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HD-over-coaxial: Ultimate battle for survival by analog manufacturers

HD-over-coaxial: Ultimate battle for survival by analog manufacturers

Editor / Provider: Alf Chang, a&s International | Updated: 10/23/2014 | Article type: Tech Corner

The overarching view in the security industry right now is that IP, which employs a network infrastructure and offers HD video, will one day replace analog solutions, which have defined video surveillance for half a century. For analog players, who are seeing declines in sales and revenue, they must find ways to regain their former dominance in the industry. HD-overcoaxial solutions, which deliver HD video over users' existing coaxial cabling, represent their ultimate battle for survival amidst the IP invasion.

Ever since 960H and HD-SDI emerged in 2011, video surveillance players have been trying to find solutions that enhance the quality of CCTV, which remains the mainstream surveillance technology. Analog cameras are inexpensive and easy to install, and they still dominate the market with 70 to 80 percent of market share. However, IP cameras are threatening the very existence of analog players, who are seeing a steady revenue decline. Against this backdrop, analog players seeking to survive have put intensive efforts into the R&D of high-resolution HD-over-coaxial solutions. HDCVI, HDTVI, ccHDtv, and AHD are the products of those efforts.

Any HD-over-coaxial solution, be it 960H, HD-SDI, HDCVI, HDTVI, AHD, and ccHDtv, must be easy to use over the end user's legacy coaxial cable. HD transmission should be achieved using 5C-2V (RG-59U) or 3C-2V (RG-6) coaxial cable without quality loss, and the traditional distance barrier of 100 to 200 meters must be overcome. The solution must incur no extra cost for installation or upgrade, resist quality loss over a long distance, and enable easy upgrade to megapixel-level HD surveillance. Further, it must be high in quality and competitive in price to gain a stronger foothold in vertical markets. In summary, for a solution to be called HD-over-coaxial, six basic requirements must be met:

1. It must have high video clarity and color separation, as well as high signal filtering, noise reduction, and image restoration capabilities;

2 .As HD-over-coax is claimed as a breakthrough technology, it must be able to transmit signals for a longer distance over existing coaxial cable;

3 .The solution must not be subject to latency, compression-related quality loss, or any compromise to video quality;

4 The backend equipment must be compatible with the 960H format, and future compatibility with analog splitters and matrix systems must be considered;

5. HD-over-coax must be easy to use and operate and allow settings on both frontend and backend equipment;

6. Any solution must have low cost and high quality.

There are HD-over-coaxial DVRs that can support both 960H and 720/1080p. These are called hybrid HD DVRs. There are even HD DVRs that are bolstered by Intersil's decoder chip and the TCP/IP interface to support 960H, 720p/1080p, and IP signals. These are called Tri-brid HD DVRs.

Compare and contrast between solutions
HDCVI, HDTVI, and AHD share one thing in common: as opposed to 960H that uses the CCD sensor, HDCVI, HDTVI, and AHD use the megapixel-level CMOS or Exmor CMOS sensor. The purpose is to capture HD images at the source level. Among manufacturers of CMOS sensors are Sony, Omnivision, Pixelplus, and BYD. The formation of images differs slightly according to brand.

Another similarity as far as components are concerned is the use of an image signal processor (ISP) in conjunction with the sensor. This device ultimately determines the final image displayed by HDCVI, HDTVI, and AHD solutions. The chipset could be integrated into the sensor module or into the transceiver at the backend of the HDCVI, HDTVI, or AHD camera. Image signal processors, whose manufacturers include Sony, Fullhan, Nextchip, and Eyenix, process and enhance images formed by the sensor. As ISPs of different companies are designed differently, they have different ways of handling backlight compensation, WDR noise reduction, and the 3As, namely auto white balance, auto exposure, and auto focus.

One final thing that the solutions have in common is the presence of a signal transceiver, which produces different signal formats based on the technology in question, namely HDCVI, HDTVI, and AHD. Regardless of the technology, these transceivers are similar in that they combine signal augmentation, voltage augmentation, and MCU all in one device and emit signals over different transmission distances. There is also a circuit switch that allows cameras to switch between HD-over-coaxial and CVBS output.

All HD-over-coaxial signals travel through coaxial cables, which can be 5C-2V (RG-59U) or 3C-2V (RG-6) for transmission of between 300 and 500 meters. Among the things that set them apart are the codec engine, which is made by TI, Hisilicon, or Grain Media, and the performance of ISP processing.

Application in verticals
Based on how things look right now, to popularize HDCVI, HDTVI, and AHD and widen their reach in different verticals, it seems manufacturers still have lots of publicity and marketing to do. In fact, I still have doubts over their market acceptance beyond the banking, financial, and retail verticals, as 960H and HD-SDI themselves are still mostly deployed in retail, banking, and education. It is my hope that fiber optic providers can develop and commercialize HD-over-coaxial interfaces, so that HDCVI, HDTVI, and AHD can go beyond small and medium implementations and find their way into city and highway surveillance, which requires HD and real-time video transmission.

