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March Networks video surveillance selected to protect ATM in Sweden

March Networks video surveillance selected to protect ATM in Sweden

Editor / Provider: March Networks | Updated: 10/22/2014 | Article type: Commercial Markets

March Networks®, a global provider of intelligent IP video solutions, has announced that Bankomat AB, one of Sweden's largest ATM services providers, has selected the company's high-performance 8000 Series Hybrid NVRs for advanced security and asset protection of a 2,200 ATM network, with an initial large-scale rollout slated for completion by the end of 2014.

Bankomat is co-owned by the five largest banks in the country: Danske Bank, Handelsbanken, Nordea, SEB and Swedbank, and has been gradually consolidating each financial institution's ATM network. Many of the ATMs previously had no video surveillance or relied on a variety of different vendor platforms.

Stanley Security, a March Networks certified partner, recommended the March Networks 8704 Hybrid NVR as the ideal platform for Bankomat, and is currently managing the rollout. The 8704 model is designed for space-constrained locations like an ATM and has optimised H.264 compression – unique to March Networks – that delivers detailed HD video and noticeably sharper images from legacy analogue cameras without impacting video storage requirements. The highly-reliable recording platform also features an internal backup battery guaranteeing a systematic shutdown in the event of a power failure, a variety of security features and up to 2 TB of onboard storage.

“The unique model offered by Stanley Security and March Networks delivers greater efficiencies for ATM oversight,” explained Bankomat Security Chief Peter Svahn. “The ATMs are equipped with between two and four cameras. Many of the sites have older analogue cameras, but a transition to IP technology is in the works. IP cameras give us much better quality, so there's no reason I can see to work with analogue equipment.”

Stanley Security, which is also responsible for managing and servicing the video solution and retrieving video at Bankomat's request, is using March Networks' Enterprise Service Manager (ESM) software for centralised control of all recorder programming.

“The decision to standardise on March Networks made sense,” said Anders Gustafsson, Stanley Security's Stockholm-based Vertical Segment Manager for banking. “They are a preferred vendor in the banking market because of the functionality of their systems, their ease of use and reliability. It's not often that we have to replace a March Networks recorder.”

Complementing the video security at each ATM is Stanley's Pacom access control system, which allows security operations personnel to remotely unlock ATM service doors for authorised armoured car staff. Integration with the March Networks system allows Stanley Security guards to access video at the location to keep an eye on the scene and alert law enforcement in the event of a holdup or unauthorised access.

N.America foodservice giant deployed March Networks surveillance systems

N.America foodservice giant deployed March Networks surveillance systems

Editor / Provider: March Networks | Updated: 9/26/2014 | Article type: Commercial Markets

Compass Group North America is a leading foodservice management company with annual sales over $12 billion and more than 200,000 associates. Its operating companies, including Morrison Healthcare, Bon Appétit Management, Levy Restaurants and Wolfgang Puck Catering, serve more than seven million meals a day in schools, hospitals, senior living communities, corporate campuses and sporting venues across the U.S. and Canada.

Headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, Compass Group North America has the privilege of serving such prestigious clients as Microsoft, IBM, United Technologies Corp., SAP, Louisiana State University, Texas A&M University and the District of Columbia Public Schools. In addition, Compass Group provides catering to special events such as the US Open and the Academy Awards.

The group's success in the foodservice business relies on getting a lot of things right —from procurement and logistics to the preparation of nutritious, palate-pleasing food. Dedicated, trustworthy associates and satisfied customers are critical, but so too are loss prevention and an effective means of operational oversight.

Compass Group North America began deploying March Networks video surveillance systems in 2008 and currently has them installed in some 300 foodservice sites.

Chris McDonald, Senior Vice-President of Loss Prevention, joined the group in April 2012 by which time its loss prevention strategy was “pretty much already in place,” he said. “I was familiar with several different video surveillance systems, but had never dealt with March Networks and wasn't familiar with its technology. However, it didn't take me long to become a big fan. We've had really good success with it.”

 Valuable Video Evidence
Compass Group has a mix of 8000 Series and 4000 C hybrid networked video recorders and uses both analog and IP cameras to cover cash registers, food storage areas and back doors. Loss prevention staff in Atlanta rely on a third-party exception reporting system to alert them to potentially suspicious point-of-sale (POS) transactions and use the March Networks video surveillance system to view the associated video.

Performance metrics are also tracked to alert management to potential issues.

“For example, if we see that we're buying more food than we're producing, we'll start watching video,” said McDonald.

Unusual sales patterns are also cause for concern, prompting loss prevention staff to pay special attention to no-sales, voids and other potentially suspicious POS transactions flagged by the exception reporting system. Using video surveillance to view the actual transactions can provide McDonald's team with the evidence they need to take action against a dishonest cashier.

