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Dahua ITS relieves traffic congestion in Poland cities

Dahua ITS relieves traffic congestion in Poland cities

Editor / Provider: Dahua | Updated: 8/21/2014 | Article type: Infrastructure

Tricity, in Polish Trójmiasto, is an urban area consisting of three major northern Polish cities — Gdańsk, Gdynia and Sopot, situated adjacent to one other on the coast of the Gdańsk Bay, Baltic Sea; These three cities covering an area of 414.81 square kilometers, seeing nearly 1 million commuters each day, are known as a busy harbor, modern metropolis, and amazing resort at the mean time.

While the cities keep expanding, the rising population leads to traffic concern, congestion. Its urban inner highway, which is the transport backbone, accommodating nearly 1 million commuters every day and citizens spend more and more time on commuting. In order to better manage, the city traffic needs and solve out the congestion, the local authority decided to use intelligent traffic system (ITS) to better improve traffic in the city and also people can have better efficiency of their work and life.

The project started in 2010, Dahua's customization satisfied the end-user since it is quite suitable for the local market because of its great performance, easy installation and good price. The adopted ITS systems integrate Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPRs), red light enforcement, speed systems, green waves as a whole in order to regulate driving behaviors and fight against traffic jams. For ANPR systems, Dahua 1.4-megapixel and 11-megapixel HD traffic cameras are adopted at intersections on main roads, taking care of the snapshot of front and back side of the vehicle respectively. Moreover, both loops and video detection are used to improve accuracy. As for speeding violations, speed systems are installed and approved by metrology law to make fines to control urban driving speed and improve road safety.

Additionally, to further improve traffic efficiency, green waves are adopted on lights intersection, allowing continuous traffic flow smoothly over several intersections in one main direction, which not only reduces the length and frequency of congestion, but also cuts co2 emissions and improves fuel efficiency of the vehicles, meanwhile, buying more time for pedestrians at crossings.

“We already assured different customers in Poland and neighboring countries to work on ITS projects based on Dahua cameras and detectors,” said Piotr Wisniewski from Radar system, a local distributor in Poland.

“It is a great example that a European city uses Chinese ITS deployment, we appreciate our partner's trust and the effort they have made,” said Bill Zhou, Senior ITS Engineer at Dahua Technology. “Traffic problem is a common issue for many expanding cities, and our ITS is only helping the city reinforce but also giving a better, smarter and more efficient city.”

VIVOTEK introduces advanced video content analysis solutions

VIVOTEK introduces advanced video content analysis solutions

Editor / Provider: VIVOTEK | Updated: 8/19/2014 | Article type: Security 50

VIVOTEK has announced its first video content analysis (VCA) application package, which includes three key functions: Field Detection, Line Crossing Detection, and Object Counting. Introduction of the new VCA application package follows the debut of the VIVOTEK Application Development Platform (VADP), an open platform for integrating video analytic functionality within its cameras. Now, the VCA package can analyze data directly on a camera to provide solutions for business applications, in addition to traditional security use cases.

Powerful Intelligent Functions
The Field Detection feature allows users to define a zone in the field of view for automated monitoring. Whenever a person or object either enters or leaves this zone, the event is automatically detected, and notification is sent to the video management server or other back-end infrastructure. Line Crossing functionality is used to set up a virtual line within the camera's field of view so that when a person or object crosses the line, the event is detected. VIVOTEK's implementation of this feature detects line crossing from either the left or the right, or from either direction at once. In addition to obvious security applications, the Field Detection and Line Crossing could be used to demarcate a zone in the field of view corresponding to an area in physical space where access is restricted.

The Object Counting feature is particularly valuable for retail applications, providing quantitative data on variables such as in-store traffic and shopper behavior, as well as for transport-related applications, where the function can be used to track the number of passengers, vehicles, and so forth. Software accessing the precise numerical data provided by the Object Counting algorithm can then provide a reliable basis for users to make business decisions, improve service, increase operational efficiency, perform in-depth analysis, and more.

In the business realm, these three key functions aid to improve the customer experience, adjust staffing levels, or determine sales conversion rates, among many other possibilities.

Tapping Market Trends
VIVOTEK Executive Vice President Steve Ma remarked, "The use of surveillance cameras is expanding from their traditional role in security to business applications. VIVOTEK is leading this trend in a big way with our on-camera video content analysis and the VIVOTEK Application Development Platform. We can't wait to see the powerful software plug-ins that developers are going to create using this combination-and the benefits they will bring to retailers and other customers around the world."

The full VIVOTEK video content analysis suite, including Field Detection, Line Crossing Detection, and Object Counting modules, is available immediately on VIVOTEK's MD8562, FE8174/74V, and FE8173 cameras. The company plans to integrate Field Detection and Line Crossing functions in other camera models in the near future.

Smart lock: Unlocking a smarter, more secure home

Smart lock: Unlocking a smarter, more secure home

Editor / Provider: a&s SMAhome | Updated: 8/18/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

According to a survey by Consumer Reports, 67 percent of Americans rely on deadbolt locks as the primary mean to secure their homes. However, the survey also revealed that 20 percent of Americans leave the front door unlocked at least occasionally. Another problem is that door keys are small infrequently used objects that are easily misplaced. Smart locks set out to solve these problems, with some extra twists.

With the Internet of Things picking up momentum, its residential applications allow device makers to cheaply add wireless connectivity to everything in a home. Wireless connectivity, in conjunction with a strong focus on user experience, sets the stage for new types of residential access control systems. According to a recent report by NextMarket Insights, the global smart lock market will grow from $261 million today to $3.6 billion by 2019.

“The mainstreaming of the smart home is driving innovation in previously forgotten categories of home hardware and systems,” said Michael Wolf, Chief Analyst with NextMarket Insights. “Established security and home hardware companies increasingly face competition from upstarts who are introducing a new breed of smart and connected locks into the market.”

What is a smart lock?
A new type of wireless door lock that allows a user to use mobile devices to remotely lock or unlock the door, send permanent or temporary virtual keys to guests to grant access, and receive push notifications when the door is accessed. Some also integrate with smart home systems. These locks are generally affordable, rather than luxury items.