Currently, there aren't any credible or authoritative figures on the market acceptance toward HDCVI, HDTVI and AHD. Yet, marketing strategies differ according to manufacturers and their OEM partners. Based on our observation, a lack of understanding of the different solutions is the biggest obstacle that manufacturers need to deal with right now.

Opportunities and future development
HD and intelligence are future development trends that analog players seeking to upgrade their HD products future, advances in CMOS, ISP, and transceivers will cause HD-over-coaxial surveillance to become a norm. Applications in different verticals will also become more noticeable. In security, there is a notion that IP will replace analog. But this will not happen anytime soon, and HD-over-coaxial marks the effort by analog players to at least slow the IP invasion and analog's decline. In the end, maybe there is a purpose for the existence of these solutions.


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LILIN IP product manufacturer certified as HDMI Adopter by HDMI Licensing

LILIN IP product manufacturer certified as HDMI Adopter by HDMI Licensing

Editor / Provider: Sponsored by LILIN | Updated: 10/13/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

LILIN, a world-renowned IP camera manufacturer, is proud to announce its wholly-owned factory in New Taipei City, Taiwan, has been named as a Certified HDMI® Adopter by HDMI Licensing, the agent responsible for licensing the High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) specification. There are more than 1,200 of the leading electronics manufacturers have adopted HDMI connectivity. As a certified adopter, LILIN is authorized to design, manufacture, and sell licensed products meeting the HDMI specification standards.

With HDMI certification in place, LILIN's rigorous quality control procedures continue ensuring its products' function. As a global provider in digital products for CCTV video surveillance industry, this certification further demonstrates LILIN's on-going commitment to offer worldwide customers services and products with long term reliability. LILIN fully complies with the HDMI specifications and Adopter Agreement. As an official certified HDMI Adopter, customers can be confident that the HDMI high speed cable delivers high-standard audio and video with lasting performance.

 


Sponsored by: 
LILIN is a global IP video manufacturer with over 30 years of experience. Throughout the years, the company has maintained its dedication to Creativity, Progress, and Excellence providing expertise in digital video with a strong focus on innovation moving forward.

VIVOTEK's convenient retail solution is now on the market

VIVOTEK's convenient retail solution is now on the market

Editor / Provider: VIVOTEK | Updated: 10/9/2014 | Article type: Security 50

VIVOTEK is pleased to announce that its Convenient Retail Solution is now available on the market. In the face of challenging economic conditions, VIVOTEK recognizes the demands of retail market customers and has responded by developing the cost-effective and user-friendly “Convenient Retail Solution”. The state-of-the-art solution comprises the ND8321, an 8-channel plug-and-play network video recorder, elegantly designed ultra-mini bullet network cameras, and ultra-mini dome network cameras. The solution is especially ideal for retail outlets like convenience stores, boutique stores, restaurants, and clothing stores.

Steve Ma, Executive Vice President of VIVOTEK, remarked, “There is a rising awareness of the benefits brought by security systems, and the installation of a surveillance solution has become something of a prerequisite in this regard. However, some smaller scale retail owners might hesitate to embrace high quality surveillance solutions because of the price tag. Whenever it comes to cost, retail owners often choose the most affordable solution, compromising quality by doing so. VIVOTEK, bearing the market in mind, has now developed the Convenient Retail Solution, a quality performance system at a reasonable cost. The goal is to help our customers improve the security, efficiency, operational flow and productivity of retail staff affordably, to ensure a safer and more comfortable shopping environment for customers without having to break the bank.”

VIVOTEK's Convenient Retail Solution is again a strong demonstration of VIVOTEK's innovation in solution design and development:
* Standalone Desktop NVR ND8321: ND8321 is a compact Linux embedded 8-CH NVR, designed for any small-scale video surveillance installation. The "One Button Setup" functionality makes ND8321 simple and easy to use. Supporting Full HD HDMI local video output, video from the NVR can be viewed directly. Together with VAST CMS and ST7501 VMS, users can set up an easy-to-use IP surveillance system. In addition, ND8321 supports mobile applications and iViewer for both Android and iOS handheld devices, enabling users to monitor live video anytime, anywhere.


* Ultra-mini Bullet Network Cameras IB8156 and IB8168: Both cameras are ultra-mini bullet network cameras with an elegant design, especially suitable for indoor applications in which discreetness is of utmost importance. Featuring 1.3-Megapixel and 2-Megapixel CMOS Sensors, respectively, IB8156 and IB8168 can produce superb image quality around the clock.


* Ultra-mini Dome Network Cameras FD8168: FD8168 is an ultra-mini fixed dome network camera. Similar to IB8168, FD8168 is equipped with a 2-Megapixel CMOS sensor, ideal for indoor applications in which cameras have to blend in with interior decoration.