Video also allows the loss prevention team to monitor compliance with company policies for cashier accountability. As is the case in most retail environments, cashiers have their own cash drawers or unique log-ins which allow management to identify the cashier responsible for every transaction. Sharing log-ins defeats the purpose, but can be easily detected using video.

The same applies to the company's policy of always requiring two people present for cash counting during the completion of a shift, but as McDonald has discovered, having two people in the same room isn't always sufficient.

Video illustrating any lapses helps to improve compliance and is used by Compass Group for training purposes.

Operational Oversight
Traditionally, Compass Group has used video surveillance almost exclusively as a loss prevention tool, said McDonald. “We'd install cameras over the cash registers, the safe and the freezer door to make sure no one was stealing cash or inventory. There hasn't been a big focus on using video surveillance for operational oversight, but that's a direction we're moving in, especially with our Morrison Healthcare division.

“We're installing more cameras to provide us with an overview of the retail operation, the food preparation and dining areas and will be doing more video audits. Managers will be able to see, for example, if the salad bar is presentable after 12:30 in the afternoon and if the lettuce bowl is full — things like that, so even if they're offsite for the day, they'll be able to check in remotely on their laptops and see how things are going.”

Installing video surveillance systems in its foodservice locations can be complicated given the fact that Compass Group is typically operating under someone else's roof, explains McDonald.

There is also a wide range of scenarios — from seven day per week, public facing operations in a hospital, for example, to five day per week corporate cafés in restricted access campuses.

“Multiple permissions are invariably required to install video surveillance in one of our foodservice locations,” said McDonald. “We have to consult with HR, security and legal if we're capturing video of their employees. Then we have to go to IT because we have to pull cable. We try to demonstrate what we expect in terms of ROI and reduced number of incidents. We also sell them on the customer service benefit.”

This year alone, according to McDonald, 30 additional Compass Group sites have been equipped with March Networks video surveillance systems. For these and other more recent deployments, Compass Group is acquiring March Networks 8000 Series Hybrid NVRs, which come in 4-, 8-, 16- and 32-channel configurations and allow for the transition from 100 % analog to 100% IP cameras.

Convenient Browser-Based Client
Also underway is a transition from March Networks Visual Intelligence software to the company's new browser-based Command Enterprise video man­agement system, which can support up to 10,000 video recorders and 128,000 video channels in multisite applications.

“With Command, we don't need software loaded on each computer terminal, so it's a lot more convenient,” said McDonald. “We don't have to get IT involved as much or worry about updating software.”

Compass Group recently transitioned to March Networks Managed Services for tier one telephone support and monitoring of system performance.

The March Networks Managed Services team makes sure that the recorders and cameras are operating properly and dispatch system integrators if onsite maintenance is required.

“I don't have any issues at all with the technical support we have received,” said McDonald. “I've never had a question March Networks technicians couldn't answer or a problem they couldn't solve.

“We're very happy with the reliability of our March Networks technology and excited about how it can continue to contribute to our success, not only as a loss prevention tool, but as a means of ensuring the quality food service our customers have come to expect from us.”

March Networks aims for market growth in Europe

March Networks aims for market growth in Europe

Editor / Provider: March Networks | Updated: 9/3/2014 | Article type: Security 50

March Networks is implementing an ambitious development program to increase its market share and growth in the European video surveillance market, reflecting its expansion and success in North America. The program will be managed by European Sales Director, Stefano Torri, and will target key regions such as the UK, France and Italy.

This growth strategy, will focus on the expansion of local teams within March Networks, working closely with newly recruited and existing channel partners. Together they will target and support core vertical markets including banking, retail and transport, where March Networks already has a reputation for delivering quality market leading IP video management solutions.

The task for Stefano Torri will be to consolidate and grow March Networks' impressive net sales in the first quarter of 2014, which increased by 78% year-on-year compared to 2013. As well as the UK and France, where the objective is to triple revenues, he will be overseeing developments in the Benelux and Scandinavian regions, and will also oversee the introduction of a new Partner Program in Europe.

"Stefano Torri is well placed to spearhead this strategic drive for expansion in Europe,” said Peter Strom, President and CEO of March Networks. “He has proven managerial skills and a deep knowledge of the European market and we strongly believe that he will implement this intense development program, which aims to achieve global market leadership, with great success.”

Stefano Torri joined March Networks in 2013, following his previous role as European Sales Director for VideoIQ Inc, a market leader in the Video Content Analytics sector. He has over twenty years of channel sales management experience in the IT and physical security/video-surveillance markets, including roles at Mobotix AG and Plasmon plc.

