You are at : Search > Articles Search Results

Articles Search Results

2557 Articles and 2439 related Products found for IP

Siqura helps Austrian highways upgrade video surveillance system

Siqura helps Austrian highways upgrade video surveillance system

Editor / Provider: Siqura | Updated: 1/28/2015 | Article type: Infrastructure

Asfinag is a publicly owned Austrian company responsible for a network of highways spanning more than 2,000 kilometers. In recent years, the company felt it was reaching the limits of what it could do with its existing video surveillance system. There was no uniformity in the way the storage system was organized, and crucial parts of the system's architecture no longer complied with modern security standards. Asfinag knew exactly what it wanted: a smart, user-friendly system that would embrace open standards while offering support for legacy protocols.

The solution
In collaboration with systems integrator Siemens, Siqura designed an end-to-end surveillance system based on ONVIF-compliant hardware. Part of Asfinag's 5,500 surveillance cameras were replaced, and new and existing analogue cameras were connected to a mix of Siqura's S-series video encoders. The S-series offers standardized H.264 video streaming and flexibility of wiring (Cat 5, optical fiber or coax). To make the most of AKUT, Asfinag's acoustic tunnel monitoring system, Siqura adapted its S-60 E video encoder. The tunnel sound picked up by AKUT can now be digitized and transferred to the control room for further analysis.

For Asfinag's most strategic locations, Siqura developed a new IP camera: the BC840-AID, a full-HD box camera capable of streaming two independent H.264/MJPEG video streams simultaneously. The BC840-AID continuously analyses the images it captures for unusual occurrences, such as stopped vehicles, pedestrians, lost cargo or smoke. As soon as an incident is detected, it automatically sends out an alert to one of Asfinag's control rooms.

By modifying existing components and complementing them with new technology, Siqura succeeded in delivering an economic solution that prepares Asfinag for future developments.

Mongolian bank fully covers 530 branches with QNAP security surveillance solution

Mongolian bank fully covers 530 branches with QNAP security surveillance solution

Editor / Provider: Sponsored by QNAP | Updated: 1/27/2015 | Article type: Commercial Markets

With over 530 branches throughout the country, Khan Bank is one of the largest commercial banks in Mongolia and provides banking services to an estimated 70% of Mongolian households. The Khan Bank was established in 1991 as the Agricultural Cooperative Bank in connection with the dissolution of the State Bank of Mongolia's monopoly. The Bank assumed most of the assets and businesses of the State Bank in rural Mongolia.

Each of Khan Bank's 530 branches handles large amount of transactions and customer enquiries every day. Khan Bank requires a reliable surveillance solution to safeguard their customers and staff in their branches and ATM areas. However, the existing CCTV system was insufficient for meeting their heavy surveillance recording requirements, and Khan Bank planned to improve the safety of their ATM centers by deploying network cameras to deter robberies and other criminal incidents. In the meantime, for bigger branches, Khan Bank planned to upgrade their storage appliances to networked storage devices.

Khan Bank decided to replace their analog CCTV systems with a digital surveillance solution and install 156 units of the QNAP VioStor VS-2104 Pro+ NVR, 98 units of the VS-2108L NVRs, and 20 units of the TS-469 Pro Turbo NAS in their branches and ATM areas. Khan Bank upgraded their surveillance infrastructure to an all-IP solution featuring network cameras.

“With QNAP VioStor NVR solutions, we can easily fulfill customer requirements through the compatibility between NVRs and selected network cameras” said the local system integrator. “The main purpose of this IP surveillance system is to access high-quality video feeds from megapixel network cameras deployed in banks and ATM areas.”

The three-stages of IP surveillance deployment starts from Khan Bank's central office to all branch banks in the capital city and then to the branches in rural areas. Based on branch scale, Khan Bank implements one VioStor NVR with four to eight network cameras to build up an IP surveillance system. With the Turbo NAS storage expansion solution, the VioStor NVR storage can be extended to meet the mandated data archiving period.

The VS-2104 Pro+ and the VS-2108L NVRs run stably, reliably and with enhanced compatibility & performance with Khan Bank's chosen cameras. After easily deploying and configuring the standalone VioStor NVRs, Khan Bank saved a great deal on system maintenance and technical consultation fees and whenever they have questions or need technical support, QNAP Security's responsive and knowledgeable customer service team is always available to assist them. Additional savings were incurred with the VioStor NVR's smart recording mode that records standard-resolution videos during normal events and high-resolution videos only when notable events occur or alarms are triggered - effectively reducing costs as additional hard drives are unnecessary. In addition to the above benefits, Khan Bank has made plans for the next stage of their surveillance system, where they will install the VioStor CMS turnkey solution and will be able to manage NVRs, cameras and events easily and efficiently.