Dahua enhances security level for Saudi Arabian petrochemical

Dahua enhances security level for Saudi Arabian petrochemical

Editor / Provider: Dahua | Updated: 10/9/2014 | Article type: Infrastructure

“Oil and gas” are definitely among the top mentions that come across one's mind when talking about Saudi Arabia, and as a matter of fact, this country owns one-fifth of the total global conventional oil reserves, ranking No.2 largest in the world, after Venezuela. With this unsurpassed natural resources, the Saudi made petrochemical as its pillar industry with a complete and mature system from exploration, exploitation to transportation as well as the extensions to the whole industry chain.

Al-Jubail petrochemical company (Kemya), established in 1979, is one of the largest petrochemical corporate in the country; and over these years, the company keeps in expansion and innovation, aiming to create a more productive yet safer and greener working environment; and video surveillance system upgrading is part of the plan.

According to the integrator, Kemya's existing surveillance structure is based on analog, but to acquire easy maintenance and management, the client plans to upgrade the system to network by introducing encoders as a transit station on the basis of the existing analog cameras, and using network video recorder for storage while VMS platform for a comprehensive management.

“Unlike other projects that we were involved at the very beginning,” said Peter Xuan, Overseas Project Manager at Dahua Technology. “When the integrator found us, the whole project has almost had everything settled, except the back-end part as the devices that planned to be adopted failed to meet the demand of the client — to be compatible with the third party encoders and VMS.”

“I soon realized that it could be our great chance, though we do face a serious challenge — the tight time frame,” Xuan continued. “As the project needs to be implemented in a short period of time, and waiting means wasting, so after I got the detail requirement of the client, we start immediately on planning and making proposal, and soon we narrowed down the model to NVR724-256DR, a 256-channel super network recorder.”

NVR724-256DR supports 256ch @1080p real-time recording and has an impressive 512 Mbps incoming capability, which is to say, the device is fully capable to ensure the smooth operation, and since large storage is a necessity for big scale and crucial applications, take this case for example, the plant needs 24/7 non-stop monitoring, which inevitably generates a large volume of data, so iSCSI & Mini SAS expansion is provided to render possibility for mass extra storage, in addition to the default 24-HDD accommodation.

Moreover, the NVR is equipped with a LCD screen, making adjusting and maintenance much easier. The most important part in this case is the integration with a third party encoders and VMS software, thus a lot of effort, such as SDK and sample providing as well as testing was made to make everything right, ensuring the integration goes smoothly.

Meanwhile, petrochemical related industry is characterized with “three highs”— high investment, high-tech and high risk. Any error or miscarriage will lead to a disaster, causing great losses in people's life and property, and video footages are crucial for evidences in mishaps. This requires very high stability of the system, so Dahua have done a series of customization to ensure system 100% stable and reliable by adding redundant power supply, RAID and N+M hot standby in this case.

“As a saying goes, when need is highest, help is highest, “said Lourenco Rui, Technical Manager of Thales Group, a local system integrator. “We are very satisfied with Dahua's prompt response and its good product quality and professionalism helps us successfully complete this urgency project and all the integration in such a short time, ensuring the smooth implementation of the project.”

Xuan emphasized that compatibility is always one focus we've been paying attention to, and this case is a good proof to that point. The whole project only took one month before everything's settled; customers' needs and satisfaction are always the focus of a project. Dahua aims to provide the high-standard and tailor-made security solution to each individual industry and client.

DIY surveillance kits for homes

DIY surveillance kits for homes

Editor / Provider: Weili Lin, a&s SMAhome | Updated: 10/2/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Ease of use, affordability and smart user experiences drive product developments of the smart home systems. The home DIY surveillance kits are described as combination of smart hardware, software and cloud technology. Software enhancement adds value on home surveillance kits. Video recording plays a crucial role. There are pros and cons toward local and cloud video storage. No doubt, the supporters for secure and complete recorded videos still opt for complete surveillance systems like home surveillance kits or home monitor systems.

DIY home surveillance kits consist of two, four or eight wired or wireless cameras, and a NVR. Other solutions called home monitoring systems come with wireless cameras and portable touch screen displays, offering local storage on a SD card. The mainstream features comprise easy installation, self-explanatory operation, day and night vision, one-way or two-way audio, remote viewing on the smartphone or tablet, motion and sound detection, alert notification and HD video recording. The HD video resolutions are available with 720P, 960P and 1080P. The current offerings include indoor cube, dome and bullet cameras along with IP66 waterproof and vandal-resistant outdoor cameras. Users can add cameras from different locations to one account.

The NVR with a built-in hard drive designed for 24/7 surveillance provides weeks or even months of recorded videos, depending on hard drive capacity and recording resolutions. Users can customize the recording settings to fit their needs like 720p recording resolution or a lower resolution for extended recording time. There are smart designs like automatic frame rate adjustment.

The cameras, with motion detection, maintain low frame rate of 1 fps, and enhance the frame rate up to 25 or 30 fps when detecting any intruder. DIY surveillance kits are widely used for homes and small businesses like small offices and shops.

