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Banks cash in on integrated, scalable systems

Banks cash in on integrated, scalable systems

Editor / Provider: Israel Gogol, Freelancer, a&s International | Updated: 1/27/2015 | Article type: Commercial Markets

In recent years the most talked-about security threats to banks have been cybercrimes and fraud. Though it seems that traditional security systems are no longer in the spotlight; banks still make substantial investment in their physical security systems. Changes in the design and layout of banks as well as banks' desire to make the most out of their installed systems have great impact on the design and implementation of current security systems.

Banks hold the great responsibility of keeping our money safe. Even though most of this money is now in the form of electronic bits and bytes, banks are still one of the first associations when we think of security and surveillance systems.

Banks usually balance the mix of their security systems between discrete and unobtrusive systems such as emergency buttons and small hidden cameras (e.g., at the counter area or an ATM pinhole camera) and more visible measures such as guards and larger cameras. The visible security systems serve a double purpose, both deterring potential violators as well as giving customers a feeling the bank is indeed a safe place to keep their money. Surveillance systems installed in banks will usually combine several cameras with different functionality. Outside the bank infrared cameras will provide day and night monitoring. Inside the branch, dome and bullet cameras are used for lobby and counter monitoring for clear picture capturing and forensic evidence. The main purpose of these cameras is to prevent illegal intrusion by unauthorized people as well as monitoring the office environment to prevent property loss.

CHALLENGES OF THE BANKING VERTICAL
A major obstacle facing security companies and systems integrators is aligning the security needs of individual branch locations with the requirements outlined by the corporate headquarters. “Securing the bank branches themselves is different from securing a corporate headquarters or data center location, as branches are more often the targets for criminals since it's assumed that's where the money is located,” explained Matt Frowert, Director of Marketing for Financial Services at Tyco Integrated Security. Therefore, the standard level of security and defense are more in-depth at a branch than for a corporate office. Many times legacy systems, or different versions of the same platform, may be found in different regional branches of the same institution within a country, which makes centralized management difficult. In addition, there may be internal resistance to changes or upgrades that the corporate standards demand due to funding constraints, or the local staff being inexperienced and lacking training regarding proper security measures and systems. Another challenge may simply be a matter of timing and scheduling; implementing major technology upgrades across very large financial institutions with many branches and offices.

NEW BANK LAYOUTS
In recent years banks have been changing their traditional set-up to be more appealing to customers. There are more “light” branches located inside shopping malls and supermarkets. Traditional branch layout and design have also changed and now include more open floor plans and fewer staff which are tasked with broader responsibilities. “More in-branch automation and systems found in these new types of banks very likely means that they may not have the same levels of cash that traditional branches have,” added Frowert. “During a robbery attempt, the suspect may be confused when he discovers there is limited teller cash and no safe like there would be in a traditional bank set-up. These new frameworks for bank branches will affect the security of the customers themselves and the bank's security model for protection,” he explained.

As a result, emphasis is placed on new systems that offer increased ATM protection through anti-skimming technology, access control, and proper lighting measures for ATM vestibules to help ensure customers are properly protected.

BENEFITS OF INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR BANKS
Like any other enterprise, banks require their systems provide security, safety, efficiency, and cost saving. “Normally, powerful VMS software can integrate four systems, such as video monitors, access control, alarm systems, and the intercom system, which are used to communicate with bank clients at other locations, for example using an ATM at a different site,” said Nathan Chen, Solution and Product Manager at Dahua Technology. In turn, each system includes several components: alarm systems for example will include fire alarms, seismic sensors to detect if someone is digging into the bank, and emergency buttons. Access control systems will combine card readers, biometrics, magnetic door sensors, etc. This provides banks with an integrated solution instead of four stand-alone systems. In addition, sensors such as smoke detectors or temperature sensors are now built in the cameras and can send alarms directly to the DVR system. This way the bank can benefit from having several sensors on one platform and cut costs.

Systems integration is also critical for protection against insider threats by employees which can be very costly. “An increasingly popular step in mitigating insider threats through an integrated security system includes linking access control to identity management,” explained Frowert. By integrating these systems, financial institutions can restrict employee access to sensitive areas, track entry/exit times by employee or department, and use a log correlation engine or security information and event management (SIEM) system to log, monitor, and audit employee actions. By monitoring these types of systems, managers may notice individual employees trying to access part of the building they are not authorized for, which is activity they can then flag and subsequently continue to monitor the employee's behavior for other activity that might lead to an insider incident.

HYBRID DVRs AND NVRs
Hybrid DVRs and NVRs allow the integration of both existing analog cameras and newer IP cameras. The use of hybrid DVRs and NVRs can therefore help banks make the most out of their existing legacy systems and give them the flexibility they need in adding more cameras or testing new cameras and technologies.

“Our customers are interested in how they can protect their investments in legacy infrastructure while also taking advantage of the benefits of newer technology. There is an increasing move towards new NVRs because they can prolong the use of video surveillance systems as well as provide enhanced features to end users,” iterated Stefano Torri, European Sales Director of March Networks (an Infinova Company). These provide both analog and IP camera support and allow organizations to test and deploy IP cameras selectively, alongside existing analog cameras. “Banks are thinking about the broader benefits of the technology they use, so for example, NVR technology provides advances in video compression and storage management compared to earlier DVRs, and the use of H.264 compression, optimized to limit video signal noise, makes images clearer while reducing the use of bandwidth and storage. These things are important if a bank wants to tag video based on user-defined criteria, such as motion detection, transaction events, or alarms. Software that delivers intelligence and analytics is also a growing trend amongst banks and financial institutions,” he added.

ANALYTICS
An example of an analytics function used in banks is loitering detection, detecting for instance when a person lingers around an ATM machine. If such an event is detected, security personnel can then access the video recording in real-time and make a decision if further action is needed. Analytics can also provide information on customer behaviors (e.g., people counting, queue monitoring) which can be shared across the organization to improve not only security surveillance but also customer service and marketing. For example banks can analyze dwell and wait time at branches and change branch staffing appropriately to make sure there are enough tellers to service the waiting clients.

Apart from connecting the different systems in the branches, banks can also share information between locations. This feature has been gaining traction and makes security more comprehensive. Intelligent video applications allow an internal investigator to track fraudulent transactions and alert branches. “For example, entering a stolen card number into the system will deliver brief video clips of every associated transaction from anywhere across the entire retail banking network,” explained Torri. Not only can security managers easily export this information to branch managers, but they can also present it as integrated case evidence to the police.