CURRENT OFFERINGS
At the moment, six smart locks have garnered the most media attention because they show the potential of a reimagined residential access control system that can be easy to install and use, and provides additional convenience compared to conventional deadbolt locks like remote access and integration with smart home systems. Push notifications and visitor logs also help boost security. The main theme is to make smartphones the primary key to the door, and a key fob, mechanical key or PIN code as backup plan. However, each company took a different approach with their smart lock designs.

Earlier smart locks, such as those made by Schlage and Yale were based on Z-Wave and Zigbee and were integrated into smart home platforms. However, multiple newer types of smart locks began appearing in 2013, offering direct control and user authentication from a smartphone app. These locks use Bluetooth Smart and WiFi connectivity to make the authentication process more convenient; the protocols are supported by most smartphones, which makes it easier to detect proximity with users carrying key-replacement devices.

The August Smart Lock was funded by angels and designed by Swiss designer Yves Behar. Users can control and manage the lock with an iOS, Android, or web app. Guests who have received a virtual key are able to unlock the August Smart Lock with their smartphones. Users can set the duration for which a virtual key is active, or manually disable them at any time. In addition to recording a visitation log, the lock also send a push notifi cation to a user's smartphone when guests go in or come out of the house.

Lockitron was the first smart lock to be successfully crowdfunded, although multiple design and manufacturing problems have delayed its shipping date long past its originally scheduled one, during which multiple competitors have sprung up and some have beat them to the market. It is a simple smart lock that fi ts directly over an existing deadbolt on the back of a door and is unlocked with a smartphone.

Users can also grant access to friends, family and guests through the app. The lock itself connects to a home network using WiFi, so it can send you notifi cations no matter where you are. Users with smartphones supporting Bluetooth Smart will see the door unlock automatically when an authorized device is in its range of detection. Goji was successfully crowdfunded on Indiegogo. When released, it will offer an additional option to open one's door through customer service representatives, who will be available 24/7. Aside from sending virtual keys, proximity-based unlocking and smartphonecontrolled operations, the smart lock can also snap a photo whenever someone is at the door and sends photo and text alerts to a user's smartphone; it also records all activities and makes the logs available through the Goji smartphone or web app. The Goji Smart lock replaces an existing deadbolt rather than retrofi t onto one and has high-tech-looking units on both the interior and exterior sides of the door.

The exterior-facing unit can display text and be opened to reveal a keyhole for physical keys. Kwikset Kevo debuted on the American reality competition series Shark Tank. Powered by UniKey and back by lock incumbent Kwikset, Kevo was the first of newer types of smart locks on the market. Kevo detects ekeys through Bluetooth, and its tap-to-open feature is a convenient way to open doors. Users do not receive notifi cations each time the door is unlocked, but can look up the lock's complete access history on the smartphone app. “A simple touch of the lock initiates verification between the smart device and the lock, unlocking or locking as a result. The user is no longer required to fi sh for keys, unload packages, pizzas or children from arms, said Dirk Wyckoff, VP of Sales and Marketing of UniKey Technologies. “On top of that, an administrator of the lock can send and delete additional eKeys for access to other people, determine the parameters of usage for those people (time or day, etc.), all without ever surrendering a physical key.”

Smart locks released by two other lock giants Schlage and Yale take a more conservative approach, but then they have been offering these locks for a much longer time. Both feature touchscreen number pads that look bulky and old-school, and do not provide flashy features like the other smart locks do. Both companies offer ZigBee and Z-Wave versions of their locks, which work well with many smart home systems. “We believe that while the smart and connected lock market today is largely Z-Wave and Zigbee based,” said Wolf. “There will be strong demand in coming years for newer direct-connect smart and cloud-connected locks using other radio interfaces."

IS NFC BECOMING A NONFACTOR IN THE SMART HOME?

NFC technology is highly secure and has a better overall power management profile than low energy Bluetooth, and there are clear use cases for the technology in a variety of security, access control, authentication and identification. A few years ago, it seemed like NFC was a serious technology to watch across a number of different segments. The most obvious was retail and payments, where Google threw its support behind NFC as a key technology for contactless payments. As a result, many retailers installed thousands of contactless payment systems with NFC technology over the last five years.

While Google was supportive, the other half of today's modern mobile duopoly has not been. Apple hasn't integrated the technology, at least not yet, and hasn't made clear whether they have any plans to do so anytime soon. Big retailers have been cautious about the technology without Apple's support, and some retailers, like Starbucks, have opted for alternatives like Square card readers. New alternatives and Apple's lack of support has led to waning interest in NFC as a retail payment technology, and recently some retailers who had installed it have actually started to disable the NFC capabilities.

In 2011 Yale, one of the big-three lock makers, announced they would integrate NFC into one their electronic locks and even demoed it at CES 2013, but they never released a NFC-integrated lock and based on my conversations with the company, it doesn't look like one is imminent.

Lockitron, a smart lock startup does have NFC in its forthcoming smart lock, but this is the only one of the new-generation smart locks that I know of with NFC integrated. However, the company is struggling to get locks out to its crowdfunded backers, and even if they do its not clear that this will give any momentum to NFC as an authentication technology for smart locks. Still, even with these few bright spots, it doesn't look to me like we're seeing significant interest in NFC in today's smart home. News in January that Apple had filed a patent for an NFC/Bluetooth LE/Wi-Fi usage in unified mobile payment implementation is a dim sparkle of hope on the horizon, because I think if Apple moves into NFC it could revive the technology. And, by extension, widespread adoption of NFC into iOS devices could give some much needed momentum to NFC in the smart home as well.

CONSTRAINTS
While advances in mechanical door locks have made them more secure over the past few thousand years, the relationship between people, doors and door locks have not changed: person + key = entry. With residential doors locks now incorporating IT and wireless connectivity, it seems possible that this relationship can be more convenient, efficient and secure. Perhaps locks can even be built-in to the doors, removing the need for a door knob. However, even though locks are no longer constrained by the complications of mechanical designs, it will be a while before radical changes will be affordable to most people.

