simple installation and operation to small- to medium-sized business or home. The panoramic view with multi-view de-warping and digital PTZ, plus on-board storage of up to 64 GB and choice of Ethernet or 802.11n Wi-Fi connectivity means a single DS-2CD2942F can usually replace the plethora of traditional CCTV cameras installed in most public areas.

Wide Field of View
The new DS-2CD2942F features a 4-megapixel, 1/3" Progressive Scan CMOS image sensor allied with a 1.6mm F1.6 lens boasting a 186° field of view. Together with the digital PTZ control and multi-view de-warping of the dual image streams, the new camera will provide crystal-clear coverage across a far wider area than other camera types. Instead of fitting multiple narrow-angle box or bullet cameras, "Easy IP" users can now reply on a single ceiling-mounted DS-2CD2942F to capture all their images without blind spots. Hikvision's 3D DNR and digital WDR technology also secures superior image quality at a maximum resolution of 2560 x 1440 pixels.

24-Hour Surveillance
The DS-2CD2942F is equipped with electronic day and night cycling, and is capable of operating in low-light conditions down to 0.01 lux in colour and 0.001 in black and white. The new camera can also operate down to zero lux over a range of up to 8 metres if the IR option is specified.

Multiple Alarm Triggers
The DS-2CD2942F maximises security options for users through a wide range of alarm triggers and a customisable day/night switch, allowing automatic or scheduled triggering. Alarm triggers include Line crossing, Intrusion detection, Motion detection, Dynamic analysis, Tampering alarm, Network disconnect, IP address conflict, and Storage exception.

The "Easy IP" Range
Hikvision's "Easy IP" range brings together a complete solution of cameras, NVRs (network video recorders) and VMS (video management software) focused on easy installation, easy viewing and easy Wi-Fi connection. "Easy IP" allows users to monitor their home or business on their PC, tablet or smartphone through a uniquely simple interface. Wi-Fi camera connection is just easy, without IP address forwarding; and Automatic Network Reconnection (ANR) enables on-board storage supported cameras - like the DS-2CD2942F - to create temporary recordings automatically and upload the stored video when the connection recovers. Users can choose from a full range of "Easy IP" cameras, including indoor and outdoor bullet and dome cameras, mini-dome cameras, cube camera, a Mini IR Pan & Tilt camera and the new DS-2CD2942F. All share a rich feature set and unmatched price-efficiency.

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