Sponsored by:  

Protected against harsh environments

Protected against harsh environments

Editor / Provider: William Pao, a&s International | Updated: 1/27/2015 | Article type: Tech Corner

When it's pouring outside, or the temperature hits -10 degrees, you want to make sure your surveillance equipment is still working properly. Nowadays, equipment for critical environments — those that are subject to water, dust, winds, sand, salt, or extreme climatic patterns — is built with durability in mind and can effectively withstand harsh conditions. This way, users can rest assured that their products will work normally no matter how tough the surroundings get.

Surveillance equipment isn't just for homes or offices. Sometimes, it is founded in some of the harshest and most unrelenting places in order to keep premises safe and secure. Whether it's set up on a maritime oil drilling platform or somewhere in the Middle East where summer temperatures may easily hit 50 degrees Celsius, equipment must be hardened and ruggedized to be able to perform smoothly and provide maximal safety for users.

International Standards
To help users understand whether certain products are suitable for certain conditions, several international standards have been formulated to indicate how effectively they can work in environments prone to water, dust, explosions, and impact. Some of these standards are listed below.

IP
IP or ingress protection ratings specify how capable equipment can withstand the ingress, or entry, of foreign solids or water. An IP denotation is usually consisted of two numerals, with the first indicating the protection of equipment against solid foreign bodies and the second indicating protection against water. For critical environment equipment, it should be rated IP66 to IP68 as opposed to IP32 to IP54 for indoor settings. A similar rating system, published by National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA), specifies protection of electronic equipment against external ice, corrosive materials, and oil immersion in addition to dust and water.

Hazardous Areas
Hazardous locations are specified under different rating systems around the world. For critical environment equipment, it should be able to work well in areas designated as Class 1 Division 2 Group A or B in North America, or as Gas Group IIC in Europe. Both indicate places where easily flammable gases and vapors, such as hydrogen and acetylene, are present.

IK
The IK rating system is used to denote protection of equipment against impact produced by either a natural disaster or vandalism. It ranges from IK00, or no protection, to IK10, or protection against 20-joule impact, equivalent to the impact of a 5-kilogram mass dropped from 400 millimeters above impacted surface.

Others
Winds are categorized by their speed on the so-called Beaufort Scale. Equipment in critical environments should resist winds of up 61.2 meters per second, or No. 17 on the scale.

This is in contrast to typical equipment that only needs to work well in 41.4 meters-per-second winds, or No. 13 on the scale. Meanwhile, given temperatures often get extremely high or low in critical environments, equipment must be able to withstand these conditions. While typical equipment should have a working temperature range from -10 to 60 degrees Celsius, critical environment products should be able to work in a range between -40 and 70 degrees Celsius. For special equipment in factories monitoring boilers or furnaces, it must be able to withstand high temperatures from 300 to 1,000 degrees Celsius.

Hardened and Ruggedized
When security equipment is installed in critical areas for whatever purpose it's designed for — video surveillance, access control, or intrusion detection — it must be toughened to weather adverse conditions. Special technologies or materials, for example epoxy resin, polyamide, and aluminum alloys, are used to make the products work well in regions or vertical markets that call for hardened, ruggedized equipment.

Video Surveillance
Cameras are needed not just in commercial or residential settings but also in places that are subject to danger or extreme weather conditions. “There's high customer demand for rugged, environmental performance,” said Craig Dahlman, Director of IP Camera Products at Pelco by Schneider Electric.

“Rugged, fortified systems are needed to protect delicate and valuable camera and optics packages.” To meet that demand, Pelco by Schneider Electric has manufactured a series of products that are able to withstand explosions, water and dust ingression, fog, high and low temperatures, winds of up to 57 meters per second, and corrosion by salt and different types of chemicals.

Various cutting-edge technologies have been adopted to make those features possible. For example, certain products feature the pressurized integrated optics cartridge (IOC) technology, which protects the equipment from moisture and airborne contaminants and packages an auto-focus camera, lens, heater, and sensors in a small, self-contained, and sealed unit. Dry nitrogen pressurized to 10 pounds per square inch gauge (PSIG) protects the environment inside the cartridge, whereby sensors strategically placed in the cartridge send an alert message if changes in pressure, temperature, or humidity are beyond factory-set acceptable limits.

Certain models also feature heater, window defroster, sun shroud, and thermal insulation blanket to enable operation in temperature conditions ranging from as low as -46 degrees Celsius to over 49. In the event of a power failure during an ice storm, the entire unit can deice itself and become operational in just two hours after regaining power at a temperature as low as -25 degrees Celsius.

“Video security and surveillance is a mission-critical application … and there is a global demand for these products, particularly in hot dry areas, cold wet areas, marine environments, and humid environments,” Dahlman said.

Illumination products supplement video cameras by providing the necessary lighting and are sometimes placed in critical environments as well. “Housed in marine grade aluminum with a toughened glass window … our critical environment products have a wide operating temperature range from -52 degrees Celsius to 55. Our thermal management system achieves up to 60 percent better heat dissipation than other LED luminaires with a significantly cooler operating temperature,” said Barry Thompson, Head of Hazardous Area Division at Raytec.