The idea of futuristic doors that automatically open and close are nothing new; they can be seen in retail stores, hospitals, offi ce buildings and more. The problem is they are still too expensive for most homeowners, more so when security is added into the mix. “An automated system of your front door opening automatically on your approach in the manner you live your life with the affordable technology present today is not reality,” Wyckoff said. There are also other problems that have yet to be solved in products that cater to the average consumer. “Can every front door be aligned and insulated properly? What are suitable jams and thresholds? How about power availability?” Wyckoff asked. “Yes, but not at an acceptable cost to the masses. When addressing the mass market, we must respect what their front door looks like; in North America, it's a traditional door with a deadbolt cylindrical tubular lock. That door may swell with the seasons. That door may not quite latch properly and the deadbolt may even be used to simply hold it shut from a gentle breeze.”

“If I had a lot of extra money, there are materials and craftspeople that could install a very fancy entry system for me,” Wyckoff continued. “That system may not have UniKey's touch-to-open entry making it simple, but I bet it would be nice; I may just need to take out a second mortgage in order to pay for it. One of my kids may even have to forego college.”

MOVING FORWARD
The trade-off between what is possible and its cost of implementation places a limit at the front door, so it is safe to assume that the door itself will not go through any radical changes in the near future. However, the locks that are fitted onto the doors will see some interesting developments over the next few years. The standard key has worked for hundreds of years and is based on mature technology and manufacturing processes, making them cheap to produce and easy to replace. Smartphones, on the other hand, are much more expensive to replace—although opening the front door would probably be the least of a user's worries if the smartphone is misplaced. While it is unlikely that smartphones will replace mechanical keys in the near future, the introduction of smart locks show a glimmer of hope for better residential access control systems going mainstream.

 Video Doorphones Move Beyond Access Control
Video doorphones, or video intercoms, have evolved from mere entry management systems into into multifunctional devices that support network connectivity and home automation features. Video doorphones for smart home serve as the core of a smart home, integrating security, communication and home automation features. Video door phone systems generally comprises control monitors and and door stations with built-in megapixel cameras. Popular features consist of inter-building and remote communication, access control and guest monitoring.

However, manufacturers have a hard time differentiating their products from those of competitors because the industrial design needs to be conservative to be compatible with many types of decor and cannot follow design trends because product life is often tens of years. New features are also difficult to introduce because the system needs to be reliable. According to Amroad, “when functions are very similar, establishing a positive emotional connection with users is the key. Hence, design and quality are an important driver to differentiate a brand from another. Making durable products, from the aesthetical and material point of view, is essential. “Deployment is another big differentiation factor. Right now, installing these products is difficult, time-consuming, expensive. It is a task that can be completed only by highly trained technicians. However, in the next few months well designed systems will allow for quick and reliable installations in a matter of minutes, resulting in lower prices for clients and more efficient maintenance.”

Burn baby burn: Southeast Asia's fire market fires up

Burn baby burn: Southeast Asia's fire market fires up

Editor / Provider: William Pao, a&s Asia | Updated: 8/15/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Southeast Asia's fire market is set for impressive growth, driven by various positive factors including the region's economic expansion and more stringent regulations, which have led to stronger demand. Meanwhile, end users are looking for better and more cutting-edge technology, which includes wireless and IP solutions.

The fire and safety market has never grown out of style as people attach significant importance to the protection of life and property. Recent estimates by Research and Markets estimate that the global fire safety market will grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 13.9 percent from 2013 to 2018, when the market size is expected to reach US$66.6 billion.

Among the places where growth in fire equipment and products are especially noticeable are Southeast Asia countries, including Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Vietnam. According to estimates by Frost & Sullivan, Southeast Asia's fire safety market will grow at a CAGR of 8.1 percent between now and 2017, reaching a size of $548.3 million by that year. “Yes, no doubt the Asian fire and safety market is set to grow successfully,” said Robin Chen, Marketing Manager of Lightak.

Economic Expansion
The upbeat sentiment certainly has to do with Southeast Asia's economy, which is on a roll. A recent survey from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development indicated that Southeast Asia economies will grow at a CAGR of 5.4 percent between now and 2018. Among them, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam will record high growth rates of 6 percent, 5.8 percent and 5.4 percent, respectively, over the next five years.

This expansion has led to a construction boom in the region and increased incomes for citizens, who now attach greater importance to fire safety. “There is definitely a stronger need for asset and life protection,” said Chen.

Regulations Trigger Demand
Tighter regulations on fire safety in Southeast Asia have also triggered demand for products. In Thailand, for example, fire alarm is law. Every building has to have fire alarm systems, according to Suwong Ratchawong, Fire Safety Technical Manager for Thailand at Siemens Ltd., Building Technologies Division.

Adds Warodom Sucharitakul, MD of Shinaracha Frotector, a Thailand-based fire protection consulting firm: “Fire safety systems are required in buildings higher than 23 meters or bigger than 10,000 square meters. There are also requirements that maintenance programs for fire safety systems be done in factories.”

Other Southeast Asian countries also have similar codes. In India, all buildings 15 meters in height or above must have a control room on the entrance floor of the building with communication systems to all floors. In Singapore, every floor of a building with height of 24 meters or above is required to have a water sprinkler system. These regulations create business opportunities for suppliers eyeing the Southeast Asia market.

Technological Trends
An increase in fire safety awareness in the region has led to growing interest in more sophisticated fire safety technology, for example addressable panels, wireless, and IP.

Addressable Panels
Addressable fire control panels hold several key advantages over conventional ones. In a conventional panel, which remains popular due to its lower cost, up to 80 loops can be included, with each loop connecting 20 to 30 devices such as detectors and call points. The drawback is that it can only identify the zone where is a fire may be taking place. An addressable fire control panel, on the other hand, can have hundreds of devices connected to a loop, each with its own unique address that enables the panel to recognize the exact location of the fire.

“There are more applications of addressable fire alarm systems from residential complexes to commercial projects, indicating increased demand and need for more precise detection,” said Henry Shaw, Overseas Manager at Horing Lih Industrial. According to the company, its addressable control panel can have a maximum of 32 loops, each able to connect with 250 addressable devices. That's a total of 8,000 addressable points.

Wireless
Besides the more mature fire safety solutions, Southeast Asian users are also exploring new technologies, for example wireless and IP. In the words of Lightak's Chen, there is definitely strong interest in these technologies, especially among those who can afford them. “In India, for instance, you've got lots of noblemen. These are the people who need protection the most,” he said.