KEYLESS ENTRY
Apart from using video analytics, banks are using intrusion detection and keyless entry to improve security measures and increase cost effectiveness. Replacing or re-keying traditional locks can cost a bank up to US$3 million in just one year. To mitigate the risks and costs associated with using traditional keys, banks are implementing new, wireless locks which work with inexpensive access cards to open entry doors. These new technologies also provide audit friendly reporting for the activities of any individual or of a specific entry point in the branch.

OPPORTUNITIES IN BANKING
Banks are relatively conservative players in the security market usually waiting to implement tried and tested solutions. Due to their large scale and many sites, frequent changes of security systems are not likely. Therefore solutions that help banks take advantage of their existing systems, integrate several functionalities together, and introduce newer technologies will be the choice for the banking vertical.

5 Tips for a Successful Security Installation in Banking
Matt Frowert, Director of Marketing for Financial Services at Tyco Integrated Security, provided the following five tips for banks when deploying a security surveillance system.

  1. Find an experienced integrator who specializes in bank physical security. 
  2.  Look for a partner who can support everything from single bank branches all the way up to money center banking models (banks who deal with governments, large corporations, and other banks).
  3. Network with security affinity groups of industry organizations, like the American Bankers Association, to receive recommendations on vendors from other banks in your area.
  4. Standardize on leading access, video, and intrusion systems supported by vendors that have a track record of investing in technology. 
  5. Invest in communication with and training of banking staff to enable them to effectively use the systems (e.g., arming the alarms at the branch level, managing the distribution of codes at the branch level, etc.).

Dahua enhances video surveillance for Bank of Brazil

Dahua enhances video surveillance for Bank of Brazil

Editor / Provider: Dahua | Updated: 1/13/2015 | Article type: Commercial Markets

Dahua Technology, a world-leading manufacturer and supplier of video surveillance products headquartered in Hangzhou, China collaborated with Banco do Brasil S.A. (Bank of Brazil) for upgrading DVRs and analog cameras in its bank security system. The project is not only involves many cities in Brazil but also used more than 20,000 units of analog cameras and 1,500 units of DVRs.

Banco do BrasilS.A. (Bank of Brazil) is the largest Brazilian and Latin American bank by assets, and the third by market value which headquartered in Brasília, founded in 1808. It is the oldest active bank in Brazil, and one of the oldest financial institutions in the world.

As time goes by, bank security has been as important factor in safeguarding investment, people and assets. The products that Bank of Brazil been used before were klunky, unstable and less compatible. Lately they decided to replace DVRs and analog cameras to upgrade their whole bank security system. The first thing Dahua impress them was the compatibility of the products. The DVRs and analog cameras could accordance with its original system perfectly. Meanwhile the monitor center was set in the control centre room which Dahua offered.

Digital Video Recorder: DVR2116H from Dahua is an entry-level DVR which features H.264 dual-stream video compression and supports 1 SATA HDD up to 4TB, 2 USB interfaces are available and supports mobile P2P function. In order to meet the requirements from the bank, Dahua tested each version of the products to get the optimal one.

Analog cameras: the bank was familiar with Dahua's analog cameras based on its good reputation. After all the tests, Dahua ensured all the analog cameras are capable of optimized infrared effect, color adjustment and faster responding to color conversion.

Command & control center: command & control center is an integrated system which consists of computer and management software. It is able to receive all the signals from the sensors, video cameras, access control systems, detection and anti-burglary alarm, fire detection and signaling systems. The control center system which is provided by Dahua features information unification management and equipment setting up.

The potential loss of funds may happen anytime in the bank, therefore put the right products inside and out would help the bank to catch thieves, protect customers and other serious problems that threaten it. Dahua's bank solution is about to keep the bank away from the trends, which guarantees a prolonged useful life of all the products such as lower maintenance.

“This is a surely successful cooperation for both of Dahua and Bank of Brazil. We are looking forward further cooperation with Bank of Brazil after we upgraded its DVRs.” said William Zhou, Sales Director of Latin-America and Africa at Dahua Technology. “Dahua provided fully technical support to the bank in order to ensure the project successfully. We are hoping the bank could become one of the oldest banks in the world but within the advanced surveillance products and solutions. ”

Hikvision and EMCS in partnership to introduce CCTV Sentry Smart monitoring system

Hikvision and EMCS in partnership to introduce CCTV Sentry Smart monitoring system

Editor / Provider: Hikvision | Updated: 1/9/2015 | Article type: Security 50

Hikvision is expanding the opportunities for comprehensive CCTV system checks through a unique partnership with EMCS, one of the UK's largest independent monitoring stations. EMCS will use their CCTV Sentry software to proactively monitor every customers' CCTV system, not just those that traditionally opt for a monitored solution, and send an email if any problem is detected and Hikvision has ensured that its entire range of DVR, NVR, Hybrid, and HD-SDI products is 100% compatible.

EMCS has worked closely with Hikvision to roll out this comprehensive system checking service to the 80% of customers that have not, until now, had their CCTV systems monitored. Every Hikvision DVR is now compatible with CCTV Sentry and provides information on camera and hard disk failures, recording issues and time accuracy problems. As well as email alerts, CCTV Sentry customers can view a live status webpage on a smartphone, anywhere, anytime.

"As a result of our partnership with EMCS, CCTV Sentry will now be available to every multi-site organisation where a fully-functional CCTV system is a necessity, such as retail, banking, hotels, education, logistics, transportation and critical infrastructure," says Keen Yao, International Marketing Director of Hikvision. "It provides all EMCS customers with a valuable and highly proactive maintenance service tool to help ensure that their CCTV systems are fully operational 24/7."

According to Mark Hewerdine, CCTV Manager at EMCS, "Our customers can be rightly confident in the knowledge that all Hikvision's products are 100% compatible with CCTV Sentry, competitively priced, easy to use and, most importantly, stable and reliable."

Keen Yao adds, "Integrating CCTV Sentry into EMCS' standard alarm panel is a breakthrough for sites with unmonitored CCTV installations, allowing them to be alerted when a fault happens rather than finding out after an incident has occurred. It also means the team at EMCS can offer an immediate visual check for an intruder if an alarm is triggered.

"We bring a totally transparent approach to working with all our technical partners and are proud to stand behind EMCS in their roll-out of CCTV Sentry."

Incident management and LPR secure Resorts World Casino New York

Incident management and LPR secure Resorts World Casino New York

Editor / Provider: iView Systems | Updated: 1/6/2015 | Article type: Commercial Markets

Resorts World Casino New York City is New York's first world-class gaming casino connected to the famous Aqueduct racetrack in South Ozone Park, Queens, and has played host to some of Thoroughbred racing's biggest heroes over the years. With over 400,000 square feet of gaming facilities and a 70,000 square feet event space for big-ticket events, Resorts World Casino employs over 1,300 people and sees an average of 20,000 guests daily, utilizing 6,500 parking spots. Resorts World New York has implemented state-of-the-art security and surveillance technologies to ensure the safety and security of their facility, guests, and personnel.