These features make Raytec lighting products ideal for a variety of verticals and regions. “We are currently delivering illumination in a vast number of challenging and remote applications across the globe, such as oil fields in Kuwait and Dubai, oil pipelines in North Africa, and offshore platforms in UK and various Middle East regions,” Thompson said.

Access Control
No stringent requirements are demanded of access control readers for commercial or residential applications. But when placed on the outside or in a critical environment, that's a different story.

“The reader has to withstand torrential rain in an outdoor installation,” said Tom Su, Sales Manager at Hundure Technology, which is set to release an IP66 reader. “Plus, it has to be durable enough to be able to work properly in the long term in a harsh environment and withstand human-made damage.”

Materials play an important part in toughening the products. Hundure, for example, uses as a main ingredient epoxy resin, which is an excellent electrical insulator and protects electrical components from short circuiting, dust, and moisture. “We have epoxy inside the reader to make it totally waterproof for outdoor installations,” Su said. Potting, or the filling of a complete electronic assembly with a solid or gelatinous compound for resistance to shock, vibration, moisture, and corrosive agents, is also used during the manufacturing process. “We use potting material for the majority of our readers, which seal them from any kind of water penetration,” said Steven Katanas, Director of Sales for Australia and New Zealand at HID Global. “Potting completely encases all electronics and stands up well to many harsh outdoor environments. An outer case might get beat up a bit, but the inner electronics are durable.”

The other critical element in an access control system, namely the cards, should not be overlooked, either. “Some cards use more durable materials than others. For instance, a line of our smart cards use an ABS shell construction for durability in harsh environments, and can be used in diverse applications including physical access control, PC logon, biometric authentication, time and attendance, cashless vending, public transportation, airline ticketing, and customer loyalty programs,” Katanas said.

Perimeter Intrusion Detection
Perimeter intrusion detection systems (PIDSs) are almost always placed on the outside of important premises such as airports, power plants, and certain government facilities. Sometimes equipment is deployed at places with highly intensive electromagnetic waves, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) may occur. PIDSs with EMI-resistant capabilities are therefore a plus. “One of our perimeter security taut-wire products was installed around a Radio Free Europe site, which transmits one megawatt power of short wave radio using curtain array antenna. These are extreme RF condition,” said Hagai Katz, Senior VP Marketing and DB at Magal Security Systems. “The most demanding conditions were for sections of the fence, which happen to reside right below the antennas' feeders, absorbing very high radio frequency radiation. In spite of all, the system has managed to perform perfectly.”

Heavy winds are also a threat to equipment or products placed on the outside, and manufacturers have different ways to overcome that. For example, Navtech Radar, which makes radar-based PIDSs, puts all the moving parts inside wind-resistant enclosures. “Normally if you have a rotating part exposed to the wind, then the wind pushes on that rotating part, moving it in a way you don't want it to move,” said Philip Avery, MD of Navtech Radar. “All our rotating parts are inside an enclosure. There is a plastic radome that protects the rotating parts from the wind and other elements.”

Any fixings — connectors, screws, and others — that hold the radar together should also be protected. Navtech Radar, for example, is considering putting plastic coating on the connectors to protect them from corrosion, which may occur at heavily corrosive environments like road tunnels.

“Different parts of the radar are bolted together using screws, and the last thing you want is to have those screws heavily corroded so the radar will fall apart,” Avery said. “You need to make sure that not only the main body of your system is made of the right material, but the fixings that hold it together are also made of the right material.”

Door Phones/Intercom/PA
Placed at the entries of residences, door phones should be able to adapt to various local climatic conditions. “Our products are used in high-temperature regions such as the Middle East and Africa, and also used in low-temperature areas like Russia or Scandinavian countries,” said Yoshi Nishiyama, who works for the international sales department of Aiphone. “Regarding the materials, we use environmental friendly materials complying with WEEE & RoHS. And the plastic materials we use are self-extinguishing materials against fire. All the metal materials for door phone units are designed against vandalism, and they have protection against water, sunlight, acids, and so on.”

For intercom and PA manufacturer Zenitel, it chooses polyamide as the material for making its industrial-grade PA call panels and intercom stations.

“Initially, our PA system was designed for the oil and gas industry and marine vessels. Polyamide is resistant to corrosion, so it's suitable for marine environments. Also that material is quite strong so it can withstand impact,” said Piet De Vriendt, Commercial Product Manager for Vingtor-Stentofon at Zenitel. “Fewer and fewer companies are making intercom stations out of metal for industrial applications, as new technologies have improved for polyamide, which is also better for corrosion and chemical resistance.”