For smart home use, IP cameras are accepted as the mainstream adoption; wireless kits are gaining popularity. In terms of connectivity, 2.4GHz and Wi-Fi are two major wireless standards. Home DIY users prefer to purchase and setup systems on their own. Wireless connectivity offers clutter-free and hassle-free setup experience for them, whereas wired cameras take their power directly from the mains to avoid the missed crucial moment when the power goes out. Users can just place the cameras in the important outdoor locations without running video cables, and then simply power up the wireless cameras. After setting up the mobile apps, users can start remote monitoring homes by running multiple viewers. Improved networking and cloud computing technologies make home surveillance easy as 123.

The fun for DIY is not just self-installation. Users may take pleasure in customizing the systems on their own. The DIY surveillance kits offer custom settings on motion zones, alert and recording schedules, and bandwidth to match individual's internet speed.

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
Smart home system is defined to have a smartphone app or a web portal as a user interface. As network infrastructure matures, home surveillance kits are prone to support the cloud platform and apps for remote viewing and operation on mobile devices. Unlike traditional home surveillance systems, today home users can complete setup with smartphones or tablets with ease. For example, user can just scan the QR code to complete setup and view real-time video remotely from smartphones. Easy setup with handheld devices without PCs provides handy surveillance experience. No installation and contract fees are other selling points. Also, users can upload videos and photos to cloud storage media like Dropbox, Google Drive and Baidu Cloud.

In the smart home industry, the revenue generated from hardware sales is relatively small. How to utilize cloud service to achieve a sustainable business model has been a hot topic to discuss. For example, the cloud service from Dropcam delivers a new user experience and business model. It charges for continuous video footage of 7-day cloud recordings.

Cloud storage for video backup is adopted to avoid hard drive failure, and prevents intruders from destroying evidence—security footage. At present, the cloud service is provided by system providers or third-party software companies. Besides, the cloud storage lowers down the retail pricing of the surveillance kit that contains a NVR. However, the profitable business models and operational stability are two challenges to deal with.

Bandwidth availability and invasion of privacy are viewed as a growth inhibitor of cloud storage. Besides, the incomplete uploaded videos may lead to disputes. The adoption of the NVR or home NAS makes users exempt from occupied bandwidth by other applications like online gaming. In addition, cloud storage can only be affordable in the places where network infrastructures are mature like the US.

SMARTER FUNCTION, SAFER HOME
Hardware functionality is limited; software creates more value to the systems. The majority of home surveillance kits are offered by professional surveillance system companies. They offer nearly professional-grade systems with affordable prices to smart home users. The user interface is simple, but the back-end software functionality can be complicated.

Therefore, we can expect more and more intelligent features to be introduced for home surveillance systems, such as auto-tracking, fog-penetration or defog function, anti-glare and Intelligence Video Surveillance (IVS) features. The intelligence video surveillance features include face recognition, perimeter alarm, and multiple intelligent video query functionality like snapshot and smart search. Region of Interest (ROI) face detection let users to track and snapshot moving individuals walking through the viewing region.

Biometrics is the government's new black

Biometrics is the government's new black

Editor / Provider: Eifeh Strom, a&s International | Updated: 10/1/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

No longer just a technology used by spies in movies and science-fiction novels, biometrics technology has found a very real use in everyday applications, particularly by government entities looking for more efficient identity management of its citizens. In the form of biometric national identification cards and even e-passports, biometrics is fast becoming the new black for identity management.

Biometrics technology often finds itself the center of attention in spy movies — a spy cuts off the finger of a high-ranking official to access a secret off-book site or lifts a fingerprint from a coffee mug to access top-secret files. Oddly enough, these examples are also reasons people have hesitations about biometrics for security purposes — if it is that easy to hack in a movie, what about in reality? This is a common concern especially now that an increasing number of governments worldwide are choosing to use biometric information for identity management. In fact, the use of biometrics technology is growing quite rapidly throughout the world in various applications.

According to a report by Transparency Market Research, the global biometrics technology market is projected to reach a value of US$23.3 billion by 2019, at a CAGR of 20.8 percent from 2013 to 2019 — APAC is expected to grow at the fastest CAGR of 22% from 2013 to 2019.

Growth of biometrics technology has in large part been due to recent government initiatives in regions around the world. Projects such as e-passports, national identification programs, and various border control projects such as the European Dactyloscopy (EURODAC), the European Union Visa Information Systems (VIS), and new generation Schengen Information System (SIS II) are propelling the biometrics market forward, according to Transparency Market Research. The report further pointed out that the transport/visa/ logistics and government segments made up more than 50% of the total biometrics technology market in 2012, due to the growing need to examine travelers' credentials.

Why Governments are Going Biometric
As terrorist attacks and other crimes continue to be a threat, it has become all the more important for governments to make sure its citizens are safe by taking measures to not only tighten security, but to keep better track of its citizens.