The Business Challenge
Since opening its doors in October 2011, Resorts World Casino continues to have solid growth and record revenues. Unfortunately, with success also comes a number of persistent security issues from both insiders and outsiders. The casino handles numerous security incidents every single day, including common incidents such as theft, unwanted banned patrons, personal injuries, vandalism, etc. Even a routine incident can often take an inordinate amount of manpower and, if not handled in a timely manner, can compromise business operations and services and potentially cause exposure to liability. The process of recording, tracking, and reporting was a manual process that inhibited the investigation and reporting process. Information was inconsistent and not readily retrievable, and media files were often not associated with an incident. Compiling meaningful reports was a lengthy and onerous task, making it difficult to correlate events to identify areas of risk and optimize staff allocation. Jason Arnett, Director of Surveillance of Resorts World New York initiated the project to automate their security reporting, mitigate risk, and improve efficiencies. Arnett looked to iView Systems' gaming experts for an integrated security and risk management solution to automate their incident reporting, daily log, officer dispatch, and lost and found functions, as well as to identify and track employees and visitors.

The Solution
With iView Systems' experience in the gaming industry and Resort World sister casino in Singapore already using iView Systems technology for security and surveillance reporting, Arnett looked to Tony Day, Senior Account Executive for iView Systems, to map out their security and surveillance reporting needs. “They required an incident reporting and risk management system that would allow them to document all daily activity and incidents, along with the ability to include supporting evidence such as media files or individual reports. Additionally, Resorts World required the capability to track all personnel and vehicles, as well as manage and control details such as lost and found items, visitor management, employee audits, and document disputes, and provide player analysis by surveillance,” Day said.

In addition to tracking and reporting incident and events, Resorts World has implemented a layered approach to detect, deter, and resolve issues in a proactive manner.

iView's visitor management system checks in and monitors contractors and vendors or suppliers' access to the property. With so many suppliers coming and going at all hours, the system provides detailed logs of visits and screens against watch lists, which aides with access, accountability, and compliance. “We're able to pre-register visitors and ensure contractors and suppliers are in compliance with licensing and insurance regulations and non-disclosure agreements in advance. Pre-registration can be online or we can register them as they arrive, and identification badges are quickly printed using driver's licenses,” stated Arnett.

iView's license plate recognition (LPR) system monitors vehicle activity by reading and identifying license plate numbers as they enter the property. “The LPR system has proved be a tremendous advantage to proactive security management measures by assisting security in dealing with and intercepting unwanted or known individuals who have been identified on the watch, ban, or VIP list, before entering the casino,” said Arnett. The license plate cameras automatically trigger a notification alert if a license plate match is found, and security or police services are dispatched to investigate. “The license plate recognition is extremely accurate and provides a low-key and proactive approach without additional resources and enables us to shift from reaction to prevention mode,” said Arnett. Resorts World New York works with the local police agencies to monitor suspicious vehicles, and video footage provides law enforcement necessary documentation during legal action.

The Benefits
By deploying the fully integrated Incident Reporting and Risk Management solution, Resorts World is now well equipped to document, share and manage all of their security and surveillance information between necessary departments. Resorts World transformed their cumbersome manual processing into a high performance security risk management solution reaping real dividends which include:

* Automated Data Searching & Querying saved 68hours/ month searching and compiling single or multiple search criteria with the ability to save standard daily, weekly, monthly customized report filters as required.

* Incident Reporting produced a time savings of 76hours/ month with iTrak's central data repository providing detailed incident and advanced reporting statistics.

* Automated Identification & Notifications of trespass/ banned subjects on property, saves processing time and aids police with evidence, resulted in a savings of $10,133.76/year.

* Automated Dispatch Reporting saved 182 hours/month.

* Structured Data Collection & Reporting is simple, fast, accurate, date time stamped, consistent to reduce tedious, error-prone data entry, with documented audit trail is secure, searchable, instant statistical reporting and distribution.

* Incidents & Investigations - Ability to capture complete story, video, scanned documents, external files, links to long term DVR storage, real time video capture, legal and procedural form automation (Use of Force, WSIB, Trespass).

* Segmented Views all of incidents, correlates subjects, personnel and contact information.

* Cross-functional Communication of incidents, BOLO's. as well as Shift and Personnel Briefings were vastly improved with speed and efficiency.

* Minimum Training requirements provided for fast user readiness.

“We did not expect to see such significant benefits so quickly”, states Arnett. “By automating our security and surveillance functions, we have saved considerable man-hours reporting, searching and querying, not to mention the increased integrity of our data collected. We were able to realize full return on investment in just 4.5 months”.

“The security and surveillance staff immediately felt at ease using the software, given the simplicity and accuracy of the user interface. The software's logical workflow allows us to collect and manage data and rapidly analyze and act, as well as identify trends and share reports with Executive Management.”

In addition to tracking and reporting incident and events, Resorts World has implemented a layered approach to detect, deter and resolve issues in a proactive manner.

The Visitor Management system, iPass, checks in and monitors contractors and vendors/suppliers' access to the property. With so many suppliers coming and going at all hours, the iPass system provides detail logs of visits and screens against watch lists, which aides with access, accountability and compliance. “We're able to pre-register visitors and ensure contractors and suppliers are in compliance with licensing and insurance regulation, non-disclosure agreements in advance. Pre-registration can be online or we can register them as they arrive and identification badges are quickly printed using driver's license,” states Mr. Arnett.

The License Plate Recognition system, iLPR® monitors vehicle activity by reading and identifying license plate numbers as they enter the property. “The iLPR® system has proved be a tremendous advantage to proactive security management measures by assisting security to deal with and intercept unwanted or known individuals who have been identified on the watch, ban or VIP list, before entering the casino” says Arnett. The license plate cameras automatically trigger a notification alert if a license plate match is found, and security or police services are dispatched to investigate. “The license plate recognition system is extremely accurate and provides a low-key and proactive approach without additional resources and enabled us to shift from reaction to prevention mode”, said Arnett. Resorts World NY works with the local police agencies to monitor suspicious vehicles and video footage provides law enforcement necessary documentation during legal action.

Conclusion
“By automating and digitizing our security and surveillance data on one central reporting platform, we have achieved order, structure, and control on our data, allowing us to shift from reactive to preventive measures,” said Arnett. “The ability to have a complete briefing logs, complete with a full subjects history including media files and having the ability to share with our internal departments and outside networks using iView's intelligent video network has improved our communication and helps reduce potential losses or issues associated with advantage team play, shoplifting, fraud, and other undesirables,” stated Arnett.