Wireless fire products are those that require no wiring between devices and the panel. Examples include wireless alarms and detectors, which are becoming more prevalent in the market. “Wi-Fi is suitable for particular projects. For example, you have two or three buildings, and the distance between building and building may be 800 meters, making it quite difficult to lay cable or fiber optic,” Ratchawong said. “Also, for antique buildings, they cannot dig roads and put in fiber optic. That's when they can use Wi-Fi.”

IP
IP-based fire equipment is another phenomenon that has picked up steam in Southeast Asia. According to a recent report by IHS, a main reason for the technology's growing acceptance is its ability to connect with other devices in home automation systems. “Here, buildings are integrating fire equipment with building management, security, and lighting equipment to improve operational efficiencies and have fewer people reviewing and monitoring the information,” the report said.

Ratchawong corroborated IHS's observation. “Information technology like the Internet is already coming to Southeast Asia. Most of the owners and end users would like to incorporate fire alarm system into these technologies, like control panels communicating with each other through the Internet,” he said.

With new technologies emerging, it's important for suppliers to keep up with the changing market taste to ensure best business results. “Manufacturers always have to follow exactly what's needed by the customer,” said Lee Ran-huang, GM of Ching Gu Electronics. “You must also have a vision of what will be needed five to ten years later.”

Challenges
Price will continue to be a challenge for suppliers in the Southeast Asian market, where competition is fierce due mainly to cutthroat price war waged by Chinese manufacturers, who offer products at super low prices and in the process push out other players.

While smaller manufacturers find it hard to survive in this environment, larger companies respond by offering products with superior quality and functionality. Siemens, for example, has come up with products with intelligence in it. “Our detector has a microprocessor inside, with which it can make decisions on whether there is real fire, or it's just false alarm,” said Ratchawong.

Another challenge, in particular for smaller companies, is requirement that products be certified by international certification bodies like UL and FM. In large government or private projects, certified products must be used, and suppliers who can provide them have a better chance to win the contract. These suppliers tend to be larger companies who can afford the huge certification fees.

Rosy Prospects
Challenges aside, the Southeast Asia fire market is set for remarkable growth that can't be ignored. Regional economic expansion, the growing importance that people attach to safety, and the adoption of new fire technologies all contribute to rosy prospects for Southeast Asia's fire market down the road. The popular catchphrase “Burn, baby, burn” indeed encapsulates the sentiment that both manufacturers and users have for the market.

TOP10 most popular security products for July 2014

TOP10 most popular security products for July 2014

Editor / Provider: Michelle Chu | Updated: 8/15/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

asmag.com is honored to disclose the TOP10 for July 2014, as the summer has hit the record-high temperature all around the world!

Let's go through the award list in July quickly:

There are 7 manufacturers making it into the TOP10 ranking in July. Although this is not the first enter for most of the companies, every product on the list is definitely new face in town!

Bosch, Dahua, and Hikvision are taking two seats respectively, while others go to ioteo, Nextchip, Samsung, and VIVOTEK. Among these awarded suppliers, most of the suppliers are coming from Asia – Dahua and Hikvision from China; VIVOTEK from Taiwan; Nextchip and Samsung from Korea. On the other hand, couple of leading European providers, Bosch Security Systems and ioteo, are seen in this list, taking three seats in total.

Taken as a whole, the TOP10 for July has shown a wide and diverse interests from the visitors; nevertheless, it is obvious that smart home applications have made up half of the list, suggesting that the Internet of Things and smart home market show a promising aspect. Camera wise, dome cameras, mini-cam, and devices come with PTZ function are most favored. Interestingly, this is the first time that a Wi-Fi camera included in TOP10. Apart from cameras and DVR, touch screen keypad, AHD, and smart home solution can also be seen in the ranking in July.

1. Dahua Smart Home Solution


Drum roll please, ladies and gentlemen! The crown of the TOP10 for July has finally given to a different player! Dahua Smart Home Solution took a total of 462-click in one month, climbing to the top of the ranking in July. Asian visitors has contributed almost half of the credit with 201 clicks; readers from America takes up about one third of the crowds.

Dahua Smart Home Solution adopts TCP/IP protocol, integrating video intercom, home security, remote control, and alarm systems altogether. This product enables the users to remotely control the systems via smart devices and watch real-time monitoring.

*While smart home market becomes blooming, Dahua Smart Home solution, the new comer in smart home business, is definitely a big challenge to players in the industry. For the review of smart home seminar held by a&s SMAhome Magazine in August, please check here.

2. ioteoCam Wi-Fi camera


With 434-clicks in total running behind as the second place, ioteoCam Wi-Fi camera got the second place in July, showing equal popularities from America, Asia, and Europe areas – Asia received 138-click; America 134; Europe 131.

ioteoCam features cloud management, cloud storage, inccidents notification, and 5-miniute easy setup, allowing users to view live streaming video and play-back recording from smart devices directly from anywhere anytime. This intuitive device is perfectly made for users from homes and small businesses verticals.

3. VIVOTEK FD8168 Ultra-mini Fixed Dome Network Camera


The thrid place of the TOP10 for July goes to VIVOTEK FD8168 Ultra-mini Fixed Dome Network Camera, taking an amount of 403 clicks from all around the world – 35% coming from American area; 28% and 29% from Asian and European countries respectively.

This VIVOTEK 2-megapixel ultra-mini fixed dome provides real-time recording under a resolution of 1280x720, and 15 frames per second at 1920x1080. It may be super-mini, but nothing comes less within it. Featuring easy installation, and other than that, this camera is also embedded with MicroSD/SDHC/SDXC card slot for on-board storage.

4. Samsung Techwin SNP-6320H 2MP Full HD Network PTZ


The 2-megapixel full HD network PTZ by Samsung, SNP-6320H, is seated at the fourth place with 319-click in July. This Samsung's latest full HD PTZ draws a wide interest from the american visitors, taking up almost half of the overall click-through rate. Falling right behind is Asia (31%), as the readers from European countries only take up 17%.

