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Bosch provides one-stop security solution to Yves Rocher in Thai

Bosch provides one-stop security solution to Yves Rocher in Thai

Editor / Provider: Bosch | Updated: 8/21/2014 | Article type: Commercial Markets

Bosch video surveillance solutions are now installed across all Yves Rocher outlets in Thailand. Yves Rocher, a leading global cosmetic and beauty brand that is rapidly expanding in Thailand has entrusted Bosch to keep their outlets across the country, safe and secure with our video surveillance solutions. Working with Bosch partner, CCTV Thailand, a video surveillance system was installed to allow central monitoring of all Yves Rocher outlets.

Each outlet is approximately 24 square meters and is installed with 4 indoor dome cameras. The Bosch VDC-260 cameras are used in each outlet to monitor the cashier, entrance and display shelves. The cameras are connected to a Bosch DVR-480 recording unit that enables real-time digital recording.

Footage from the DVR is centrally monitored with the Bosch Video Client (BVC). The BVC is simple to install, configure and intuitive to use and is ideal for applications such as retail stores like Yves Rocher. This software allows Yves Rocher's security team to view images from multiple cameras on a single PC monitor and easily archive video clips. BVC displays live video from up to 20 standard and high definition cameras simultaneously.

With the Bosch video surveillance system keeping their existing 50 outlets secure and well monitored, Yves Rocher plans to equip their future outlets with the same solution which is easy to maintain and monitor centrally. In addition, the 3-year warranty and efficient after sales follow up gives them peace of mind to focus on their core business without worrying about store security.

*     A one-stop video surveillance solution to monitor Yves Rocher outlets across Thailand

* Excellent image resolution and digital video recording that enables precision monitoring at all outlets

* Flexible viewing options via the Bosch video client maximizes the efficiency of security monitoring

Samsung Techwin Beyond 1280H offers 1000TVL recording with analog systems

Samsung Techwin Beyond 1280H offers 1000TVL recording with analog systems

Editor / Provider: Samsung Techwin | Updated: 8/20/2014 | Article type: Security 50

Samsung Techwin's new Beyond 1280H series of 1000 TV Lines analogue cameras are equipped as standard with a long list of innovative and technically advanced features which until now, users might have only expected to see built into IP network cameras.

To ensure that customers can gain maximum benefit from the outstanding quality images captured by the eight new analogue models, Samsung Techwin has also introduced new high performance 4, 8 and 16 channel Beyond DVRs which can simultaneously record the extremely high quality 1000 TV lines images in real time across all their channels.

“We have introduced the new Beyond 1280H series of analogue cameras and DVRs in support of those many thousands of CCTV users across Europe who want to cost effectively extend the life of their existing analogue systems,” said Tim Biddulph, Product Manager for the Security Solution division of Samsung Techwin Europe Ltd. “Whilst widespread adoption of video over IP is inevitable, there is nevertheless an almost countless number of existing analogue CCTV systems which are working satisfactorily. End-users may however now need identification grade images which their existing analogue cameras cannot deliver. The good news is that the Beyond series is fully interoperable with current, existing and legacy analogue systems.”

Many of the new highly competitively priced models feature enhanced Wide Dynamic Range which, with performance greater than 120dB, can accurately produce images in scenes that simultaneously contain very bright and very dark areas. They are also equipped with SSNR IV, Samsung Techwin's new generation of noise reduction technology, to deliver high resolution images in night time conditions without any smear or “ghosting”. Other key features include various forms of video analytics, and defog which can improve the clarity of images captured in poor weather conditions such as rain, smoke or fog.

Beyond DVRs
In addition to the Beyond 4 channel SRD-476D, 8 channel SRD-876D and 16 channel SRD-1676D, which can all record 1000 TV lines images in real time across all of their channels, Samsung Techwin has also introduced the 16 channel SRD-1656D, which has the ability to record in real time, CIF quality images captured by connected cameras. De-Interlace support on each channel ensures sharp, accurate display of still images.

All four new Beyond DVRs, which have a single channel audio output, offer the flexibility to separately configure each of their channels to make best use of the available storage capacity by enabling users to set the specific image quality/resolution required for each camera location. With the exception of the 4 channel SRD-476D which has a single internal HDD, the Beyond series of DVRS have four internal SATA HDDs and each provide the option for extra video storage via two external SATA ports.

The Beyond DVRs benefit from a new ultra user friendly GUI (Graphical User Interface) and offer authorised users the option to remotely view live or recorded video from a PC or any Android or IOS supported smartphone or tablet via Samsung Techwin's license-free SSM, SmartViewer or iPOLiS Mobile monitoring software. A built-in web viewer offers enhanced compatibility via Chrome, Explorer and Safari.

The new cameras and domes in the Beyond 1280H series are:
* SCB-5003 WDR 1280H bodied camera
* SCB-5000 1280H bodied camera
* SCD-5083 WDR 1280H Dome Camera
* SCD-5080 1280H Dome Camera
* SCV-5083 1280H WDR Vandal-Resistant Dome Camera
* SCV-5080 1280H Vandal-Resistant Dome Camera
* SCD-5083R 1280H WDR IR Dome Camera
* SCV-5083R Vandal-Resistant WDR IR Dome Camera

Collectively the first eight new models are designed to offer solutions for a wide range of applications and environments from offices, retail stores, schools and hospitals and warehouses, to more challenging environments such as airports, ports, transport facilities, car parks and town centres.