“Resorts World New York has identified and embraced the holistic benefits of layering security and surveillance to incorporate the key cornerstones of people, process, and technology into their security and surveillance framework. iView's incident reporting and risk management system's fully converged platform manages a multitude of transactions and tasks including incident, visitor, and identification management. Resorts World New York is a model property implementing appropriate measures to safeguard the physical property and to minimize risks and operating costs through security layering,” stated Day.

Singapore holds the smart key to success

Singapore holds the smart key to success

Editor / Provider: Lisa Hsu, a&s Asia | Updated: 12/30/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Singapore, one of the most innovative countries in Asia Pacific, is taking matters into its own hands. With the economy and political issues that have pushed the country to further employ automated systems, Singapore is at the forefront of smart technology.

Rated as one of the top places in the world to do business, Singapore is home to many multinational company regional headquarters. With an English-speaking environment and highly developed infrastructure, Singapore is an ideal country for companies to expand to other Southeast Asian nations. As a hub of the Southeast Asian region, the country is famous for a high level of technology adoption. In recent years, its trend migrates to smart and intelligent technologies in the Singaporean security industry. The foreign worker policy has further pushed Singapore's adoption of new technology to help reduce manpower and save cost on human monitoring due to the tight labor market. Both government and commercial projects are growing in recent years, employing additional use of smart technology. According to Rick Huang, Business Development Manager at Alstron, the government is looking at using cameras with suitable back-end VCA solutions to improve productivity to replace labor intensive jobs like traffic monitoring and illegal parking. Ken Lee Kim Keong, Director of KZTech explained, “there are already many analytical software companies entering the market, and projects releasing from both commercial and government sectors are putting VCA as part of the package.”

“In the low-end market, it is obvious that the customers are after box solutions, where packages offer hardware with software solutions. While in the high-end market, the end users are after value adding through application driven products (surveillance) where they have the freedom to choose applications for their video centric operation needs,” said Sunny Kong, Director of Sales for APAC at Milestone Systems.

SMART SOLUTIONS FOR PROJECTS
A “smart” solution conceptually is a breakthrough for energy conservation, management, and monitoring in buildings and campuses through a mean of enhancing energy efficiency, data center reliability, comfort and analytics, according to Kenneth Tsang, Director of R&D and Technical Services, Video & Situation Intelligent Solutions for Verint Systems.

Transportation
There are a number of promising projects rolling out in recent years using smart technology. They can be seen in various verticals, one of which is transportation. Recent projects include use of surveillance and custom software solutions to detect illegal parking in pickup areas along mass rapid transit (MRT) stations. Surveillance solutions with smart software are being implemented to detect speeding cars, and detect over height vehicles that are entering height restricted areas.

The transportation sector has also incorporated smart systems in projects as tourism continues to grow in Singapore due to the opening of Integrated Resorts to attract more visitors. Changi Airport has access control systems and hundreds of intelligent card readers by CEM Systems from Tyco Security Products implemented that support smartcards and fingerprint biometrics. An intelligent building security system was also deployed that is integrated with the Singapore Airlines Human Resources SAP system, an interface with the existing visitor system and digital video surveillance/DVR systems integration. This leads to opportunities for smart security solutions when Terminal 4 of Changi Airport finishes construction in 2017.

Smart Buildings
Demands for security products in smart buildings are likely to be in the aspects of full integration and automation, able to provide time efficient incident management, low maintenance cost, easy-to-use manageable systems, remotely controllable systems without distance limitations, efficient system have the ability to integrate with business continuity management systems. According to Masami Eguchi, GM for APAC at Panasonic System Communications, a lot of video surveillance projects are implementing video surveillance and recording with a high-end VMS system into a single platform.

However, combining intelligent solutions in buildings itself is not a new concept, but with most recent technologies that allow for more integrated solutions, smart buildings will in time be highly sophisticated and automated for the user's needs. For instance, data available for building facilities can be shared across relevant users within the organization for other analyses such as business processing, explained Stella Neo, GM for CSO-Singapore at Bosch Security Systems. “Customers are looking how to best maximize the usage of various systems in the building that contribute to the business, organization efficiency and productivity, e.g., maximize security, maximize communication, maximize safety.”

Education
Opportunities in education are growing, with Singapore working with major educational institutions to reinforce its educational hub status using smart technology. Such technology can be seen in SimonsVoss Technologies' projects at Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), and Yale – National University of Singapore Campus and Hikvision's projects in the National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University.

Hospitality
Solutions used for resort projects incorporate smart technology to secure the premises. ST Electronics was awarded the Resort World Sentosa project, worth US$71.7 million, to provide an integrated security system, network infrastructure, and an intelligent car park system for the facility. CEM Systems from Tyco Security Products was awarded the $6.3 billion Marina Bay Resort project to implement 15,000 card holders, and more than 650 card readers. The project provided for the resort access control, alarm processing, and a photo badging system.

Healthcare
Smart security solutions in healthcare are expected to roll out due to a shrinking workforce and aging population. Smart card technology is used in hospitals for staff and visitors to have access to multiple doors, as well as tracking attendance at staff events or trainings. Regulated by the government's Ministry of Health, more projects are anticipated to launch, considering the government's spending in this sector, said Giridhari Ramamoorthy, Director of Sales and Business Development at Pacom Systems.

SAFE CITY FOR A SAFER CITY
Singapore launched its first safe city test bed initiative last year to explore possibilities of deploying a city-wide integrated surveillance system. Technologies tested and developed in the project included analytics and sensor engines, facial recognition video analytics used in combination with location-aware analytics, and technology to authenticate video streams. Industry players collaborated with the government to develop possible solutions in the urban landscape with real-time data and scenarios through advanced monitoring and analytics. According to Jason P. Kurek, MD of Asia at SimonsVoss Technologies, this enabled the Singapore government to gain awareness of capabilities, solutions, and innovations from the research and development of private sector industry players. “By actively engaging industry players through the test bed platform, Singapore government shall be in a good position to leverage on them to develop innovative capabilities elevating safe city initiative to a greater height. With the government's strong support, it is therefore opined that safety and security industry shall become the next in-thing for Singapore,” said Joshua Kwai, Group CEO of JK Consultancy Holdings Group. With the initiative mandated and encouraged by the government, the safe city market in Singapore will have great potential. According to Tsang, “there will be a need to apply intelligent detection, real-time situation monitoring, and strategic analysis to help the city collect and analyze information faster, manage and respond to situations efficiently, and keep their citizens safe.”