This IP66-rated network PTZ is equipped with 32x optical and 16x digital zoom lens and embedded with H.264 dual codec, fearuting functions not only Day & Night mode, wide dynamic range, but also auto tracking, intelligent video analytics, bi-directional audio support.

To get a&s‘ latest collection of high speed dome cameras, please click here.

5. Dahua 7224/7232L 24/32CH 960H Standalone DVR


Falling slightly behind, Dahua 960H Standalone DVR, the second triumph of Dahua in July, takes the fifth place with 315-click, gaining the most click-through rate, 147 clicks, from American readers; whereas 33% comes from Asia and 21% from Europe.

This Dahua 960H standalone DVR features 1080p realtime preview, supporting all channel real time recording and simultaneous realtime playback and multiple network monitoring. This 960H DVR model has 3D intelligent positioning with Dahua PTZ dome cameras.

6. Hikvision DS-2CD2Q10FD-IW 1MP Mini IR PT Camera


The sixth place goes to Hikvision Mini IR PT Camera, DS-2CD2Q10FD, obtaining a popularity of 310-click from the visitors all around the world – American areas take up 44% by 134 clicks; 38% is coming from Asia; 15% is dedicated by European.

This adorable-looking cam from Hikvision features HD720p real-time video recording, PIR detection (line-crossing detection etc.), IR LEDs at a distance up to 10-meter, and motorized pan/tilt rotation.

7. Bosch AUTODOME 7000HD Dome Camera


The seventh honor of the TOP10 for July 2014 goes to Bosh AUTODOME 7000HD Dome Camera. Clicks-through rate from American region accounts up to 50% of the total 307-click; whereas Asia and Europe share other 43% with 130 clicks.

This high-resolution full HD PTZ camera by Bosch delivers real-time surveillance video at 1080p, coming along with 20x dome just in case the users need more detail in the picture. Furthermore, this PTZ camera is equipped with intelligent tracking with on-board Intelligent Video Analytics (IVA).

8. Nextchip AHD(Analog High Definition)


Nextchip Analog High Definition has aroused high attention of the Asian visitors with 161 clicks, marking more than 50% of the total click-through rate; in the mean time, guests from American and European countries got about other 140 clicks in total.

Analog High Definition (AHD) is an alternative standard for HD data transmission solution which is trending now. AHD1.0 Tx/Rx transmits data of 720p at 25fps or 30fps with minimized data loss, supporting COMET and CVBS simultaneously.

*AHD, along with HDCVU, and HDTVI, are seen as the popular potential solutions for analog market. Just early in this August, Dahua makes a significant step, partnering with HDcctv Alliance to promote its patented HDCVI technology, which is expected to increase its interoperability among brands of devices. For story of Dahua's strategic decision, please see here.

9. Hikvision DS-2DF1-57A 1.3MP Network Speed Dome


The ninth of TOP10 ranking for July is taken by Hikvision DS-2DF1-57A 1.3MP Network Speed Dome, Hikvision's second awarded product in July, with a total of 281-click. As a majority of 45% of the click-through rate is coming from American areas, visitors from Europe and Asia take up even more as a whole with 48%.

This 1.3MP Speed Dome is embedded with H.264 video impression techonology, coming with wide dynamic range function and enabling the end users to record pictures of 25fps at 720p. Meanwhile, users have options of 18x optical or 12x digital zoom.

10. Bosch B942 Touch Screen Keypad


Only couple clicks behind the previous awardee, Bosch B942 Touch Screen Keypad, as the second product by Bosch included within the ranking for July, received 279 clicks in last month. A definate majority of the visitors are coming from American areas; Asian and European regions take up about 40%, while Africa and Oceania is less than 10% in total.

This keypad by Bosch gives prominence to its beautiful modern design and color graphic touch screen display, and with the built-in presence detector, the light gose on automatically when user approaches the keypad. Instead of merely using pass code, this system allows use of a token as replacement; or for use with dual authentication for higher security.

 

* Please note that the above statistics are not based on the sum of clicks but the accumulation of IP addresses. 
For last month's TOP10 products, click here.

Exacq hires regional sales manager for Northeast US

Exacq hires regional sales manager for Northeast US

Editor / Provider: Exacq | Updated: 8/15/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Exacq has announced that Jay Mele has accepted the position of Regional Sales Manager (RSM) for the Northeast US. Jay's territory includes Massachusetts, Connecticut, Vermont, Maine, Rhode Island, New York, Northern New Jersey, and New Hampshire. He will report directly to Adam Messina, Northeast Regional Sales Director.

Jay Mele brings over 10 years of sales experience supporting the Northeast security industry. Jay specializes in IP video including cameras, video management software, analytics, network infrastructure, and storage, along with product knowledge and experience with access control, intrusion, and fire detection. His background includes working within sales and business development roles for industry leading manufacturers, most recently Axis Communications. Jay has the technical aptitude to sell and support complex systems and prides himself on problem solving and customer support skills.

Axis: solutions for a new level of security in public transport

Axis: solutions for a new level of security in public transport

Editor / Provider: Axis Communications | Updated: 8/14/2014 | Article type: Security 50

We all want to feel safe and secure, it's a basic human need. It comes way before in the hierarchy of needs than esteem or self-actualisation. However, we all perceive that security differently. There are cultural and geographical differences in this perception and also a correlation to the actual level of security based on the individual's knowledge of the situation or based on the sequence of events that have occurred historically.

Surveillance is a tool that public transport transit authorities can use to both manage the present security level, in terms of reducing incidents and crime and also to address passengers' fears concerning safety and security on the transport network. Used proactively in real-time, rather than merely recording the footage, camera surveillance is one dimension for security managers to consider when building a security system.

Another dimension is how camera usage is communicated to both staff and passengers. If people are aware of the benefits and the level of camera usage and incident reduction, then this has an impact on both deterring potential criminals and raising the ‘perceived' level of security for everyone.

In Sweden, Stockholm‘s transit authority, called Storstockholms Lokaltrafik (SL), worked with TV channel, Kanal 5, for three seasons on a documentary where viewers can follow the security operators in the security centre and watch how they interact with the people on the ground responding to the incidents.

Each episode documents how a number of different incidents are dealt with by security operators, private security personnel and the emergency services and how modern network video cameras are at the centre of the response.