Thing to Look for During Installation
For critical environment installations, a rule of thumb is to get products that are rated for conditions worse than where the equipment is being installed. “At the very least, users should make sure they are not installing equipment that is rated for a temperature- and humidity-controlled environment into an area where there will be considerable heat and moisture fluctuation,” HID's Katanas said.

Integrators should also help clients build an infrastructure that presumes and prepares for changes in the future, including ensuring durable performance in harsh environments. “This requires a platform that is dynamic, open, and adaptable, and that ensures security is independent of hardware and media so that organizations can evolve their infrastructure to meet tomorrow's needs,” he said.

With security products becoming increasingly network-centric, how to protect the network infrastructure in critical areas is also important. Some countries or regions even have rules about how IP-based equipment should be installed.

“The Middle East has requirements for transmission equipment that can tolerate very high temperatures. In India we have the same requirements, and in both markets high winds, dust, and sand are an issue, which the transmission equipment must also be able to withstand,” said Sara Bullock, Business Development Director at AMG Systems, adding her company has devoted much R&D efforts on heat reduction.“Our products carry many interfaces within the same box, which dramatically reduces the equipment required at the remote position, which in turn reduces heat within the cabinets,” she said. “A critical factor is airflow. Our products have ventilation slots on the casing, and as long as they are mounted in the correct way, they allow airflow to be forced up through the units.”

Zenitel's De Vriendt stressed the importance of collaborating with someone who is strong at IP setup in harsh conditions. “The most important advice we can give to integrators and installers is to have good cooperation with the consultants who specify the system and to work with companies that have experience with setting up IP networks in these environments,” he said.

Built With Durability
Today's surveillance equipment is built with durability in mind, able to resist various harsh environments to satisfy users' needs. With an understanding in these products, and knowledge on how they should be set up properly, users can have full assurance that their surveillance systems will run smoothly in the midst of inclement conditions.

Japanese convenience store enhanced security with QNAP VioStor NVRs

Japanese convenience store enhanced security with QNAP VioStor NVRs

Editor / Provider: QNAP | Updated: 1/27/2015 | Article type: Commercial Markets

A famous chain of convenience stores in Japan installed QNAP VioStor VS-2108 Pro+ NVR surveillance systems to create a safer shopping experience for customers and a safer working environment for employees.

Challenge
Convenience stores are the backbone of daily life in Japan, where much of the workforce commutes to work by train, often for more than 1 hour each way. The branch manager of the convenience store chain well understands his customer's needs and that creating a pleasant and safe shopping experience is critical to keeping the customers loyal to his store chain.

After several robberies and a string of theft incidences at some of the stores, a branch manager for the store chain set out to begin discussions with security consultants to work out a solution that prevents unexpected guests and would aid in loss prevention throughout the chain of stores and allow for both local and remote centralized monitoring. The primary challenge is this chain store group currently runs around 1,000 convenience stores and with such large enterprise it was difficult to design a security system that could be deployed chain-wide and allow local recording and storage of the surveillance as well as remote monitoring of video from many stores by a remote office. The secondary challenge for deployment of a security system is that it needed to be PC-less and fit into the limited space in the stores.

Solution
The previous CCTV systems installed in the stores delivered poor image quality and there was no provision for remote monitoring. Most of the CCTV systems recorded on tape, which was not always reliable. After a great deal of research, the branch manager of the store chain selected QNAP VioStor VS-2108 Pro+ NVRs for deployment at around 600 stores. The VS-2108 Pro+ is a compact NVR that can record video surveillance up to 8 IP cameras installed in the stores on two 6TB internal hard disk drives with enough space for up to 30 days of recorded surveillance video. The NVR is a networked video surveillance system, allowing the video feeds from the cameras to be transmitted securely over the Internet to a remote monitoring location. Additionally, a monitor can be connected to the VS-2108 Pro+ via HDMI for full HD local display and live monitoring in the store managers office.

The essential places to monitor in a convenience store are typically the cash register area, store entrances, stockroom, and merchandise areas. These areas are protected by 2-3 IP cameras, delivering HD quality video for important details over the Internet but not taking up much storage space on the VS-2108 Pro+ NVR's internal hard disks. In addition to video, the usage of audio interaction allows the cashiers to receive instructions, enabling them to react timely. Other cameras fixed on the store shelves and store entrance give the store manager an indication of where customers might need assistance from staff.

Surveillance videos can also be viewed on mobile devices; which enables store managers to analyze the staff's working efficiency and have a better picture of where resources should be allocated. The remote security staff based at the chain's headquarters office can easily access any of the recorded video surveillance from any of the VS-2108 Pro+ systems at any time to support investigations and share with authorities. The NVR offers advanced features that allow the security team to get an SMS or email alert automatically if movement is detected in certain areas before or after specific times.