UK Security Market(2-2): Hot and crowded

UK Security Market(2-2): Hot and crowded

Editor / Provider: Jill Lai, a&s International | Updated: 8/27/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

The UK security market carries some special features; the most notorious is its large number of legacy analog systems. In addition, bearing the consideration over extra cost of re-cabling and labor, complexity of different projects, and requirement toward high quality, UK customers naturally take extra caution in making purchases and adopting new technologies, such as IP. Over the years, the IP adoption speed has picked up dramatically for a country with high resistance to IP; however, it is still comparatively slower than the US, Middle Eastern, and Scandinavian regions. According to different vendors' comments, the ratio of analog to IP installation in the U.K. is around 50-to-50 or 40-to-60. Steve Carney, Director of Video Product Line Management at Tyco Security Products, dissected the IP growth momentum and said, “The price of IP security products has become more challenging over the past 12 months. It pushes the higher-end IP market to generate more values, such as embracing more intelligent video and mobility in security systems. It also helps stimulate the traditional, cost-driven, analog market (such as the U.K.) to adopt more IP.“

Fully Supports Different Technologies
In a country with widespread legacy systems, companies in the U.K. pay extra attention to developing different technologies, such as encoders/ switchers or hybrid systems to fulfill the requirements for fusing analog and IP systems together. Gerard Otterspeer, Regional Marketing Manager of Video Systems for EMEA at Bosch Security Systems, suggested, “The U.K. has a large base of legacy systems. So, there is always a need to make sure if your systems are able to integrate with legacy systems. We feel that the UK market is going IP quite fast; roughly, 60 percent of our projects here use IP. When providing the IP products here, we also have to ensure they connect with other analog systems too.” In addition, “It is very important to have full product portfolios to support the large legacy market. We do have a wide range of products, such as encoders, and also HD hybrid cameras supporting IP and analog,” he highlighted.

This was also echoed by Axis. Andres Vigren, Product Manager for Axis Communications said, “The U.K. has a history of analog. We are coming from IT. It is very important to have a complete portfolio also including encoders and media converters, to make sure that customers can easily upgrade from analog to IP. Media converters are easy to deploy which you can still keep your coaxial cables.”

Looking to another group of companies, they bring a different statement in appropriate solutions to this market by highlighting the major benefits of using hybrid systems. Carney said, “We have heavily invested in the migration solutions, particularly hybrid solutions that employ a mix of analog and IP technology. I think the encoder market has disappointed some people in some aspects since it costs more for hardware and software for further upgrade. Some people expect encoders could be the transition point, but I would say the transition actually begins with hybrid NVRs and DVRs.” He further explained, “Tyco's American Dynamics and Exacq hybrid NVRs have IP and analog inputs. So, just because in the future the customer fully upgrades to IP, the processing power remains the same whether the device is handling analog or IP video."

March Networks also focused on hybrid NVRs, Stefano Torri, European Sales Director at March Networks said, “Inside the hybrid NVR is a box of encoders, so you can connect it with IP cameras and of course support analog. It is one well set-up alliance, embedded with video management software and added in video analytics. We develop our own video analytics, which we called ‘business intelligence.' We provide a very strong video analytics and value-added software for transaction integration with POS and ATM systems, particularly for big commercial, retail, and banking sector.”

End-to-End Solutions to cater to SIs
Due to the aforementioned considerations of UK customers and extra cost over installation, companies usually have to cater to what systems integrators really need and also bring more added values. Therefore, the total cost of ownership (TCO), return on investment (ROI), and ease of installation are most often evaluated when selecting products and designing systems.

The number of companies who provide end-to-end solutions rise in the market to further ensure systems have seamless compatibility and interoperability. Andrew Myung, Director of Strategy & Planning Team for Global Business Division at IDIS emphasized, “To optimize the values of total video surveillance solutions, education to customers is very important. The obvious example is especially when the retail customers have chain stores around the country; it carries extra time and cost to upgrade their systems within all their branches. Therefore, what we propose is the simplicity of IP systems with the idea of ‘plug-and-play,' which is very similar to the old, analog systems. Since what we provide is a very wide, end-to-end product line, the hefty increase of installation and maintenance time, labor and difficulties can largely be alleviated.” In the U.K., brand awareness and quality are important. What is worth noticing is IDIS, well-known in the OEM business for a long while, spent a very short timeframe preparation to complete its full IP video product lines and market its own brands in the U.K. and other European regions. This year, it has already launched 4K cameras, NVRs, and also monitors.

Full Video & Access Control
Integration to Simplify Work for SIs Solution providers are also working on developing integrated systems. Avigilon, another end-to-end solutions provider, this year, further demonstrated its integrated access control platform, which is able to manage an alarm from access control and video in one single platform. “Our most recent version of access control software includes the introduction of an appliance, which is an ideal solution for up to 32 readers, to address the physical security needs of small to mediumsized sites. It simplifies security with a cost-effective, all-in-one appliance,” said Ian Povey, Director of Product Marketing and Product Management for Avigilon, in a press release.

Carney continued, “Tyco also invested very heavily in integration of our video and access control systems. Both of our video and access control now are able to be integrated into one single platform, which we see as being a requirement for the middle to high-end market. These integrated solutions can better manage the work flow and cost, and provide better service.”