For the future of the safe city initiative, new projects are continuing to roll out. Sensors that will monitor air and water quality, as well as public safety will be deployed at high traffic areas, and various proof of concepts have been completed.

Singapore Turns to Technology
As future projects for safe city are expected to roll out, Singapore is at the forefront as one of the world's top technology hubs. With tight labor markets and rising cost affecting the economy, many are motivated to relook at incorporating smarter and more innovative technologies to move away from a labor intensive security landscape. As the country's economic growth continues to improve, hopefully smart technology is the key Singapore needs to get back on track.

Chinese Players Entering the Market
The entry of China in the world market has triggered heated price competition in Singapore. Introducing products with cheap prices, the government has started incorporating Chinese products in projects due to price budgets. “China-made products have made a great leap into the low cost segment and are also starting moving into government projects,” said Masami Eguchi, GM for APAC at Panasonic System Communications.

Initially, Chinese products were deemed as unreliable and easily worn out, however over the years, the quality of some Chinese brands have improved, gaining approval from the Singapore government. According to Derek Yang, Asia Business Manager at Hikvision Digital Technology, Hikvision's growth rate achieved an exponential amount in sales revenue in Singapore last year, compared to the previous year.

However, it seems that Chinese products are more accepted for basic products, such as cameras and video surveillance systems. Patrick Lim, MD of Ademco Security Group, explained when it comes to more complex systems such as security management platforms and access control, there is still a strong preference for established global brands that can meet the government's quality and unique technical requirements. As Chinese products maintain its product improvement growth and provide adequate support, it will be likely that more and more people will start to use Chinese products due to the low cost.

Government vs. Commercial Sector
The security industry has grown in recent years, as Singapore is keen to maintain the country's position as one of the safest countries in the world. “This is evident in the island-wide installation of security cameras and systems in key areas such as train stations, transportation hubs, highways and roads, public housing estates, and even in low lying areas for flood monitoring,” explained Riki Nishimura, GM of Visual Security Solutions, Professional Solutions Company (PSAP) for APAC at Sony Electronics. In Singapore, both government and commercial projects are growing in recent years, with the government sector taking up a larger market share due to the large quantities required for projects.

The government sector has been the main driver for medium to large project and infrastructures, mainly focusing on surveillance, to ensure the safety of both old and new infrastructures, and to curb crime related incidents. “The government sector will be enhancing many public facilities and infrastructure that were long overdue,” said Patrick Lim, MD of Ademco Security Group. Whereas for the commercial sector, projects rolled out for office, retail, and residential space are suffering from slight excess due to the poor economy. “Both government and commercial sectors are developing in tandem and are entwined, however there are still certain structural and productivity changes that are painful for some sectors of the economy, and the successes of the private sector would be indicative of the success of the implemented policies of the government,” Jason P. Kurek, MD of Asia at SimonsVoss Technologies explained. For instance, big commercial projects such as the Integrated Resorts and Universal Studios in turn add growth to the government sector as well as the commercial sector.

Clarifying the myths of HD-Over-Coaxial solutions

Clarifying the myths of HD-Over-Coaxial solutions

Editor / Provider: Alf Chang, a&s Asia | Updated: 10/20/2014 | Article type: Tech Corner

 

HD-over-coaxial solutions, which transmit high-definition video over coaxial cables, provide an alternative to HD surveillance besides IP. However, there are still doubts and concerns from the market about how they are set up and whether they can truly deliver. This article lists some of the myths concerning HD-over-coaxial and demystifies them one by one.

 

Q: For HDCVI, it's compatible only with its own DVRs. What about HDTVI and AHD? Are they able to connect with any type of DVRs?

A: The answer to this is of course negative. Each HD-over-coaxial solution has its own format and must go with its own DVRs. The only solution that's compatible with all formats is 960H. After initial testing, it was confirmed that different-brand HDTVI and AHD cameras can work with their respective DVRs, as long as the same format is used.

Q: Will HDCVI and HDTVI completely replace 960H, since their picture quality is the same as 960H?

A:
In terms of what the 720p HD-over-coaxial solution can offer, it is indeed very similar to 960H picture quality. However, 960H products still stand out since they are offered and supported by most of the current camera vendors. We can assume in the future, if there are more 1080p HD-over-coaxial solutions being introduced to the market, it will definitely affect the market of 960H or even IP for the SMB sector.

Q: Could the current HD-over-coaxial DVRs support 720p and 1080p at the same time?

A:
The answer is no. Test results show that HDCVI, HDTVI, and AHD each can support 720P and 1080P cameras and corresponding 720P and 1080P DVRs. The issue right now is whether the same DVR can record 720P and 1080P videos at the same time, no matter which technology is employed. This still needs to be confirmed.

Q: When different numbers of HD cameras are used, or when coaxial cables of different lengths or grades are used, would there be any signal loss issues? Experience dictates that when signals are transmitted through different-length coaxial cables, the disparity in voltage may cause poor reflection of images, which may appear to be stacking up on one another. Or, the difference in electrical grounding may create noise. Will this also affect HD-over-coaxial?

A: The answer is yes, due to the lack of equalizers in HD-over-coaxial DVRs at the current stage.

Q: From a project implementation perspective, does transmission distance for HDCVI, HDTVI, and AHD matter? Is it a key factor to consider?

A:
Another good question. Each HD-over-coaxial solution claims to be able to transmit over a distance of 300 to 500 meters, or even 600 to 1,000 meters. First, we must applaud HD-over-coaxial for breaking the distance barrier. Yet from a project perspective, this doesn't really mean anything. First, in the past, transmission over a 5C-2V cable without a booster can go for 200 to 225 meters. With booster, transmission can be extended to over 400 meters. Yet quality loss is a byproduct of signal boosting, as noise is augmented. So for any coaxial implementation, shorter distances are preferred due to reliability. To transmit beyond 500 meters without sacrificing picture quality or reducing the number of cameras, what's usually done is the usage of multimode fiber for distances of three to five kilometers or single-mode fiber for longer distances. With a dense wavelength division multiplexing device, one multimode fiber or single-mode fiber can transmit four to 32 streams. In other words, from a project perspective, transmission distance is not an issue and is not a determining factor for choosing between HDCVI, HDTVI, and AHD.

Q: With HDCVI, HDTVI, and AHD breaking traditional distance barriers, can they really help with larger projects, or are they more suitable for SMEs?

A: No matter what grade of coax cable you use, it's just a medium. Transmission distance really depends on the system and voltage. The size of project depends on several things – for example, whether there will be compatible matrix systems like those used for HD-SDI, or HD DVRs that support more channels. Only by then will the discussion of which solution suits which type of project be more meaningful. For now, HD-over-coaxial is implemented in the same way as traditional analog, namely for small- to medium-size projects through a DVR+CMS architecture.