Banks cash in on integrated, scalable systems

Banks cash in on integrated, scalable systems

Editor / Provider: Israel Gogol, Freelancer, a&s International | Updated: 1/27/2015 | Article type: Commercial Markets

In recent years the most talked-about security threats to banks have been cybercrimes and fraud. Though it seems that traditional security systems are no longer in the spotlight; banks still make substantial investment in their physical security systems. Changes in the design and layout of banks as well as banks' desire to make the most out of their installed systems have great impact on the design and implementation of current security systems.

Banks hold the great responsibility of keeping our money safe. Even though most of this money is now in the form of electronic bits and bytes, banks are still one of the first associations when we think of security and surveillance systems.

Banks usually balance the mix of their security systems between discrete and unobtrusive systems such as emergency buttons and small hidden cameras (e.g., at the counter area or an ATM pinhole camera) and more visible measures such as guards and larger cameras. The visible security systems serve a double purpose, both deterring potential violators as well as giving customers a feeling the bank is indeed a safe place to keep their money. Surveillance systems installed in banks will usually combine several cameras with different functionality. Outside the bank infrared cameras will provide day and night monitoring. Inside the branch, dome and bullet cameras are used for lobby and counter monitoring for clear picture capturing and forensic evidence. The main purpose of these cameras is to prevent illegal intrusion by unauthorized people as well as monitoring the office environment to prevent property loss.

CHALLENGES OF THE BANKING VERTICAL
A major obstacle facing security companies and systems integrators is aligning the security needs of individual branch locations with the requirements outlined by the corporate headquarters. “Securing the bank branches themselves is different from securing a corporate headquarters or data center location, as branches are more often the targets for criminals since it's assumed that's where the money is located,” explained Matt Frowert, Director of Marketing for Financial Services at Tyco Integrated Security. Therefore, the standard level of security and defense are more in-depth at a branch than for a corporate office. Many times legacy systems, or different versions of the same platform, may be found in different regional branches of the same institution within a country, which makes centralized management difficult. In addition, there may be internal resistance to changes or upgrades that the corporate standards demand due to funding constraints, or the local staff being inexperienced and lacking training regarding proper security measures and systems. Another challenge may simply be a matter of timing and scheduling; implementing major technology upgrades across very large financial institutions with many branches and offices.

NEW BANK LAYOUTS
In recent years banks have been changing their traditional set-up to be more appealing to customers. There are more “light” branches located inside shopping malls and supermarkets. Traditional branch layout and design have also changed and now include more open floor plans and fewer staff which are tasked with broader responsibilities. “More in-branch automation and systems found in these new types of banks very likely means that they may not have the same levels of cash that traditional branches have,” added Frowert. “During a robbery attempt, the suspect may be confused when he discovers there is limited teller cash and no safe like there would be in a traditional bank set-up. These new frameworks for bank branches will affect the security of the customers themselves and the bank's security model for protection,” he explained.

As a result, emphasis is placed on new systems that offer increased ATM protection through anti-skimming technology, access control, and proper lighting measures for ATM vestibules to help ensure customers are properly protected.

BENEFITS OF INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR BANKS
Like any other enterprise, banks require their systems provide security, safety, efficiency, and cost saving. “Normally, powerful VMS software can integrate four systems, such as video monitors, access control, alarm systems, and the intercom system, which are used to communicate with bank clients at other locations, for example using an ATM at a different site,” said Nathan Chen, Solution and Product Manager at Dahua Technology. In turn, each system includes several components: alarm systems for example will include fire alarms, seismic sensors to detect if someone is digging into the bank, and emergency buttons. Access control systems will combine card readers, biometrics, magnetic door sensors, etc. This provides banks with an integrated solution instead of four stand-alone systems. In addition, sensors such as smoke detectors or temperature sensors are now built in the cameras and can send alarms directly to the DVR system. This way the bank can benefit from having several sensors on one platform and cut costs.

Systems integration is also critical for protection against insider threats by employees which can be very costly. “An increasingly popular step in mitigating insider threats through an integrated security system includes linking access control to identity management,” explained Frowert. By integrating these systems, financial institutions can restrict employee access to sensitive areas, track entry/exit times by employee or department, and use a log correlation engine or security information and event management (SIEM) system to log, monitor, and audit employee actions. By monitoring these types of systems, managers may notice individual employees trying to access part of the building they are not authorized for, which is activity they can then flag and subsequently continue to monitor the employee's behavior for other activity that might lead to an insider incident.

HYBRID DVRs AND NVRs
Hybrid DVRs and NVRs allow the integration of both existing analog cameras and newer IP cameras. The use of hybrid DVRs and NVRs can therefore help banks make the most out of their existing legacy systems and give them the flexibility they need in adding more cameras or testing new cameras and technologies.