Since the UK market is quite crowded, companies are looking for more added values to differentiate their security systems. Meanwhile, end users no longer want standalone products but integrated solutions from a single company. Andrew Dicken, GM of System Solutions Group of Panasonic System Communications Company Europe said, “The market trend we have seen over the past five years across the EU, not just the UK, is a move toward integrated systems. Panasonic's System Solutions Group has engineering teams working globally on projects that integrate numerous products with proprietary or third party software and total security technologies.”

On the manufacturers' side, forming partnerships over technologies or strategic alliances is a common approach to develop integrated solutions. Panasonic's entrance into the European access control market is a very obvious example. To become a total solution provider, Panasonic Europe expanded its access control product line by forming a strategic alliance with Bravida Fire & Security, a leading access control and intruder alarm company based in Scandinavia. Dicken commented, “Through this strategic alliance, Bravida is able to use Panasonic's video surveillance and fire platform, and Panasonic uses Bravida's access control and intruder platform. Two companies are forming an alliance, a synergy of two major brands in Europe. We are designing products together and also are integration partners. Besides, we are able to share the market intelligence as well as engineering and sales resources.”

Third-party Partnership Calls for Open Platform
To cater to what systems integrators and end users need, some companies work on third-party integration and partnerships. Peter Ainsworth, Head of Product & Marketing at Samsung Techwin Europe said, “What we are highlighting this year is the processing power of our latest DSP chipset that is incorporated into our latest generation of video surveillance cameras is such that we can offer customers complete freedom and flexibility to choose the edge based video analytics App, which best matches their individual requirements. The DSP chipset has the ability to run multiple applications simultaneously and so, in addition to utilizing video analytics for security or business intelligence purposes, customers have the option to run a wide range of other types of Apps such as, for example, cloud storage.”

Another example is PSIM, which benefits most large enterprises, is able to integrate more non-traditional security sensors into the solution to get more operational benefits and save money to increase ROI, according to Jamie Wilson, Marketing Manager of Security of EMEA at NICE Systems. One case is PSIM collocates with VMS in building management systems to control lights, ventilation systems, and lift management. The integration enables the data from other systems to come in PSIM.

Constructing Security ecosystems
Telling from the latest development in the UK security market, it won't work if companies just follow the traditional way to do security business. Even manufacturers need to leverage the strength from other manufacturers to create new business and markets, not to mention other channel players. We can expect in the future for many security ecosystems to be built up. Again, companies working hard in the U.K. provide valuable examples for other markets, too.

Related Article:
UK Security Market(2-1): Hot and crowded

March Networks unveils 6700 Series Hybrid NVR and Edge 4e Encoder

March Networks unveils 6700 Series Hybrid NVR and Edge 4e Encoder

Editor / Provider: March Networks | Updated: 6/18/2014 | Article type: Security 50

March Networks, a global provider of intelligent IP video solutions, is pleased to introduce its new 6700 Series Hybrid Network Video Recorders (NVRs) and the Edge 4e Encoder. The high-performance products support a cost-effective transition to high-definition (HD) IP video and advanced business intelligence applications, while providing outstanding reliability and browser-based video management. In addition, the 6700 Series recording platform incorporates privacy masking and other privacy protection features to meet varying video surveillance guidelines across Europe.

"These latest additions to our portfolio make it easier for customers to deploy advanced IP video solutions sooner and more affordably," said Net Payne, Chief Marketing Officer, March Networks. "They support capabilities that deliver practical business benefits to an organization, and incorporate industry-first features that save customers and channel partners service costs in the field."

6700 Series Hybrid NVR
Initially available in 16 and 8-channel models, the 6700 Series recording platform provides exceptional hybrid flexibility, supporting any combination of analog and IP cameras up to a maximum of 16 IP cameras. Its optimized H.264 video compression ensures detailed, HD video and sharp analog image capture without increasing storage requirements.

Designed with channel partners in mind, each 6700 Series Hybrid NVR comes with a unique QR code on the front panel. Technicians working at a customer site can scan the code using March Networks' free GURU smartphone application to access a wide range of product information and utilities, such as on-the-spot troubleshooting, warranty status and express return material authorisations. The industry-first application is compatible with iOS and Android devices and can significantly reduce the time and effort required to service systems in the field. In addition, the rack-mounted 6716 R Hybrid NVR includes March Networks' innovative docking-station design, which further streamlines maintenance by allowing camera cables to remain in place when servicing is needed.

The 6700 Series recorders are fully managed with the March Networks Command video management system (VMS) and its powerful, browser-based client - one of the only thin software clients able to support complete system configuration and administration in addition to live and archived video access. Other system features available with the 6700 solution include interactive mapping, smart card and USB token authentication, and the ability to set user permissions down to the camera level and hourly timeframe.