Convenience is a big plus for governments looking for a better way to manage identities, as well as the many other benefits biometrics technology brings. One big positive that comes from using biometrics is the integrity and credibility it provides to databases and transactions. “One of the attributes of biometrics is that in the enrollment process there is a de-duplication or adjudication of the data to assure that one person is enrolled at a time,” said Bill Dumont, EVP of M2SYS. “This gives the database integrity and assures things such as one person, one vote or one family gets one helping of food rations.”

Standards Play Their Part
When a government decides to utilize such technology, high standards for the equipment used must be met. However, like for anything, there are many different standards and certifications that are issued by many different existing institutions and organizations. There are, however, certain certifications that are more commonly used such as those issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) or US Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI), Dumont said. “Most countries rely on quality standards from the NIST or US FBI such as appendix F certification (Appendix F has stringent image quality conditions, focusing on the human fingerprint comparison and facilitating large scale machine many-to-many matching operations) or PIV (personal identity verification) certification (PIV-071006 is a lower-level standard designed to support one-to-one fingerprint verification.”

Some countries, such as India, have their own standards for biometric use by the government. As part of the Unique Identification (UID) program in India, also known as AADHAR, the Standardization Testing and Quality Certification (STQC) organization was created to develop standards to assure quality of the biometric data. As the world's largest rollout of biometric national IDs, making sure that the rollout went as smoothly as possible was not only important for the sake of efficiency, but money as well. “This organization [STQC] worked with vendors and subject matter experts from around the globe to develop standards for the UID program,” Dumont said. “By having quality standards, it makes it possible to have a valid database of 1.2 billion citizens.” With roughly 17% of the world's population, poor quality enrollments by substandard biometrics devices would only cause problems further down the line; problems a rollout of this magnitude cannot afford.

In Bolivia, biometrics devices are tested and rated before a purchase decision is made, according to Dumont. “For instance, in Bolivia, they tested and rated the 10 print (fingerprint) devices and chose the one with the best quality to assure that their registered voter's data was of good quality.” Whereas countries like Bolivia test products before making a decision, countries like China make assessments of companies before R&D for products can even begin. “In China, the government has strict requirements and standards for the official suppliers [of biometrics devices],” said Anna Liu, Marketing Manager at ZKTeco. “Suppliers need to pass a lot of assessments on the company size, production ability, and patents before they can start the R&D on national ID products.”

Smartphones Provide Renewed Interest in Biometrics
Although, biometrics technology is in no way new, it is only more recently that it has found more widespread use across different verticals. While government usage of biometrics is definitely helping to drive growth, many in the industry believe that commoditization of biometrics in the form of fingerprint identification in smartphones is the real growth driver.

“The main driving force as we see it is biometrics of different modalities making its ways to the public in the new generation of smartphones. This will commoditize usage, and while people learn about the possibilities and more openly embraces the technology, more synergies will be possible with national projects such as ID card rollouts as well as global projects such as payment cards,” said to Håkan Persson, CEO of Precise Biometrics. “When the citizen remains in control over their biometric information (as with a fingerprint stored in a smartphone's secure element), storing and matching the biometrics on a smart card ID will open up for new and stronger business opportunities.”

Kim Humborstad, CEO of Zwipe also noted the importance of biometrics in smartphones: “Since the integration of a fingerprint scanner on the iPhone 5s, the market has been buzzing about other applications, such as mobile banking, mobile payments, and government identification. In five years' time, you will see the biometric card with implementations in many different card segments both within the access control industry and outside.”

Fingers, Eyes, or Veins?
With the many different types of biometrics technology out there, including fingerprint, face, iris, palm prints, and vascular biometrics such as a finger vein or palm vein, what type a government chooses to deploy depends on several different factors. “In some countries, capturing two fingerprints will suffice while in others they want their database to contain multiple biometric modalities such as fingerprint, face capture, and iris capture,” Dumont explained. “In some cases the modality is chosen for hygiene reasons, choosing a non-touch modality such as iris where you can capture an iris without touching the citizen. In some cases where they have a high percentage of their population involved in heavy manual labor they choose either 10 fingerprints or vascular modalities because many times fingers are missing or the finger is so damaged that it's impossible to get a clear image.”

In light of increased implementation, concerns regarding privacy have only increased alongside. One way to address this issue is through the use of multimodal biometrics systems instead of uni-modal systems. The benefits of multimodal systems include the capability of using “more than one physiological or behavioral characteristic for identity verification and use technologies such as fingerprints, facial features, iris/retinal scans, and vein patterns in conjunction to provide highly secure and above average accuracy,” according to a report by ResearchMoz. Such a system helps to combat the “shortcomings of uni-modal systems such as fingerprints, faces, and iris/retinal recognition systems, as such systems in isolation can be susceptible to errors arising from non-uniform natural and other surrounding factors such as faulty data, human aging, light fluctuations, etc.” In addition, multimodal systems can more effectively prevent spoofing techniques used to hack biometric systems, as duplicating multiple biometric traits instead of just one is exponentially more difficult. For this reason, the adoption of multimodal systems by governments is expected to increase in popularity in the coming years.