“Our customers are interested in how they can protect their investments in legacy infrastructure while also taking advantage of the benefits of newer technology. There is an increasing move towards new NVRs because they can prolong the use of video surveillance systems as well as provide enhanced features to end users,” iterated Stefano Torri, European Sales Director of March Networks (an Infinova Company). These provide both analog and IP camera support and allow organizations to test and deploy IP cameras selectively, alongside existing analog cameras. “Banks are thinking about the broader benefits of the technology they use, so for example, NVR technology provides advances in video compression and storage management compared to earlier DVRs, and the use of H.264 compression, optimized to limit video signal noise, makes images clearer while reducing the use of bandwidth and storage. These things are important if a bank wants to tag video based on user-defined criteria, such as motion detection, transaction events, or alarms. Software that delivers intelligence and analytics is also a growing trend amongst banks and financial institutions,” he added.

ANALYTICS
An example of an analytics function used in banks is loitering detection, detecting for instance when a person lingers around an ATM machine. If such an event is detected, security personnel can then access the video recording in real-time and make a decision if further action is needed. Analytics can also provide information on customer behaviors (e.g., people counting, queue monitoring) which can be shared across the organization to improve not only security surveillance but also customer service and marketing. For example banks can analyze dwell and wait time at branches and change branch staffing appropriately to make sure there are enough tellers to service the waiting clients.

Apart from connecting the different systems in the branches, banks can also share information between locations. This feature has been gaining traction and makes security more comprehensive. Intelligent video applications allow an internal investigator to track fraudulent transactions and alert branches. “For example, entering a stolen card number into the system will deliver brief video clips of every associated transaction from anywhere across the entire retail banking network,” explained Torri. Not only can security managers easily export this information to branch managers, but they can also present it as integrated case evidence to the police.

KEYLESS ENTRY
Apart from using video analytics, banks are using intrusion detection and keyless entry to improve security measures and increase cost effectiveness. Replacing or re-keying traditional locks can cost a bank up to US$3 million in just one year. To mitigate the risks and costs associated with using traditional keys, banks are implementing new, wireless locks which work with inexpensive access cards to open entry doors. These new technologies also provide audit friendly reporting for the activities of any individual or of a specific entry point in the branch.

OPPORTUNITIES IN BANKING
Banks are relatively conservative players in the security market usually waiting to implement tried and tested solutions. Due to their large scale and many sites, frequent changes of security systems are not likely. Therefore solutions that help banks take advantage of their existing systems, integrate several functionalities together, and introduce newer technologies will be the choice for the banking vertical.

5 Tips for a Successful Security Installation in Banking
Matt Frowert, Director of Marketing for Financial Services at Tyco Integrated Security, provided the following five tips for banks when deploying a security surveillance system.

  1. Find an experienced integrator who specializes in bank physical security. 
  2.  Look for a partner who can support everything from single bank branches all the way up to money center banking models (banks who deal with governments, large corporations, and other banks).
  3. Network with security affinity groups of industry organizations, like the American Bankers Association, to receive recommendations on vendors from other banks in your area.
  4. Standardize on leading access, video, and intrusion systems supported by vendors that have a track record of investing in technology. 
  5. Invest in communication with and training of banking staff to enable them to effectively use the systems (e.g., arming the alarms at the branch level, managing the distribution of codes at the branch level, etc.).

A major retail chain improves video surveillance coverage with LILIN

A major retail chain improves video surveillance coverage with LILIN

Editor / Provider: Sponsored by LILIN | Updated: 1/26/2015 | Article type: Hot Topics

Stationery retailer giant in Asia
A major retailer required better surveillance video in many of its locations throughout Taiwan Island. The company is headquartered outside of Kyoto, Japan and is one of the biggest stationery chains in Asia Pacific region founded in late 1980. The retailer is expanding business abroad quickly and so far the retailer has more than 18 chain store locations in Taiwan alone.

Upgraded with LILIN CCTV speed dome cameras to prevent shoplifting
Theft has always been a well-known problem for high-street retailers. Because of the need to look out for the safety of both customers and personnel, the large area of the stationery stores, and the surveillance system in place across their 18 stores Taiwan nationwide did not meet their current security demands, the retailer has decided to upgrade their outdated CCTV system to provide employees and customers with the highest level of security. In addition, the company wanted to control its processes such as checkout flow more effectively by the deployment of surveillance cameras. With the use of CCTV technology, the company is able to prevent shoplifting and theft, and therefore to safeguard its stock and profit margins.

Choose speed domes from LILIN to monitor
LILIN's SI system integrator partner in Taiwan, EverPark, recommended LILIN speed dome surveillance solution suitable for this highly specialized retail application. The retailer giant adopted LILIN video solution ensuring real-time surveillance of the widespread stores throughout Taiwan.

Solutions integrated with stores' POS system
There are 18 stores to be monitored and each store is installed with 5 LILIN SP312 speed dome cameras for in-store security solutions. LILIN surveillance systems are able to integrate smoothly with the existing analogue infrastructure, and also LILIN video solution at each store has been integrated with the POS system to trace sales transactions.