In Spain, the Madrid bus transportation authority (EMT), installed a real-time surveillance system that is capable of viewing camera footage remotely from all their buses following an incident. Journalists were invited to a demonstration of the system and they then published details of it across major Madrid newspapers and TV stations so that the public could learn about it and understand all about the increased incident-handling capacity and improvements to the level of security for both passengers and staff.

The main goal in any incident management system is to not overreact or underestimate any incident when it occurs and to use the right resources early on to reduce the number of incidents or avoid them entirely.

An incident lifecycle
The incident lifecycle can be characterised in five or six distinct steps:

Detection → Prioritisation → Response → Re-prioritisation → Investigation → Follow-up

Detection
This is the phase where an incident happens and is discovered. Incidents can be discovered manually when for example a passenger reports the incident via phone to the security centre, or it can be done automatically through automatic video analysis by a modern network video camera system. Examples of automatic video analysis could include overcrowding on platforms or entry into a restricted area or entry onto the rail tracks. Other types of sensors can also alert the security centre of an incident, like fire and smoke alarms, access controls and radar or other motion sensors.

Prioritisation
Once the incident is detected, it needs to be prioritised in terms of what the nature of it is. This information is then prioritised against all other activities that response personnel are currently occupied with. By using high quality video from network video cameras, operators can make an informed assessment in real-time of the incident from a remote location and decide on the appropriate action.

Response
Once the incident is fully understood by the security operators, it can be classified to follow a protocol; a set of operating procedures that have been determined beforehand in order to defuse and minimise the situation. The security centre can continually use network video to monitor how the scene potentially escalates and develops.

Furthermore, as modern network video cameras provide crisp, clear HDTV-quality video, not only can operators recognise what is currently happening they can also clearly identify the individual(s) involved. It is vital in a real-time situation to give a clear description of a perpetrator or someone in need of help (ie. clothing, height, body shape etc.) to allow the response to be quickly co-ordinated. With older camera technologies this was not really possible in many situations, but now it is. The handover between the security centre and response personnel can be made via radio, but network video also provides the ability to send live video streams to mobile devices wirelessly.

Network video cameras are based on open standards and run on any IP based network. Specifically, network video compressions like H.264, make it easy to broadcast video streams from the scene over cellular networks into the response unit's vehicles etc.

Re-prioritisation
Sometimes an initial response to an incident is made with vague or limited information at hand. Sequences of events that have happened shortly before detection of the incident need to be reviewed and operators have to create a picture of the situation.

Another scenario may happen during an incident, when a suspect leaves the scene before responders have arrived. In these types of situations when a new priority or re-prioritisation needs to be established, network video is instrumental in keeping everyone informed.

Furthermore, live and recorded video from other nearby locations can be used to continue the search for people involved and help responders be in the right place. Key to any successful response is the speed of that response and here network video also plays a central role in reprioritisation of incidents.

Investigation
After an incident is dealt with, there usually follows a period of investigation where the facts are established and the sequence of actions reported to the authorities. Video evidence is key as it helps to show the actual scenario from many different angles. By using modern network cameras, the image quality is the same as the HDTV broadcasts we are accustomed to at home. Positively identifying people where there can be no doubt of who did what and when, is a vital benefit to any investigation process.

Especially critical are environments like stations and depots in low-light or very bright-light where traditional cameras have difficulties. Modern network video cameras have the ability to enhance any available light to create a lighter picture and also to expose the bright light and shadows independently in a very light scene so that all details become more visible. Axis Communications with its Lightfinder and WDR (Wide Dynamic Range) technologies is leading the market in this field.

Follow-up
The final phase is the step of follow-up and learning. Here video can be used to review real incidents with staff and security partners in order for them to discuss and learn from the footage. By working this way, both newer staff members as well as experienced personnel can together create a learning organisation.

Proactive video use with centralised surveillance in real-time
To create a new level of security for public transport, centralised, real-time surveillance and the ability to coordinate response personnel is key to minimising the impact of incidents and increase the perception of security. Network video has a clear role to play in all phases of modern incident management. By carefully applying intelligent video where cameras analyse the video, security operators will also benefit from an additional detection mechanism to detect incidents early and thereby increasing their ability to respond to an incident successfully before it escalates out of control.

- by Patrik Anderson, Director Business Development Transportation, Axis Communications

Smile! Germany's largest owner-operated perfume chain adopts Geutebruck solutions

Smile! Germany's largest owner-operated perfume chain adopts Geutebruck solutions

Editor / Provider: Geutebruck | Updated: 8/11/2014 | Article type: Security 50

If it has value, it will be stolen. This holds especially true for luxury and lifestyle products. For this reason, Geutebruck provides security solutions for Stadt-Parfümerie Pieper outlets, Germany's largest owner-operated perfume chain.

Founded in 1931 as "Seifen Pieper", today the company offers a wide range of branded products. None of the big names are missing. The 130 perfumeries sell the highest quality products, presenting perfume, cosmetics, toiletries and extensive beauty accessories in an attractive setting. The offer is not only popular, but also very "hands on" and thus relatively easily stolen. The company has tackled this problem with a video security concept that is based on deterrence as well as the efficient resolution of theft. Wellmann security technology has designed a modern security concept for this application, which was transferred relatively easily to all stores. The majority of the projects is now complete, all others are in the works. On average, 10 to 16 cameras were installed in each perfumery. Each camera was positioned to capture critical areas. This is not done secretively, but rather as ostentatiously as possible! As soon as customers enter the store they see the multi-monitor operation in the entrance, providing an effective deterrent to potential thieves.

Geutebruck's video security system is in operation 365 days a year, 24 hours a day. To ensure that images are recorded at the right time, the recordings are initiated based on events. This tool is called "Activity Detection". The images are stored locally on re_porter, Geutebruck's business surveillance system. If an incident occurs, the security control center at the company's headquarters can retrieve data remotely. In this case, image analysis tools facilitate the retrieval of relevant sequences. Credit card fraud, for instance, is a relatively common occurrence. Every policy inquiry with date, time and location initiates a search procedure that quickly provides clear results. The corresponding video sequence is found quickly and is provided to the police on a data storage medium. The images make it possible to identify the offender and provide proof of the payment process at the EC terminal. Because the video data is tamper-proof and is admissible in court, the situation can get uncomfortable for the crooks. In this case, smiling when "paying" does little to help.