Trends for the Future
While barriers, such as high cost and privacy issues, to adoption still exist for biometrics technology, the industry will continue to find ways to break through these walls. Furthermore, as governments find more uses for biometrics such as for voting, food rationing, vehicle registration, etc., and as more solutions come out allowing the holder to be in control of their biometric data, such as cards that store all the biometric data on the card itself and not in a database, giving end users more peace of mind, government applications for biometrics technology will only continue to facilitate and reduce the amount of end-user resistance to government biometrics projects.

 

Hikvision adds 6 megapixel IP camera to SMART range

Hikvision adds 6 megapixel IP camera to SMART range

Editor / Provider: Hikvision | Updated: 9/29/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Hikvision's range of Smart IP cameras is boosted with the launch of the ultra-high-resolution DS-2CD4065F-(A) Network Box Camera. This industry-leading design boasts a large 6 megapixel sensor that delivers razor-sharp 3072 x 2048 images at 25 fps. This model is capable of delivering real-time full HD 1080p video streams at 60 fps, and sustaining up to 20 concurrent live-view channels.

"The introduction of this camera would definitely drive picture imaging to another new height," states Keen Yao, International Marketing Director at Hikvision, "Hikvision is the very first to bring this technology to the security world. As a real breakthrough in HD security, this camera will greatly improve user's experience on video image quality."

Real-time high resolution images
The 6.0 megapixel video at 25 fps will be especially suited to applications requiring highly detailed surveillance. For instance, rather than blanketing a parking lot with low resolution VGA cameras, a single DS-2CD4065F-(A) would be able to cover the entire area. The high resolution and quality lenses also means there is sufficient detail to capture license plate information, clothing and faces that would help law enforcement. Furthermore, its 1/1.8" progressive scan CMOS helps to ensure true colour reproduction of images captured day and night.

Smart features
The DS-2CD4065F-(A) also shares a raft of high-end features with Hikvision's existing Smart IP cameras, including 3D Digital Noise Reduction, Super WDR, auto-switching ICR and electronic image stabilization. Its advanced encoding algorithm streams images at a very low bitrate without compromising quality, compared to traditional cameras, the new Hikvision Smart camera enhances image quality by up to 30% while minimizing the system's load and storage requirements. Smart IP camera technology also delivers increased detection functionalities, such as Face Detection, Audio Detection, Line Crossing Detection and Video Quality Detection, so as to automatically trigger an alarm in case of an exceptional event happens.

Choice of lenses
The DS-2CD4065F-(A) may also be optionally fitted with Hikvision's renowned HV3816D-8MPIR and HV1140D-8MPIR ultra-low-light MP vari-focal lenses. Both lenses feature 8 megapixel resolutions, IR correction and a minimum aperture of 1.5, allowing users to choose from a focal-range of 3.8-16 mm with the HV3816D-8MPIR or 11-40 mm with the HV1140D-8MPIR.

Available models
The (A) version - DS-2CD4065F-A also features for enhanced performance, reliability and cost effectiveness. The additional ABF (Auto Back Focus) feature automatically adjusts the CMOS position to focus the camera to maintain clear, sharp images and compensates when changing from color to b/w mode or when switching in or out the IR cut filter.

LILIN VMS Navigator tied in with POS and RFID for baggage claim

LILIN VMS Navigator tied in with POS and RFID for baggage claim

Editor / Provider: Sponsored by LILIN | Updated: 9/22/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Navigator 1.0
LILIN VMS platform, Navigator 1.0, is easy to use video management software able to manage up to 108 cameras of H.264/MJPEG HD IP cameras or DVR/NVR's cameras. It can also support up to 108 channels of IP cameras on multiple monitors for TV Wall application. Radio-frequency identification (RFID), Electronic Point of Sale (ePOS), barcode scanner, access control, and Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) can be integrated with Navigator 1.0 for applications in airports to streamline baggage-claim process and in production lines to track and record in-process assembly information an item progresses along the line.

Barcode scanner and/or RDIF is tied in with Navigator to be used in airports for baggage claim management
Navigator 1.0 is the ideal choice of video solution because its open platform video management software allowed integration with the RFID system, it can connect to ONVIF-conformant IP cameras, and its interface is absolutely intuitive and easy-to-use. LILIN VMS solution, Navigator, integrated with barcode scanner / RFID tags automatically track baggage from the ticket counter to the aircraft while a wireless local area network (WLAN) transmits baggage information used to match each piece of luggage on the plane.

LILIN Navigator provides reliable information where a bag is located at all times, from check-in to loading. LILIN solutions can bring peace of mind to your passengers by enhancing security and ensuring that their bags will be waiting for them when their plane lands.

Manufacturing line
LILIN Navigator VMS software can integrate with RFID tag, and manufacturers can track and record in process assembly information into the RFID tag as an item progresses along the line. Assembly line personnel could use an RFID reader to verify which processes have been completed. Intelligent SmartEvent playback system in Navigator with multiple video analytic searches, and you can playback these events by searching a keyword. Maintains current item information on the tag - ideal for managing production of complex or customized products and assemblies, eliminates the need for separate paperwork on assembly status and content.