Edge 4e Encoder
Also new to the March Networks portfolio is the new Edge 4e Encoder. The four-channel encoder enables organizations to seamlessly convert video from existing analog cameras into digital video running on an IP video network. The high-performance device works in concert with Command VMS installed on March Networks hybrid NVRs or industry-standard servers. It offers full frame rate resolution (25 fps PAL / 30 fps NTSC), H.264 and M-JPEG compression streams for bandwidth efficiency, and can stream all four channels in parallel to an optional internal SDHC card for enhanced redundancy.

As an added cost-efficiency, the Edge 4e Encoder requires just one license for all four video channels - making it a compelling and affordable option for IP video migration in many enterprise environments.

March Networks will demonstrate the next-generation 6700 Series Hybrid NVR solution and Edge 4e Encoder, along with its complete IP video solutions portfolio, in Stand D900, Hall S11 at IFSEC International, June 17-19, in London, UK.

A decade in the making: VCA takes center stage (2)

A decade in the making: VCA takes center stage (2)

Editor / Provider: Eifeh Strom, a&s International | Updated: 5/6/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

As technology has improved and more market education has helped end users understand VCA's limitations. Acceptance has gone up and more and more security companies are seeing its immense value.

Embedded From the Start
While companies like the aforementioned found success with VCA software as a standalone product, other companies view VCA software alone as a nonstarter and thereby established companies with VCA embedded into other products, whether it be hardware or other software. “The initial assumption was that VCA is a viable product all by itself,” said Jesikov, “However, as time as passed by it became clear that VCA can only be a part of a bigger integrated product.”

SightLogix was founded in 2004 on the principle that software alone cannot solve a problem; it needs hardware to accompany it. John Romanowich, CEO and founder of SightLogix, explained that to solve the problem of detecting what is wanted and ignoring what is not wanted, good integration of hardware and software is necessary. As a result, since its founding, SightLogix has been embedding video analytics on the edge in thermal cameras for use in outdoor perimeter applications. By putting the analytics onboard the thermal camera, and applying a high degree of video processing, the camera shifts from simply a surveillance device to a security device, as pointed out by Romanowich.

Other companies, such as Intelligent Security Systems (ISS) were founded on a similar principle of embedding VCA software into hardware, but have since modified their business model, integrating video analytics into VMS instead of hardware. When ISS was established in 1999 they were a DVR manufacturer; however, their DVR had built-in analytics. Over time, ISS noted that more and more customers had a need for management services for their video. Therefore, based on customers' needs and where the market was moving, ISS shifted their focus from DVRs to VMS with added-value analytics, which they now embed into hardware, according to Aluisio Figueiredo, COO of ISS. “At the end of the day, if there is no value added, it's [VMS] a commodity. With value added we can provide a tailor-made solution for every customer.” When established in 2003, Aimetis was an analytics company focused on third party integration, but there were significant business and technology obstacles to overcome at the time. Because the potential of analytics was not yet understood, potential partners were slow to invest, explained Justin Schorn, VP of Product Management at Aimetis. “From a technology standpoint, the hardware performance of existing products was insufficient to simply ‘bolt on' analytics. As a result, Aimetis focused on building a video management platform from scratch with VCA as a key differentiator.”

Outsiders Getting in on the Action
Although video analytics is not new to the security industry, adoption has only been gradual. Video analytics is not yet a standard, but seeing the added value of VCA technology, many security companies have acquired, partnered with, or developed their own analytics to add to their offering. Several notable acquisitions of video analytics companies have been made over the last decade, for example Infinova's 2012 acquisition of March Networks, and most recently Avigilon's acquisition of VideoIQ in January of this year. Additionally, in 2013, Kastle Systems, well known for delivering access control as a service, acquired CheckVideo, a provider of cloud-based intelligent video surveillance and alarm verification solutions. This trend of acquiring video analytics companies is also how many total solution providers got into the VCA game.

In 2007, Honeywell Security got in on the VCA game through the acquisition of ActivEye, a small specialist VCA company. This allowed the company to add complementary solutions to their video offering. Their goal in the acquisition was “to ensure that video content analytics sits at the core of integrated security systems, ensuring the technology provides tangible benefits to the security manager,” said Jeremy Kimber, Commercial Operations Marketing Leader of EMEA at Honeywell Security. Similarly, Tyco Security Products' 2008 acquisition of Intellivid, a retail data analytics company, was a stepping stone into VCA technology for the company, originally part of a retail-centric product offering, according Shahar Ze'evi, Senior Product Manager at Tyco Security Products; however, the company has spent the last few years developing the technology to provide functionality for the broader security market. Ze'evi further noted, “Our view of analytics has never been as a standalone application but rather as an additional tool that enhances our VMS offering.”