The above were answers to questions commonly asked of HD-over-coaxial solutions. Once they are more widespread in the market, there will surely be more questions concerning their technology and applications. That's when HD-over-coaxial will truly become a game changer.

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AXIS Camera Companion supplies security solution to smaller retailers in UK

AXIS Camera Companion supplies security solution to smaller retailers in UK

Editor / Provider: Axis | Updated: 12/9/2014 | Article type: Commercial Markets

Axis led a proof of concept trial for a Nisa Local store in Birmingham (Nisa), in which Axis partner, Defence Security, was brought in to complete the fit-out and optimization phase of the installation. The project formed the final stage of an innovations showcase for the Association of Convenience Stores, where Axis had successfully demonstrated the ways in which the AXIS Camera Companion package was ideally suited for smaller retailers.

Birmingham Nisa store owner, Rav Garcha, challenged Axis to expand the functionality of his store's current analogue surveillance set-up – including remote central monitoring, mobile accessibility, and the option to integrate cross-functional retail analytics.

Solution
Axis partner, Defence Security, installed a state-of-theart surveillance system which incorporated AXIS Camera Companion for independent retailers. Featuring 13 ultra-compact HDTV quality cameras that requiring no digital video recording (DVR) equipment and offering an easy to access intuitive management platform, the solution perfectly fit the store's security requirements, whilst providing ample scope for upgrades and expansion.

Result
Despite reducing the store's overall camera count, the new AXIS Camera Companion package has significantly increased surveillance coverage in-store, as measured against the retailer's historic analogue system. The phenomenal success of the installation at the Hockley store has resulted in the installation of a network video encoder at Nisa Broadway. Customer, Rav Garcha, plans to replicate the Axis system with the acquisition of more stores.

The most innovative solution available
Axis began working with Nisa store owner, Rav Garcha, after it was invited to attend an innovations showcase for the Association of Convenience Stores. One of four companies selected to pitch ideas for the workshop, the AXIS Camera Companion security solution was voted ‘most innovative' by the audience and a three-person judging panel. Axis partner, Defence Security was chosen to incorporate the solution into the Birmingham Nisa store, following an initial proof of concept trial.

Perfectly designed for small business users
While the store already had an analogue surveillance system in place, the retailer was keen to embrace the potential of networked video. Dave Brown, business development manager at Defence Security, said: “The store's legacy system really wasn't fit for purpose. It often experienced faults and system failures and needed a wholesale upgrade. In comparison, the flexibility and image quality offered by Axis is streaks ahead. Even its smallest camera achieves two-and-a-half times the picture quality of most analogue systems.”

As part of the store's upgrade, Defence Security replaced 16 conventional CCTV cameras with a range of Axis compact dome and fixed lens network cameras. Variously featuring video motion detection, active tampering alarm, two-way audio and integrated passive infrared sensors, the cameras capture the entire store in full HDTV image quality. An inbuilt microphone and speaker system also allows staff to communicate directly with customers at the critical point of sale area in the store. The camera's superior image quality and reliability also means that footage is of evidential quality and certified for use in court.

Rav commented: “The great picture quality and advanced audio detection features are incredibly important. In the past, we've experienced armed robberies and several incidences of abusive behaviour and threats being made towards staff. Axis' cameras can be relied upon to not only see these incidents in perfect detail, but they can also hear and record what is being said.”

Adapted to the retail environment
Using Axis' Corridor Format, the cameras records footage in a vertical aspect ratio, which is better suited for monitoring narrow aisles than traditional landscape formats. The systems is also fully open to future high-spec integrations that use surveillance data to analyse staff levels, peak trading hours, customer footfall and purchasing behaviour. Data can also be collated to inform staffing policy, store layouts and the relative success of special promotions or offers.

As space is always at a premium for retailers, a major advantage of the new Axis system is that it does not require DVR equipment and, unlike analogue equipment, can easily be scaled up or down according to the store's needs. Security managers can easily access and view live camera footage or download video files, either in-store, or remotely. As well as instant-access live view of the Hockley store, analogue camera feeds from Nisa Broadway (Worcester) have also been incorporated into the platform via the use of and Axis video encoder. Rav said: “We've been incredibly impressed with the entire AXIS Camera Companion package – from ease of installation, right through to the end product. We now have a bespoke surveillance setup and analytics capability that will make a real difference to business profitability.”

Honeywell adds high definition IP video kits to performance series line

Honeywell adds high definition IP video kits to performance series line

Editor / Provider: Honeywell | Updated: 12/4/2014 | Article type: Security 50

 

Honeywell is now offering bundled IP Video kits that give small to mid-size businesses a hassle-free option for upgrading to high definition IP video. The kits consist of Honeywell's new four-channel embedded NVR with four ball or four bullet style high definition IP cameras. These kits are affordable, easy to install and provide a complete end-to-end video surveillance solution.

 

“The common problem for NVR systems is that they're too expensive and too difficult to install, so many organisations stick to what they know, which is the standard analogue DVR system,” said Uli Hopfstock, product manager EMEA, “Our Performance Series' IP kits address those concerns by providing a cost-effective, easy-to-install system that makes IP video a greater reality for organisations with cash-strapped budgets. It's as easy to set up as a DVR.”

The simple, low-profile camera designs are ideal for tight spaces, and built-in Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) simplifies camera installation through plug-and-play functionality, saving time and costs. An intuitive setup wizard makes the system easy to configure, maintain, and manage. End users can also program the system to record only when motion is detected to maximize the system's efficiency. The network connected system allows business owners to view video from smartphones, tablets and computers. E-mail alerts can be programmed to warn users of network failures or motion detection.

China brings the world security market to a reshuffle

China brings the world security market to a reshuffle

Editor / Provider: JOHN SHI, a&s Asia | Updated: 12/1/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Over the past two years, China-made products have become more popular in global markets, a phenomenon that not only impacted Asia's manufacturing landscape but also the whole distribution channel. All players across the supply chain are faced with eroding profits and are looking for ways to find new revenue streams. Many traditional players who were unable to respond to this change have been pushed out of the market. International brand suppliers facing China's price competition are also looking for ways to increase their products' cost-performance ratios. Despite all this, China should still be given credit for driving this price reduction that has led to more affordable products, a fast growth of the SMB market, and increased security awareness among the general public.

Changing Asia's Manufacturing Landscape
In 2007, we interviewed several Secutech Expo visitors, most of whom were importers coming to Asia to purchase security equipment. Taiwan products were their favorite, for no other reason than Taiwan's ability to manufacture, customize, and offer excellent service and technical support. At that time, the general impression was that China-made products were of inferior quality. Some importers who went to China to work with local companies eventually returned to their Taiwan and Korean partners. Yet, few importers voiced the opinion that China still had good manufacturers — you just have to dig them out.