Key functionalities
* Navigator SmartEvent feature allows you review the video in full screen based on keyword search.
* Keyword search to retrieve video footage across all cameras.
* Replay video based on the keyword search.

 

Sponsored by: 
LILIN is a global IP video manufacturer with over 30 years of experience. Throughout the years, the company has maintained its dedication to Creativity, Progress, and Excellence providing expertise in digital video with a strong focus on innovation moving forward.

Smart cities turn information into meaningful messages with VCA

Smart cities turn information into meaningful messages with VCA

Editor / Provider: Israel Gogol, a&s International | Updated: 9/23/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

People enter the main square, a computer screen at the city's operations center beeps an alert. Analytics engines combining inputs from video and social media predict that a riot is about to erupt. Looking for people potentially carrying weapons, the cameras at the scene automatically detects people carrying backpacks from within the crowd. This is not science fiction: it is part of the capabilities recently demonstrated in Singapore as part of its safe city pilot project. Once an emerging technology, video content analytics (VCA) is becoming more mainstream.

The use of video cameras and video content analytics (VCA) for city surveillance is no longer a novelty. As safe/smart city projects become more prevalent, the traditional use of video surveillance and VCA is changing. Previously restricted to security or safety alone, the future of VCA in a safe/smart city lies in connectivity with other systems, enabling a more dynamic and comprehensive, real-time situation picture, thus allowing operators to better handle events and take full advantage of video footage.

Zvika Ashani, CTO of Agent Vi, elaborated on the use of VCA in a city environment. He pointed out that fundamentally, video analytics are used for three main objectives: security, safety, and city management. Security analytics are based on a predefined organizational security policy and include capabilities such as detecting vehicles parked in no parking zones, intrusion detection, unattended baggage detection, and loitering. Safety analytics can identify crowd gatherings, blocked emergency exits, or a vehicle stuck on a railway. Management analytics uses the data from video cameras to collect statistics used for city planning, such as traffic flow, vehicle counts, speeds, etc.

New innovations coming from Singapore
In 2013, Singapore initiated the Safe City Test Bed project. Its R&D initiative is to develop a safety and security industry with innovative capabilities in the city state. Karianto Leman, Head of the Situational Awareness Analytics Program in Singapore's Institute for Infocomm Research (I2R) — a member of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) — shared some of the key contributions of VCA in smart city security. For example, I2R has developed a system that detects aggressive human actions. The system automatically extracts motion related features and feeds them to an artificial intelligence engine. The engine has been trained with video samples involving aggressive human actions to detect an occurrence of such an incident in real time. In applications, the system can be configured to detect gang fights, rioting, rampaging, etc. Another possible use is to protect security guards from being ambushed. In the safety and city management domains, I2R developed crowd analytics that could work robustly under very crowded conditions. The system can extract from real-time information such as crowd size, walking directions and speeds, and the number of visitors over time. It could also mine these metadata to unveil insights such as popular paths, point-of-interests in retail or exhibition spaces, crowd behaviors, and other statistics.

Key technologies to this are accurate human detections and tracking even when crowd density is very high. This overcomes the pitfall of most video analytics systems where performance drops drastically in crowded conditions. Applications of this technology include crowd sensing and activity profiling at public places such as train stations and shopping malls, allowing, for example, estimations for waiting time in queues for taxis, banking services, etc.

It's all about connectivity
One of the principles behind safe/ smart cities is creating an interconnected environment. In this setting, different systems are combined to ensure the city's safety and efficiency. The future of VCA in safe cities is in connectivity with other systems and combining information from different sources to create a more detailed situational awareness picture. “Security applications are still very much in focus. We are seeing several new VCA applications areas in city safety, efficient use of energy and other public resources, street parking management, and many others,” said Dr. Sadiye Guler, founder and President of intuVision. "For example smart street lights that are automatically brightened when there are only few people on a street to increase safety of the citizens also helps save electricity. The emphasis is on smart city solutions that combine VCA with other sensors and systems to develop city wide combined solutions.”

In addition, “Safe cities are more concerned with making traffic and people flow more efficiently together with improving safety,” said Bill Flind, CEO of Ipsotek. Therefore, he added, “VCA shouldn't be visualized as working alone but as part of the wider situational awareness system providing managers with suggested responses and action plans”.

One example is the image recognition and incident detection system, developed by Ipsotek, for Transport for London (TfL), the department in charge of keeping London's transportation systems flowing. When a road in central London was blocked by a vehicle that had lost control across the carriageway, the system identified within 30 seconds that this was an incident requiring rapid intervention. Predefined contingency plans alerted the relevant TfL staff allowing them to take immediate remedial action including re-sequencing of traffic lights to divert traffic away from the incident spot. The ability to control rapidly developing build-ups of traffic around accidents, keeping traffic flowing through the use of an “always-on” system significantly reduced journey times in London.