Many other security companies have acquired VCA companies as well. DVTel, a total solution provider of video surveillance, acquired intelligent video provider ioimage in 2010. “The addition of VCA technology to our product offering was important and necessary,” said Kim Loy, VP of Global Marketing and Chief Product Officer of DVTel. “Rather than start the development of VCA, the company [DVTel] acquired ioimage, which already had a strong brand that was known and trusted in the industry.”

More specialized companies such a FLIR Systems have also acquired more niche video analytics companies, such as Traficon, a company that specializes in video image processing software and hardware for traffic analysis. FLIR's 2012 acquisition of Traficon paved the way for the company to more aptly penetrate the intelligent transportation systems market.

THE YEAR FOR VCA (?)
Regardless of how or when security companies entered into the video analytics world, the increased interest is surely a good omen for the future of VCA. As more vendors begin to include video analytics in their offering, along with the continued growth of technology, accuracy, and education, there is no reason for 2014 to not be the year of VCA.

A decade in the making: VCA takes center stage (1)

Pelco IP cams integrated with March Networks Command VMS

Pelco IP cams integrated with March Networks Command VMS

Editor / Provider: March Networks | Updated: 4/15/2014 | Article type: Security 50

March Networks and Pelco by Schneider Electric announced the integration of the March Networks Command video management system (VMS) with Sarix Series IP cameras, Spectra HD Dome PTZ and Sarix TI Thermal Imaging camera systems. The integration provides organizations with greater flexibility when selecting an IP video surveillance solution, and ensures faster, more cost-effective system deployment.

“We are excited by this support for our complete range of IP cameras, including our new Sarix Professional and Enhanced Ranges, by the March Networks VMS solution,” said Kristina Holmqvist, Business Development Manager EMEA at Pelco by Schneider Electric. “This integration provides the possibility for our joint customers to use our multipurpose range of cameras with March Networks' high performance solution.”

March Networks Command is a scalable, standards-based VMS designed to work seamlessly with leading security products and systems. This open approach makes it easy for customers to adopt the software solution and choose the IP edge devices that are best for their applications. Command is one of the only VMS solutions able to support complete surveillance system configuration and administration – in addition to live and archived video access – via its browser-based client interface.

Built upon the three pillars of innovative imaging science, sophisticated industrial design, and advanced processing power, Sarix delivers a crisp, clear image. With the Sarix Series, Pelco by Schneider Electric offers a complete line of IP bullet, box and dome cameras for any lighting condition, application and environment. All new Sarix cameras integrate with major third-party video management systems through the Pelco API, and other third-party software and systems through the ONVIF Profile S standard, and they work seamlessly with Pelco video management systems.

The deep Command 1.7 integration with Pelco IP cameras supports a complete list of capabilities including: audio capture; H.264, M-JPEG and MPEG4 video compression; multi-encoding; presets and tours; motion, Adaptive Motion and Directional Motion detection; and robust I/O and PTZ control.

“Working with best-in-class security manufacturers like Pelco to expand the choices available to our Command VMS customers is a priority for our company,” said Net Payne, Chief Marketing Officer, March Networks. “We are pleased to announce this integration and join Pelco's Partner First community.”

March Networks NVR integrated Software House access control solution

March Networks NVR integrated Software House access control solution

Editor / Provider: March Network | Updated: 4/14/2014 | Article type: Security 50

March Networks, a global provider of intelligent IP video solutions, announced the integration of its 8000 Series Hybrid Network Video Recorder (NVR) system with the Software House C-CURE 9000 Security and Event Management System. The integration provides customers worldwide with a centralized video surveillance and access control solution that enables faster incident response, improved risk management and more efficient security operations.

"In collaboration with Software House, we are proud to offer our customers this seamless integration, which supports the convenient, remote monitoring of dozens or thousands of locations and the fast visual verification of incidents when needed," said Dan Cremins, Director of Product Management, March Networks.

The certified integration delivers everything organizations need to manage their video surveillance via the C-CURE 9000 system. Analog and IP video feeds are all incorporated into the access control software, allowing customers to instantly monitor, review and access live and archived video from any 8000 Series Hybrid NVR or previous generation 4000 C or 3000 Series recorder. In addition, the integration enables users to control surveillance camera actions associated with C-CURE 9000 triggered alarms, including multi-view video popups, PTZ movement, and video tagging. They can also monitor alarms appearing in the C-CURE 9000 interface, including those represented within maps, and react swiftly to disconnected recorders or camera video synchronization loss.

"We're pleased to be working with March Networks to bring customers an important tool to keep their people and property safe," said Jason Ouellette, Director of Product Management, Tyco Security Products access control solutions. "Integrating the C-CURE 9000 with the March Networks hybrid NVR system gives customers visibility to critical security events, allowing them to react quickly."