LILIN provides powerful video surveillance solutions which perfect for store chains.

 

Sponsored by: 
LILIN is a global IP video manufacturer with over 30 years of experience. Throughout the years, the company has maintained its dedication to Creativity, Progress, and Excellence providing expertise in digital video with a strong focus on innovation moving forward.

Sony SNC-VB632D camera with dual light system

Sony SNC-VB632D camera with dual light system

Editor / Provider: Sponsored by Sony | Updated: 1/26/2015 | Article type: Hot Topics

The SNC-VB632D is a Dual Light outdoor bullet-type camera. It is the first IP camera from Sony to feature a Dual Light system.

Effective deterrence, day or night
SNC-VB632D - a bullet-type security camera that's ideal for protecting city centres and transport systems, building entrances and perimeters, car parks, retail centres and colleges.

Its unique Dual Light system uses Infrared light to deliver crisp black & white pictures in total darkness, and a white LED illuminator, triggered by movement, to capture Full HD colour images while providing an effective visual deterrence to intruders.

A clear view when darkness falls
When darkness falls, the camera's on-board infrared (IR) illuminator switches on automatically, to capture clear black and white images with an effective range of 30 metres.

Then if there's movement within its field of view, the SNC-VB632D has another surprising trick to unsettle intruders. A moving object automatically triggers the camera's integrated white LED illuminator. Lighting the immediate scene over a range of 5m, the illuminator can be spotted clearly from far away. The illuminator's sudden switch-on also provides a powerful visual warning to unexpected visitors.

At the same time, the camera switches automatically to colour video mode, capturing detail-packed Full HD images at up to a smooth 60fps frame-rate in colour to assure positive identification of the subject.

Better looking pictures, simpler installation
The innovative Dual Light system is combined with Sony's wide dynamic View-DR technology, ensuring that near and far-away objects are all evenly exposed. As an extra refinement, the camera's built-in image stabiliser minimises the effects of vibration: for example when the camera's subject to wind or traffic vibration.

With everything integrated into a single unit – image-stabilised camera, IR illuminator and white LED lighting – installation is simplified to reduce hardware and labour costs.

HD-over-coaxial: what you need for a carefree upgrade experience

HD-over-coaxial: what you need for a carefree upgrade experience

Editor / Provider: Michelle Chu | Updated: 1/23/2015 | Article type: Hot Topics

'Better image quality, easy-to-installation, long distance transmission are three major concerns when it comes to deploying CCTV upgrade solution,' said Anna Hsiung, Marketing Manager at GKB.

 >>> Click the imgae for the full content

Since IP system emerged a few years ago, analog players have been trying to supply solutions with higher image quality and more efficient installation. Despite the market share of IP solutions are increasing steadily, analog systems still domain with around 70 to 80 percent.

Being able to deliver superb image quality at longer distance, HD-over-coaxial solutions, be it AHD, ccHDtv, HDCVI, and HDTVI, promise the end users a carefree surveillance systems upgrade without hassle on ripping out existing cables.

HD-over-coaxial systems also guarantee no frame losing, as bandwidth is not an issue at all for image transmission. “ccHDtv, transmitting through DVB-t, is able to provide image resolution of 1080P perpetually, and the end users will not suffer from poor image quality as the cables aging over time,” said Bryan Wang, Business Development Manager of a-tec.

As many retrofit projects face with restrain budget, better quality with lower budget is another major advantage of HD-over-coaxial solutions. “GKB AHD 5480 dome camera is ideal to adopt for retrofit project in chain store, residential area, bank, and education sectors,” said Anna Hsiung, Marketing Manager at GKB.

Meanwhile, a great demand on HD-over-coaxial solutions is seen in the verticals with critical environment and larger area to be covered with such as factories and critical infrastructures. Although Asian market shows more interests in HD-over-coaxial solutions in the past, European countries with higher CCTV deployment density, such as the UK, is full of business potential as well, according to Wang.

 

 

                          

 

***Held from April 28 to 30 at Taipei, Taiwan, secutech gathers the world's most important manufacturers who will display a wide variety of CCTV Upgrades' products.
To find out more, please click here.

 

 

HID Global shares top secure identity trends for 2015

HID Global shares top secure identity trends for 2015

Editor / Provider: HID Global | Updated: 1/23/2015 | Article type: Security 50

HID Global®, a worldwide leader in secure identity solutions, issued its outlook on technology trends for 2015, as well as other anticipated developments across key vertical industries in the secure identity marketplace. The annual assessment is intended to help organizations understand and take advantage of the latest advances to improve security, convenience and the user experience.

Growing adoption of interoperable technologies based on open standards continues to spur innovation at an unprecedented pace.