Tool for post and pre-event management
According to Jamie Wilson, Security Marketing Manager for EMEA at NICE Systems, the power of VCA is not just in post-event investigation and scenario reconstruction, but “also in the ability to know sooner that an incident could potentially take place, or is starting, improving both the speed and quality of response.”

A good example of this would be VCA reporting crowding and movement through a public space combined with information about an event or sentiment analysis from a social media tool like Twitter or Facebook. This multi-source situational awareness would increase efficiency and help facilitate effective and timely decision making and faster deployment of necessary resources — a police car, a fire engine, or even a garbage truck.

This allows for more efficient management of security forces. The limited resources of security personnel could be optimized by assigning them to the places that require them more urgently. By sharing video footage or images containing the incident to the security officer to validate the alarm, they can get an understanding of the situation.

“Scenario-based video analytic systems accurately recognize complex situations by evaluating and combining multiple conditions. It is this combined analysis that delivers the detailed understanding of the operating environment, and it is this understanding that dramatically reduces false alarms even in complex environments, leading to VCA becoming a trusted information provider to city surveillance projects,” added Flind.

Technological advancement In VCA for city surveillance
City environments are complex environments for VCA to tackle. The challenges include analyzing crowded areas, changing lighting, weather conditions, distance of objects from the camera, the need to seamlessly move from camera to camera when tracking an object, etc. These are but some of the obstacles facing VCA vendors. Despite the challenges, the growing technical capabilities of processing algorithms and advancements in the field of data storage will facilitate a more widespread use of video analytics.

As the number of semantics detected by video analytics grows, so will the efficiency and power of forensic searches. Security officers will be able to conduct faster and more detailed searches. The system developed by I2R, which can detect high-level human semantics could pick out from a human crowd a person carrying a backpack or sling bag. This can be performed on general video surveillance camera image resolution. In addition, the system can detect people wearing sunglasses, headdresses, clothing patterns, etc. It could also estimate the height of the person that the system is tracking. The continuous improvements in data storage will facilitate growing amounts of video footage being stored and analyzed. This means cities will be less restricted when they need to prioritize which information to keep and which to delete.

Too much information to digest?
“The mass of data has become a benefit as opposed to a challenge,” said Wilson. “By integrating all of the data-feeds, the operator is given a single clear picture of what is going on and can focus on using his skills to manage an incident rather than trying to interpret the data. In turn this speeds up resolution of incidents, saving time, money, and resources.” There is still quite a long way to go in intelligent video solutions for safe/smart cities; future goals include features such as automatic tracking and switching between cameras and of course reaching reliable face recognition from security cameras. With the speed at which technology is evolving, and with growing numbers of safe city projects being implemented, these capabilities will for sure be on the agenda of many vendors.

MorphoTrust and the State of North Carolina to pilot first secure electronic ID

MorphoTrust and the State of North Carolina to pilot first secure electronic ID

Editor / Provider: Morpho (Safran) | Updated: 9/18/2014 | Article type: Security 50

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) awarded MorphoTrust USA (Safran) a pilot grant to create an electronic ID (eID) to access online services with the same security, privacy protection and ability to authenticate identity as today's face-to-face transactions.

MorphoTrust, the North Carolina Departments of Transportation (DOT) and Health and Human Services (DHHS), and their partners, will receive $1.47 million over the next two years to test the security, viability and interoperability of an electronic credential that promotes confidence, privacy, choice and innovation to meet the guiding principles of the White House's National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace.

The driver license is the document U.S. citizens most rely on to establish and assert their identity, providing access to a wide range of benefits, privileges and services. However, there is currently no equivalent for online transactions. The objective of this public-private partnership is to bring the well-established trust of the physical driver license into the online environment as a low-cost, readily available, yet highly reliable means of assuring that people are who they claim to be in an online setting.

The goals of the pilot are to:
• Prove that an eID can be created that carries the trust of a secure credential and can be used to eliminate in-person identity proofing requirements.
• Demonstrate elevation of trust using biometric multi-factor authentication
. • Define a framework through which states and commercial entities can trust each eID.

To achieve these goals, MorphoTrust will leverage the North Carolina driver license, state ID documents and system of record to create an eID for those applying for the North Carolina DHHS Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) Program online. This is intended to eliminate the need for people to appear in person to apply for FNS benefits, reducing costs to the state while providing applicants with faster, easier access to the benefits they need. In addition to the North Carolina DOT and DHHS, MorphoTrust will partner with The University of Texas at Austin Center for Identity, Gluu, Toopher, miiCard and Privacy Engineer Debra Diener for this pilot. “Trust is necessary to enable the growing web economy and ensure the security of our identities online,” MorphoTrust CEO Bob Eckel said. “Working with our partners, MorphoTrust's plan is to facilitate this trust, allowing individuals to confidently assert their identity online, and provide relying parties with the assurance that these identities are trustworthy.”

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