In but a few years, things have changed. Thanks to the emergence of CMOS sensors and SoCs used for IP cameras, which significantly lowered the threshold for entering the camera business, Chinese manufacturers seized this opportunity and entered the camera market. With the already huge share in the DVR sector, the Chinese were able to complete their product lines covering both frontend and backend devices. Also, with quality control enhancement, China has significantly improved quality and reliability issues that once drew criticism.

Besides the aforementioned factors, China manufacturers hold another key advantage: its vast domestic market, which provides all the necessary elements for ensuring their further growth. China's domestic market that is the world's largest not only provides a stable source of revenue but also offers a training ground for manufacturers to test their products and create more applications. Within years of development in its local market, Chinese manufacturers now are able to compete with or even take huge market share from the multinationals in China.

Another thing that is unique about Chinese manufacturers is that they're not satisfied just with their domestic market; they also embrace the world. Among them, Hikvision and ZKTech not only see high revenues but also vaunt a host of overseas branches that have infiltrated into local markets.

China's growing influence in the world has led to a decline for both Korea and Taiwan manufacturing over the past years. Manufacturers from both regions couldn't directly compete with the Chinese heavyweights and therefore had to reposition themselves to find their own market niches. An example was IDIS, the Korean DVR manufacturer. Years ago, I interviewed its CEO and asked him about the choice between OEM and “own brand name.” Without hesitation, he said he would never think about the latter option, as it may lead to direct competition with clients. Yet, with China's growing expansion, IDIS last year completely repositioned itself and began to launch its own brand in Europe. How the future Asian manufacturing landscape will evolve is something worth observing.

Growing Market Acceptance for Chinese Products
Besides improving the quality of their products, Chinese manufacturers have also raised their English proficiency and learned ways of doing business internationally in the midst of globalization. Products' outstanding cost-performance ratios have helped vendors win more customers and business. Among these companies, some have accelerated their internationalization efforts and set up branches or offices overseas to face clients directly. With more competitive products, aggressive sales teams, and large-scale marketing campaigns, Chinese manufacturers have forced people to look at them differently. In the past, Chinese products were mostly used in the private or commercial sector. Over the past year, the trend has been that Chinese products are increasingly found in the government sector for some markets, too. With this, China manufacturers' market influence in different regions is set to grow exponentially. As two examples, China's Hikvision and Dahua had 2013 revenues of US$1.8 billion and $882.6 million, respectively. It's expected both will see their sales figures double by 2016. It can be imagined many firms will see their revenue eaten away by this kind of growth.

China's fast growth will sure expedite a reshuffling of the global security industry. We are wondering how many firms will survive in three years' time.

China Pushes Channels to Transform
Three years ago at an expo, I ran into one of the top three Russian importers. The company had focused primarily on European, U.S., Taiwan, and Korean products yet was now forced to bring in Chinese products. With the influx of Chinese imports in Russia, he had to sell Chinese products or face the prospect of losing all his customers. Yet, according to him, Chinese products had short lifecycles. Once new shipments came in, old ones were put in inventories. Profits were already low, and keeping things in inventories caused importers to lose money. All this for what, he asked.

For systems integrators, things aren't easier, either. With unit price fast falling, projects of the same scope may see price drop by half. That means, to keep revenue on par with last year's, you must get twice as many projects. Yet labor and operation costs haven't gone down an inch. For integrators, their challenge now is how to survive.

Amidst this revolutionary change, to understand what customers want and how technologies will evolve is key to security channel players' survival. Channel players must also change their original “box-moving” mentality that was prevalent during the traditional CCTV era. Maybe they can learn from the example of their IT counterparts: instead of just selling products, they should reposition themselves as “value-added distributors/ resellers” via offering integrated systems and extra services — from getting the right products to pre-sale testing to post-sale service.

Expecting a new order
Besides the influence from China, another troubling trend has emerged. Years ago, people had already raised this question: with surveillance moving into IP, hardware, firmware, and operating systems need to be upgraded constantly. Then, what would become of after-sale service? How would you service systems five years from now? In case an unprofitable integrator goes under in the midst of the price competition, who will maintain systems built by this SI? In Asia, it has come to the point where even maintenance fees are subject to a price war. Whoever gets the order would just do a sloppy job — as long as something doesn't go wrong. In my view, with clearer market differentiation, there are still plenty of market opportunities for many players. The security market will become more specialized in the future. Companies or industries attaching greater importance to security will realize the difference between price and reliability, and they will naturally choose reliability over price. For those who are not so demanding about where video streams are transmitted to during critical moments, they will rely more on the cost-performance ratio. When will the new order arrive? In three years? Five years? I would say it all depends on the expansion of Chinese manufacturing, the speed with which other security manufacturers reposition themselves, and how the Internet of Things is going to greatly influence the security industry.

Hikvision's Turbo HD: Bringing HD quality to an analog system

Hikvision's Turbo HD: Bringing HD quality to an analog system

Editor / Provider: Sponsored by Hikvision | Updated: 9/22/2014 | Article type: Tech Corner

Regardless of whether or not video surveillance is headed toward IP, analog will always have a place in the market. The ease of connection, immediate transmission rate, simple maintenance, and safe and stable application will all keep analog a mainstay in video surveillance. To fit some systems integrators and end users' needs for analog systems, Hikvision launched its first HD analog systems, Turbo HD, ranging from cameras to DVRs.

How does Turbo HD Analog Solution work?
The Turbo HD analog system integrates digital, codecs, modem, and analog transmission technologies, which breaks the limit of 625TVL (not 960H) simulation technology and allows for HD in analog transmission, making it easy for old systems to upgrade to HD.

At the core of Hikvision's Turbo HD analog system is a modem chip that processes HD signals. After the HD signals are captured by the megapixel high-resolution CMOS sensor, the optical image is processed by the image chip and forms uncompressed digital signals, which saves the original information. This imaging principle is basically the same as that of a HD digital camera, but the difference is Turbo HD analog solution adopts analog transmission over coaxial cable, namely, digital signals that are modulated into analog signals by a modulation chip. After HD video signals are transmitted to a back-end DVR, the modulation chip demodulates and uses a codec to compresses them into HD net video signals, which are then stored. The DVR modulation chip can modulate four Turbo HD signals in order to improve efficiency of demodulation.