“This past year laid the foundation for what we expect to be an exciting 2015 for our customers and partners as they continue to benefit from the flexibility, adaptability and new capabilities made possible with award-winning Seos® technology,” said Dr. Selva Selvaratnam, senior vice president and chief technology officer with HID Global. “Whether it's moving campus IDs onto smartphones, or centralizing all identity management for protecting doors, data and cloud-based applications, or securing electronic medical prescriptions and ATM transactions, we will see the transformation of our customers' experience using secure identities during the coming year, and beyond.”

Driving new capabilities across markets are a set of six key technology trends that Dr. Selvaratnam has identified, including:
* Increased innovation fueled by interoperable technologies that enable partners to build new solutions (secure print authentication, EV charging station access, and more) that can be accessed with the same smart card or smartphone used to open doors.
* The adoption of new credential form factors.
* Additional ways to open doors and other entrance systems.
* Advances in how to manage identities.
* Using biometrics to help change security from a barrier to a guardrail.
* The growing popularity of interconnected devices and the Internet of Things (IoT), where Wi-Fi locks, RFID-enabled devices, online hotel locks, and mobile keys are all connected ways of interacting or capturing data for the benefit of companies or consumers.

In addition, Dr. Selvaratnam highlighted a number of trends to watch across the following eight vertical market segments:
* Banking and financial institutions: Physical and logical security will continue to converge into unified solutions, against the backdrop of a mobile transformation in consumer banking, the U.S. move to EMV credit and debit cards, and the early phases of biometric authentication at the ATM.
* Hospitals and healthcare institutions: The latest secure identity solutions will play a pivotal role in securing the facility, narcotic prescriptions and personal health information, and will also be used outside the hospital to verify “proof of presence” for home health service delivery.
* Education: As the transition from magnetic stripe (magstripe) and proximity (prox) to high-frequency contactless smart cards continues, universities will also move campus IDs onto smartphones and other mobile devices using systems that can manage multiple ID numbers for multiple uses on multiple platforms.
* Federal government: Government-wide upgrades to new, more secure access control technology will extend beyond the desktop to the door, using both cards and mobile phones, and rigorous secure issuance requirements will drive the growing need for certified and approved printers.
* Government ID: Worldwide demand will grow for end-to-end, highly secure government-to-citizen ID solutions, along with small-footprint, industrial-strength printers that combine flexibility and security, reduce infrastructure investments, and maximize throughput.
* Transportation: IP-based access control will grow in importance across the transportation segment, improving security by integrating a physical access control system (PACS) with other solutions on the same network. Meanwhile, biometric systems will offer an opportunity to increase security and profits in both commercial and personal transportation applications.
* Enterprise: Organizations will increasingly need to improve security at the door, for their data, and in the cloud, and will move to converged solutions while simultaneously accelerating the move beyond passwords to strong authentication across numerous physical and logical access control applications.
* Retail: The biggest focus will continue to be defending against threats such as those experienced by Target Corporation and other major retailers. Other growth areas include mobile IDs, the Internet of Things, integrated biometric authentication, brand protection solutions that validate the authenticity of goods, trusted “proof of presence” applications for digital out-of-home (DOOH) media campaigns, and instant issuance solutions for branded credit and loyalty cards.

Software House gains FIPS 140-2 validation for iSTAR door controllers

Software House gains FIPS 140-2 validation for iSTAR door controllers

Editor / Provider: Software House | Updated: 1/23/2015 | Article type: Security 50

Software House, part of the Security Products business unit of Tyco, the world's largest pure-play fire protection and security company, announces the certification of its iSTAR Edge and iSTAR Ultra door controllers under the government's Federal Information Processing Standards Publications (FIPS) 140-2 program, the most stringent standard for cryptographic products. With the certification of iSTAR Edge and iSTAR Ultra, Software House becomes the first company to offer a full lineup of FIPS 140-2 approved controllers covering a wide range of access control scenarios.

With the certification of iSTAR Edge and iSTAR Ultra, Software House becomes the first company to offer a full lineup of FIPS 140-2 approved controllers covering a wide range of access control scenarios.

FIPS 140-2 is an information technology security validation program that certifies products and systems for use in government-run and other highly regulated industries, such as finance and healthcare, where sensitive information is collected, stored, and shared. The FIPS 140-2 requirements are among the government's most stringent requirements for product design, documentation, and secure operations.

“The certification of these physical access controllers addresses two of our government and enterprise customers' most critical needs: compliance and choice,” said Rick Focke, Senior Product Manager, Tyco Security Products. “Receiving FIPS 140-2 validation ensures the products' conformity for use with sensitive information, while offering multiple products with this key certification makes Software House's iSTAR line the most versatile choice on the market today.”

iSTAR Edge is an IP-based edge device serving smaller one- to four-door PoE network applications, while the powerful and scalable iSTAR Ultra, which is built on the Linux platform, supports up to 32 readers. Software House also offers iSTAR eX, an Ethernet-ready four- to eight-door controller which has already been FIPS 140-2 validated.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 >Next >Last Page