Thermal imaging cameras: A cost-effective solution for perimeter protection

Thermal imaging cameras: A cost-effective solution for perimeter protection

Editor / Provider: Sponsored by FLIR | Updated: 8/11/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Today, the challenge for CCTV professionals is to make sure that video footage is effective on a 24/7 basis, 365 days a year. Securing an area during the daytime is one thing. But what happens during the night? And in weather conditions like fog, rain and snow? What can be detected if CCTV cameras are blinded by the sun?

As CCTV systems become more advanced, the security industry will increasingly focus on CCTV installations for 24 hour surveillance, not just day-time operation. To be truly secure, a site must be protected day and night.

A number of tools are available to help detect potential intruders in the dark. Often different technologies are being combined to create a secure perimeter. Fences can be complemented with Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) systems with or without active infrared illumination or old fashioned light bulbs, Radio Frequency Intruder Detection (RAFID) systems, thermal imaging cameras and/or walking patrols. Whatever solution or technology is chosen for securing an area, they all have their advantages and disadvantages and some technologies are more expensive than others. To get a full picture of the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) for a certain solution, not only the initial purchase cost, but also the installation and maintenance costs need to be considered. Some solutions consume a lot of power and need a lot of spare parts. Environmental and energy consumption issues are high on the global agenda today. Given that $1 from every $5 spent globally is used on lighting, and much of this is spent on inefficient and unnecessary lighting, particular attention should be paid to this area. Saving energy by looking at running costs will become increasingly important. Local authorities and private industries are all looking at methods to save energy costs and lighting is one area that will receive due attention.

Quite a number of technologies are available to help detect potential intruders in the dark before they become a real hazard. Let's compare some of them:

The total cost of seeing at night

Closed-circuit television (CCTV) combined with traditional lighting
CCTV systems have been an effective tool for security and surveillance applications. However, just like the human eye, CCTV cameras do not see too much in total darkness. So in order to detect intruders at night they are often complemented with traditional lights by mains driven bulbs. Although some bulbs (fluorescent lamps, HID lamps) are more efficient than others, the operational cost remains very high. Light can only penetrate a certain distance and completely illuminating an area, so that it can be kept under surveillance of CCTV cameras, is not always possible. Powering and maintaining the lights can even be more costly.

CCTVs with traditional lamp lighting require lamp replacement every 2,000 to 4,000 hours or about every 8 months. Significant labour and material costs are associated with lamp replacement. Light pollution is a global problem caused by inefficient, intrusive and unnecessary use of artificial light. Symptoms include glare, clutter over-illumination and sky glow. Light pollution is an increasingly hot political topic given recent government legislation to control and punish light pollution. In some locations light is also considered to be too intrusive.

Furthermore, lighting essentially lays out a route of attack for intruders, creating shadows in which they can hide and access undetected.

Closed-circuit television (CCTV) combined with LEDs
Compared to any bulb, LEDs provide significant savings on electrical consumption. LEDs also provide long life performance with little ongoing maintenance costs.
Infrared illumination with LEDs, sometimes also called active infrared, beams infrared radiation into the area in front of a camera. The LEDs are often placed around the lens of the camera.
LED illumination is compromised by limited range performance. Also, providing lighting for domes has long been a challenge for CCTV professionals as the lighting cannot be fitted to move with the camera.

Electrified fences
In order to keep intruders out of certain areas, fences can be constructed. To further increase security, fences can be equipped with sensors that generate an automatic alarm when someone touches the fence. Or they can be electrified, to keep intruders away.
In all cases, fences need to be complemented, for example by CCTV cameras or walking patrols in order to see what is happening around the fence.

Radio Frequency Intruder detection (RAFID)
The simplest description of RAFID is to consider a system using two specially designed cables – one transmitting a radio wave, while the other receives that wave.
Changes in the amount of signal passing between the transmitter cable and receiver cable are analyzed by a signal processor. These changes indicate that someone or something is between the two cables, which will make an alarm go off. Due to the difference in signal strength, the system can detect whether these changes are due to the presence of a human, or a small animal. Note that in a lot of cases CCTV cameras still need to be installed in order to see what is generating a real, or false, alarm.

Thermal imaging 
A new tool for seeing in total darkness, and in extreme weather conditions, is thermal imaging. Thermal imaging is the use of a thermal imaging camera to "see" thermal energy emitted from an object. Thermal imaging cameras produce images of invisible infrared or "heat" radiation. Based on temperature differences between objects, thermal imaging produces a crisp image on which the smallest of details can be seen. They work both during daytime and nighttime. Thermal imaging is today widely recognized as the most effective detection solution and when used in conjunction with video analytics it is confirmed having the lowest false alarm rate and most accurate intrusion detection solution in the market.

Most FLIR Systems thermal imaging cameras contain an uncooled Vanadium Oxide detector. Not only does this produce excellent quality thermal images, since it is not containing any moving parts, it needs virtually no maintenance. Thermal imaging technology requires no additional lighting or illumination and has no regular maintenance costs. The FC series camera is now available with it's own onboard analytics, this creating a true edge detection device , both benefits of Thermal imaging and Video analytics are housed in the same camera.

Deciding which technology to use

Before making a final decision about which technology will be implemented to secure a perimeter at night, security managers should have a look at the advantages and disadvantages of each technology. This is outlined in the table below.  

 

Advantages

Disadvantages

CCTV with traditional

lighting or LED

- Good visibility during daytime

- Relatively low initial cost

- A lot of cameras need to be installed to cover a large perimeter

- Limited detection at night. Light illuminates only certain small area.

- Limited capabilities in fog, rain,

- Civil works need to be carried out to install light poles

- High power consumption

- High maintenance cost for replacing the lights: material and manpower

Electrified Fence

- Creates a physical barrier

- Allows to stop intruders

- Works during the night as well

- High installation cost

- Full civil works needed

- Power consumption

- Needs to be complemented with CCTV to see if alarm is false or not.

Light or infrared illumination needed during the night to do this.