Advantages:
• HD visual effects: Currently, Turbo HD analog solution is available in two resolutions: 2 megapixels at 1,080P and 1.3 megapixels at 720P. This allows for 900TVL to 1,100TVL of HD quality, which should be able to satisfy most HD surveillance needs.
• Long-distance transmission: It transmits 1,080P over 300 meters via a 75-5 ohm coaxial cable and 720P up to 500 meters.
• Open platform: Hikvision's Turbo HD analog system is compatible with HDTVI products of same type from third party companies. It can also receive different signals from 1,080P network cameras, 960H cameras, and SD analog cameras.
• Reverse control over coaxial cable: There is no need for customize configured keyboards for the OSD function menu of front-end cameras and dome camera cradle controls—everything can be done through the DVR via coaxial cable, providing the same flexibility as network equipment.
• Multi-functions: Software allows IP cameras to have many functions; however, many of these functions are difficult to realize on an analog camera. With the Turbo HD analog system, there are more functions such as transmission through fog, WDR, backlight compensation, and the intelligent analysis of VQD[1].

Product Design
Like other product lines, the Turbo HD analog system is selfcontained. To meet the needs of different customers, it provides a variety of camera series including dome cameras, half-dome cameras, fixed cameras, bullet cameras, integrated cameras, non-spherical camera, etc., all designed with infrared supplementary lighting and are IP66-rated for indoor and outdoor use.

Hikvision also provides several types of Turbo HD DVRs: mainly 4-, 8-, and 16-channel products. From the outside, the Turbo HD DVR looks the same as a traditional DVR. However, once the back cover is opened and you look at the PCB, you will find there are four HDTVI demodulation chips in addition to the video processing chip. In addition, the BNC video input interfaces for the Turbo HD DVR are not separated for SD and HD — the DVR recognizes the signals and resolution after analog video is input though these interfaces. As to DVR, the Turbo HD analog and IP inputs are two individual signals that do not restrict each other. Take DS-8116HQHI-SH as an example. This DVR supports 16 channels of analog video and two channels of network video input and can realize maximum codec storage of 18 channels of 1,080P HD signals.

Product Test
Eight channels with 1,080P and 720P Turbo HD cameras, as well as one channel with a 2-megapixel HD IP cameras, one channel with a D1 HD analog video, and one channel with a 960H camera; 10 channel signals in total were used for the test. They are tested and stored in a DS-8116HQHI-SH VCR (available with eight Western Digital 4TB hard drives). Turbo HD cameras need one-to-one corresponding modem chips to receive video signals. For this test, the camera was connected directly to the DVR. The video was then uploaded to Skyworth's display's DVR HDMI interface and co-browsed through C/S client from an Internet-connected computer.

Image quality test: 1,080P HD Picture Quality
With the DS-2CE16D5T-AVFIT3 as the video source, the camera was aligned at the sharpness testing card and focus at minimum zoom. The observed local output video showed horizontal 1,050TVL and vertical 1,100TVL. The camera's wide-angle lens caused poor edge sharpness, but still provides up to 800TVL. The results were almost the same with 1,080P IP HD, and even better than some 1,000TVL IP HD.

Sharpness Test
With the 24-color reduction test card, the reduction was accurate with no partial color. Compared with IP HD images, the color was more transparent, closer to the color performance of HD-SDI digital signals with codec. At the same time, in the gray scale test, the gray-scale performance at the seventeenth and eighteenth levels were not inferior to IP camera either.

In the scenery image quality test, the pictures were penetrating, smooth, and layered—so much so that you would not believe they came from an analog system. The superior color reduction is closer to that of SDI digital pictures without compression loss.

In addition to the transmission test at short range, we also tested 1,080P at 300 meters over a 75-5 ohm coaxial cable. In the sharpness test, after a 300-meter long transmission, the image quality of 1,080P was not reduced: horizontal 1,050TVL; vertical 1,100TVL; and edge 800TVL were all easily distinguishable with accurate color reduction. Meanwhile, in long-distance transmissions, when placing a telephone next to the coaxial cable and camera to cause signal interference, no abnormalities appeared in the picture.

Network Design With Flexible Controls
Although the Turbo HD analog system uses analog signals to transmit signals, it incorporates Hikvision's network advantages into its new generation of Turbo HD products, such as WDR support, defog, backlight compensation, etc. During the test, a fog simulation test was conducted: when the defog function was off the picture was hazy; however, after turning on the function, the outline of the picture was clear, and the effect on the video in terms of penetration, color, and sharpness was close to that in a no-fog situation. Similarly, in the backlight compensation test, when the backlight compensation was turned on under hard light the ambient light was suppressed as well, making the doll easily identifiable.

In the test, the codec parameter was set for 1,080p video to 1,080P/4 Mbps (under real-time 25fps). HD video was previewed at C/S client-side after codec by DVR (the code rate was steadily controlled between 4.4 to 4.5 Mbps). When delayed, focusing the camera on the electronic stopwatch the delayed time of 1,080P Turbo HD from imaging to display according to DVR local display and photo capture was calculated to be about 170 to 220 milliseconds, proving the fast transmission rate of the picture.

Replay: Fast Operation and Smooth Replay
The DVR also has intelligent analytic functions, such as a tripwire test. It can monitor video channel quality in real time, including diagnostic functions for blurry images, abnormal brightness, and crash screens, as well as immediately preserve the monitor screen.

DVR DS-8116HQHI-SH supports a maximum of 18 channels of video recording and a maximum of 16 channels of 1,080P synchronous replay. After four to five hours of constant recording, video can quickly be retrieved via time and/or channel through the replay menu. For this test we replayed 10 channels: observed was no frame loss in the picture and smooth replay. Note that the image quality, color, and sharpness could fully meet the requirements of HD forensics. In the test, the codec parameter was set for 1,080p video to 1,080P/4 Mbps (under real-time 25fps). HD video was previewed at C/S client-side after codec by DVR (the code rate was steadily controlled between 4.4 to 4.5 Mbps). When delayed, focusing the camera on the electronic stopwatch the delayed time of 1,080P Turbo HD from imaging to display according to DVR local display and photo capture was calculated to be about 170 to 220 milliseconds, proving the fast transmission rate of the picture.

Single channel replay, real-time image quality
During single-channel video replay, we called up the data rate testing software. After a long period of observation, we found that the camera used real-time replay buffer technology of 1,080P real-time replay at about .4 to 4.5 Mbps for singlechannel replay, conforming to codec limits and consistent with those in real-time preview. To reduce storage space and bandwidth pressure in remote preview or replay, 1,080P can be encoded and decoded at a rate of 2 to 3 Mbps or 720P at 1 to 2 Mbps, all while ensuring image quality with DVR low-coding technology. There is no obvious decay of image quality between low-code stream and standard-code stream transmission.

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