March Networks' comprehensive video management solution provides the unparalleled reliability, centralized management and performance organizations need to maintain the highest security standards and operate more efficiently. Able to support both analog and IP surveillance cameras, or run as a pure IP platform with as many as 32 IP cameras, the 8000 Series Hybrid NVRs enable businesses to make a smooth transition to advanced IP video networking. Combined with enterprise-class management and powerful investigation capabilities, the solution saves customers time and resources and is proven in installations worldwide, including more than 450 financial institutions and some of the world's largest retail organizations.

Software House's C-CURE 9000 security and event management system utilizes IT- standard tools and innovative distributed architecture. It offers advanced integration capabilities, advanced alarm routing and remote access for system administration and monitoring via a light client. Leveraging Microsoft's sophisticated .NET 4 technology, C-CURE 9000 provides native encryption and XML data transfer, making it one of the fastest, most secure systems in the industry.

US wine superstore deploys March video surveillance solution

US wine superstore deploys March video surveillance solution

Editor / Provider: March Networks | Updated: 3/27/2014 | Article type: Security 50

March Networks, a global provider of intelligent IP video solutions, announced that America's largest wine and spirits superstore Total Wine & More has standardized on its next-generationretail video surveillance solution. The privately-owned chain is using the March Networks offering to maintain its strong security and loss prevention efforts across 100 outlets located in 15 states, and to capture clear video evidence to assist with liability protection as it grows its e-commerce business.

Total Wine, which is adding 12-15 new stores annually, transitioned to the March Networks 8000 Series Hybrid NVRs and Visual Intelligence software when it began opening Internet fulfilment centers in its stores. The 25,000-square-foot retail outlets hold nearly 14,000 types of wines, beers and spirits and feature walk-in cigar humidors and keg rooms, wine tasting areas and classrooms. While existing analog cameras are in place to monitor the stores' public areas, Total Wine needed high-definition (HD) IP cameras to capture essential data when packaging bottles that could retail for up to $2,000. The 8000 Series recorders can support a mix of analog and IP cameras or as many as 32 IP cameras, giving Total Wine the freedom to transition to HD video cost-effectively as its business requirements evolve.

“We didn't want to abandon our analog cameras, and the March Networks solution allowed us to add more IP cameras to our build-out where and when we needed them,” said Total Wine Senior Project Manager Mark Ganter. “We're very happy with the solution and the support we have received. We have such vast coverage that we can see almost every part of a store, and we now use the video surveillance system if we need to investigate a problem or inspect an area in any of our stores.”

Total Wine operates mini-fulfillment centers within select stores, where product is pulled from the shelves, packaged and shipped to customers by courier. IP cameras in the fulfillment rooms capture images of the bottles, shipping information and labels for proof of packaging and delivery. Additional IP cameras are positioned to capture the pickup by the courier, at which time all liability transfers to the courier. If the need arises, Total Wine can review its video archives to retrace the steps of the fulfillment process and verify exact details.

The high-performance March Networks 8000 Series Hybrid NVRs provide the retailer with unparalleled reliability and scale, centralized system management and the ability to remotely access live and recorded video. In the future, Total Wine may also take advantage of video analytics and software applicationsavailable in the March Networks retail portfolio for expanded loss prevention, operations and marketing intelligence.

“Our experience working with some of the world's largest retailers has resulted in our next-generation offering, which is ideally suited to help organizations like Total Wine & More protect and grow their business and optimize operations,” said Net Payne, Chief Marketing Officer, March Networks. “Retailers are using video-based intelligence to better protect assets, prevent losses, enhance security and increase profits in the process. The technology is now considered a competitive advantage rather than just a security system.”

C-Store chain keeps losses in check with March Networks

C-Store chain keeps losses in check with March Networks

Editor / Provider: March Networks | Updated: 3/26/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Digital video was still in its infancy when Quik-E Foods of Lynchburg, Virginia, began equipping its convenience stores with March Networks 3108 video recorders 10 years ago.

“I'm a bit of an IT geek, so for a small C-store chain, we've always been very proactive with technology,” said Vice-President Todd Burgess. Times have changed. Today, Burgess can pull up video from any of the company's 12 stores and five car washes on his iPad using March Networks' Cloud service, but several of those original 3108s are still in service.

“We have replaced some of our original recorders with March Networks 4208 and 8516 recorders, but I still have four 3108s,” said Burgess. “They've been up and running 365 days a year all this time. The only reason some of them have had to be replaced is because their power supplies have gone bad, but I guess nothing lasts forever.”

Quik-E Foods experience is consistent with March Networks' reputation for rock solid reliability.

“The thing that most impresses me about March Networks technology is that it's a piece of equipment that I never have to fool with,” remarked Burgess. “I'm the IT guy who has to fix every printer, every keyboard, every point-of-sale system. If it's plugged into a wall, I have to fix it, but I can honestly say that I never have to fool with a March Networks video recorder. I've never even had a hard drive go bad.”

Burgess was especially impressed when all of his March Networks recorders came back to life following a derecho, a wall of storms with 60 mile-per hour winds that tore through Lynchburg and area last summer.