RAFID or Sensor Cable

- Fully automated system

- Works in total darkness

- High installation cost

- Full civil works needed

- Troubleshooting and maintenance after installation

- Many unwanted alarms

- Needs to be complemented with CCTV to see if alarm is false or not.

Light or infrared illumination needed during the night to do this.

Thermal imaging

- Full awareness

- Can be used day and night

- Works in practically all weather conditions.

Can see through light fog, rain, smoke, ...

- No downtime, low maintenance

- Low power consumption

- Extremely difficult to hide from since thermal contrast is practically impossible to mask

-Excellent cueing sensor for high powered zoom PANT TILT SYSTEMS

- No physical barrier

- Potential intruders are easily spotted but not identified

Case study : lower investment for thermal imaging
As is shown in the advantages and disadvantages table on the previous page, thermal imaging cameras have many advantages for perimeter protection. To make a final decision, however, the purchase cost of the system needs to be considered. Below you'll find a comparison between the required number of units for perimeter protection systems based on CCTV cameras versus systems based on thermal imaging cameras. In this simplified example, the cost of personnel and equipment during the installation and the cost in maintenance and power bills are not included, as they might vary strongly depending on available infrastructure, local power rates and local wages. In all cases these costs will be directly proportional to the amount of equipment and on the usage of lighting. Even though the price of one single thermal imaging camera might be higher than the price of a CCTV camera, the overall investment costs for a thermal imaging camera perimeter protection system is actually lower, in this case 28% lower. The larger the perimeter, the bigger this difference will become. Since thermal imaging cameras require no lighting to function and given the fact that fewer cameras are needed with the thermal imaging perimeter protection solution, this system will also consume less electricity than the CCTV solution, making the thermal solution less expensive in its upkeep than the CCTV solution.

Assumptions:
- An industrial perimeter of 700 meters needs to be protected with the perimeter protection system.
- The perimeter needs to be secured day and night, in all weather conditions. This means that CCTV cameras are limited in terms of distance that can be covered by the infrared illuminators.

Even though the price of one single thermal imaging camera is higher than the price of a CCTV camera, in this example the total investment costs for a thermal imaging camera perimeter protection system is 38% lower.

Conclusion
Although all technologies have advantages and disadvantages a small calculation makes it clear that thermal imaging is a very good and a very cost effective solution for protecting a perimeter, especially if this perimeter, like in practically all cases, also needs to be protected during the night.
In this technical note, we have demonstrated that for thermal imaging systems, not only maintenance costs are lower (power, spare parts, etc.), but already the initial purchase cost of a thermal system is lower than a CCTV system.

Although a single thermal imaging camera is more expensive than a CCTV camera, fewer cameras need to be deployed to cover the same area. The civil works that need to be carried out are minimal. In some cases, the cameras can even be mounted on existing structures. Furthermore, since thermal imaging cameras produce a clear image in the darkest of nights, no complementary technologies like lighting or infrared illuminators need to be installed. Not only does this limit the amount of civil works that needs to be carried out, it also reduces the maintenance cost.

Thermal imaging cameras also generate fewer false alarms which is a common problem with CCTV cameras combined with Video Motion Detection or Video Content Analysis software.

 

 

Samsung Techwin WiseNetIII helps strength campus security

Samsung Techwin WiseNetIII helps strength campus security

Editor / Provider: Samsung Techwin | Updated: 8/8/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Kindergartens, nurseries, schools, colleges and universities need to be open and accessible. As such they are vulnerable to opportunistic thieves and vandals, as well as organised criminal gangs and terrorists, bringing children, students and staff into danger. Violent crime such as school shootings are making education authorities and parents rethink about the safety of children, whilst non-violent crimes such as burglary and vandalism are also of major concern.

A major investment in a security system is not something that schools would wish to repeat on a regular basis. They would therefore want to purchase a solution that is not just fit for today's purposes, but is also future proof in terms of its expandability and its ability to integrate with new technology which may become available in the future.

Solutions
Fortunately, technology has come to the rescue in the form of major advances in video surveillance, which can provide the education sector with valuable tools to create a safe and secure learning environment for their staff and students, as well as protecting their valuable assets. Samsung Techwin's latest generation of WiseNetIII IP video surveillance cameras and ‘plug & play' network recording devices, are revolutionising the way the education sector can capitalise on the benefits of a Video over IP system.

The open platform nature of the Samsung Techwin WiseNetIII DSP chipset cameras provides users with complete freedom to choose their perfect combination of video management software (VMS) and video analytics which best matches their individual requirements. For example, schools, colleges or universities could consider using the Foxstream video analytics App which is ideal for perimeter protection where there may be a need to have a high performance solution to detect and track would-be trespassers or truants. A key feature of the WiseNetIII DSP chipset is that it has the ability to run multiple applications simultaneously. Following the connection of a camera to the network, installers or operators simply need to upload their preferred Apps via the camera's browser.

Deter & Detect
Samsung Techwin WiseNetIII network cameras, with the new introduction of six 3-megapixel models, can cover a wide area such as a school playground, car park or sports field and allow operators to zoom in to view close up detail of any activity without ‘pixilation' appearing in the image. Evidence grade images can be captured of any criminal activity such as theft and vandalism, as well as help with the detection of unwanted visitors such as drug dealers.

With so many children nowadays living in single parent environments, the superb quality of the images which can be captured by Samsung Techwin WiseNetIII cameras can help avoid any disputes by enabling authorised members of staff to monitor, and if necessary, verify who has collected a child from the school. Equally important, issues can be quickly resolved which might arise through accusations of one child bullying another. Schools, colleges and universities also have a duty of care towards their staff to ensure they can be protected against any false accusations.

As an added benefit, these security technologies can be adapted to broader applications in an educational context, such as recording lessons or lectures for staff training, or used to tackle unruly behaviour in the classroom.

The Samsung Techwin 3-megapixel models also offer a lot more than just evidence quality images. They are equipped with a range of other features which allow operators to respond more effectively to any suspicious activity, incident or emergency such as the option to simultaneously transmit images at various resolutions and with a choice of compression technologies. This enables headteachers, facilities managers, or any other authorised staff members to simultaneously monitor live images at one location and record video evidence at another.

 

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