“We all lived on generators for an entire week, but when the power was restored, all of my recorders came back up. I had no issues at all.”

Backward Compatibility
Equally important, the C-store chain's collection of 3108, 4208 and 8516 recorders illustrates March Networks' commitment to backward compatibility. There was never a reason for Quik-E Foods to replace its perfectly functioning 10-year-old recorders to take advantage of software upgrades or other enhancements in video surveillance technology. When Burgess powers up his iPad and goes to the Cloud to review live or archived video from his 12 stores, for example, it makes no difference if it's a 3108 recorder or a brand new 8000 Series NVR. All three generations of March Networks recorders co-exist across the Quik-E Foods footprint.

The effectiveness of Quik-E Foods' video surveillance system is also attributable to March Networks' user-friendly interface.

“Our managers use the Live Viewer, Evidence Manager and Investigator soft?ware on a daily basis,” said Burgess. “They all know how to use them as well as I do and they're all self-taught. I haven't had to do any training, which speaks to how easy it is to use.”

Five or six years ago, March Networks worked with Quik-E Foods to integrate its video surveillance and point-of-sale systems, allowing Burgess and the company's store managers to review recorded video with text overlay.

“It's invaluable to be able to pull up a camera and see what's being rung up overlaid on top of the video,” said Burgess. “It's the greatest feature ever because a lot of theft occurs when a friend comes in with a two-liter drink, and a pack of cigarettes, and the employee just rings up the two-liter drink.”

Searchlight for Retail
Quik-E Foods is now in the process of upgrading to March Networks' Searchlight application, which offers several advantages over the current POS integration.

“Before, with text overlay, I could only search for voided or canceled transactions by logging in at each recorder locally,” explained Burgess. “With Searchlight, all the transaction data is stored at corporate on a server, so I can go in and ask to see all voided transactions at all locations in a specified time range.”

Better still, Searchlight will automatically deliver a daily emailed report identifying suspect transactions with links to the corresponding video.

The integration of video and transaction data is critical for combating POS fraud in a C-store environment.

“Just recently,” said Burgess, “we caught a cashier who was ringing up sales, putting them on hold, collecting the money and then canceling the transactions when the customer left the store. So far, our losses from this one employee add up to $6,000. These transactions show up as voids in my system, so with an emailed report from Searchlight, I'll get a list of all the voids by store and click on a link to watch the video. There won't be a need to search for hours and hours. It's instant.”

Quik-E Foods is slowly transitioning to IP cameras for higher-resolution video of activity at its laser car washes as well as its gas pumps and parking areas.

An IP camera would have come in handy last year when a truck pulling a trailer with an asphalt paving machine decided to run through one of the company's car washes, knocking a $50,000 piece of equipment off its track.

Burgess posted the video on the Quik-E Foods Facebook page and the local media picked it up. Luckily, the contractor responsible for the incident saw it on the news and called Quik-E Foods offering to pay for the damage.

“If I had had an IP camera at that location, I would have known right away who it was because I would have been able to read the logo on the side of the truck or pick up the license plate,” said Burgess.

Each Quik-E Foods store is equipped with a microphone at the check-out counter and a centrally located speaker. Audio is recorded along with the video, and if absolutely necessary, Burgess or anyone else at head office can push a button and communicate with store staff.

Searches Made Easy
The audio came in handy one day when a gang of cigarette thieves used sledge hammers in the middle of the night “to beat the brick out of the back” of one of company's stores and made off with $18,000 worth of cigarettes. There was no camera outside the back of the store to record them, but when Burgess checked the video the next day he found an image of a suspicious looking character peering through the window at the front of the store.

“It was 3 a.m. and you could hear the beating on the back of the building, so we just put two and two together,” said Burgess. “We also went through archived video thinking they may have cased out the store in advance and, sure enough, there was the same guy. We also had an image of the car in the parking lot.”

While the system is primarily used for loss prevention, Todd's father and Quik-E Foods founder Wilton Burgess also takes advantage of its live viewing capability to make sure the stores are neat and tidy. Physically inspecting all 12 stores and five car washes would take him two or three days. With the March Networks system, he can sit in front of his computer and accomplish the same thing in 20 minutes or less.

Over the years, Quik-E Foods' video surveillance system has paid for itself many times over. It's also a valuable source of evidence for Lynchburg Police Department officers investigating credit card theft, car accidents and other incidents in the community.

“The local police have the March Networks player on their PCs, so it's a piece of cake for them, and I'm in court a lot, even for matters that are unrelated to us,” said Burgess.

Looking to the future, Burgess is resigned to the fact that his remaining 3108 recorders will eventually need to be replaced, but looks forward to standardizing on the more powerful 8000 Series hybrid recorder with additional IP cameras, web-based Command software and the investigative smarts of Searchlight for Retail's fraud fighting tools.

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