LAX extends incident management with NICE Situator web app

LAX extends incident management with NICE Situator web app

Editor / Provider: NICE Systems | Updated: 8/18/2014 | Article type: Security 50

NICE Systems and AECOM Technology Corporation announced that they are helping Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) extend its situation management capabilities from the control room to the field. The airport deployed the NICE Situator Enterprise Geographical Information System (EGIS) Web application, which enables field personnel to view on their tablets all open security and operational incidents in Situator and log new incidents. This creates a shared environment for managing incidents, leading to better collaboration between teams, increased situational awareness for all operators and more-effective responses.

The Web application uses the sophisticated geospatial and mapping capabilities of Esri's ArcGIS Server to provide customized, layered views of airport buildings, property and infrastructure. All relevant incident stakeholders can visualize the same incident on a map and engage in interactive dialogue via the comments log. They can also share response plans, like an evacuation route, by drawing on the map, annotating it and saving it to the system.

The Web application will also help field operators more efficiently manage day-to-day tasks, such as Federal Aviation Administration-mandated Part 139 airfield inspections. Under Federal Aviation Regulations Part 139, United States commercial service airports are required to conduct various assessments of each runway; examine pavement markings, lighting, signs and safety areas; and oversee ground vehicle operations. If an issue arises, field operators can easily create a new incident on their mobile devices, which is resolved through Situator's workflows and recorded for compliance purposes.

Part of the Los Angeles World Airports, LAX has been using NICE Situator since 2011 to integrate information from various security and operational systems, like video surveillance, CCTV and access control, as well as to generate automated, adaptive response plans. With the Web application, first responders and field operations personnel receive all information from Situator in real time. They can immediately pull up assets in an impact zone – for instance, a video camera within 100 feet of the incident – or use the application's robust search engine to search for nearby geospatial assets, like the exits closest to an incident location. They can also create new incidents, manage ongoing ones and complete specific tasks assigned to them, reducing reliance on radio communications and enhancing compliance.

Dominic Nessi, Deputy Executive Director/Chief Information Officer at Los Angeles World Airports
“The NICE-AECOM solution is allowing us to transform the way we manage safety, security, and operations at LAX. Based on our ongoing success with NICE Situator, we sought a way to apply these capabilities to our field operations. Now, not only are we able to maximize the use of our existing PSIM, situation management and GIS technologies, we are strengthening our entire security and operations apparatus.”

Kevin Carlson, Vice President, Aviation Systems, AECOM
“We are excited to partner with NICE to bring this unique solution to LAX, and to help fulfill the airport's vision for real-time interactive dialogue and collaboration. By combining an airport's EGIS infrastructure with an enterprise situation management platform, organizations can leverage geospatial information for more effective collaboration in support of both daily operations and emergency response.”

Chris Wooten, Executive Vice President, NICE Security Group
“Extending the reach of NICE Situator into the field significantly augments security operations. In a dynamic airport environment like LAX, it is critical to maintain a direct line of communication between multiple users by providing situation management capabilities both inside and outside of the control room. This model for mobile situation management demonstrates NICE's leadership and technology innovation, which can be tailored to the needs of other airports and industries as well.”

NICE's security solutions help organizations capture, analyze and leverage big data to anticipate, manage and mitigate security and safety risks, improve operations, and make the world a safer place. The NICE security, intelligence and cyber offerings provide valuable insights that enable enterprises and governments to take the best action at the right time by correlating structured and unstructured data from multiple sensors and channels, detecting irregular patterns and recognizing trends. NICE Security solutions are used by thousands of customers worldwide, including transportation systems, critical infrastructure, city centers, banks, enterprises and government agencies.

Axis: An eye in the sky with benefit

Axis: An eye in the sky with benefit

Editor / Provider: Ivan Medved, Director Global Business Development AVHS, Axis Communications | Updated: 8/12/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Everything that can become digital will become digital, given the right time. That maxim even applies to the security video recording industry, which traditionally is very conservative in its outlook. Even though digital recording devices have been available for a number of years, a large majority of the security sector still relies on coax analog recording systems to protect their clients' premises or businesses, limited to provide only basic surveillance.

A lot of this mind-set rests with traditional attitudes and a view that ‘good enough' technology will do, just as it always has. But in the era when we have high definition television, Blu-Ray viewing and ultra-sharp images from devices as small as our mobile phones, it is an anachronistic and ‘blurred' way to view the world.

As more and more IT-based industries move solutions to ‘the cloud', the security industry too will provide its benefits and solutions through cloud-based or hosted services. Digital IP camera networks don't just provide the advantage of vastly improved image enhancement, but can provide remote accessibility, enabling multiple, authorized users to view live and recorded video at any time and from virtually any network in the world. This is especially advantageous if users need a third-party company, such as a security firm, to also gain access to the video.

A network video system can grow with a user's needs. IP-based systems provide a means for many network cameras and video encoders, as well as other types of applications, to share the same wired or wireless network for communicating data; so any number of network video cameras can be added to a system without significant or costly changes to the network infrastructure.

As a result, the IP-based surveillance system typically has a lower cost of ownership than a traditional analog CCTV system. An IP network infrastructure is often already in place that a networked video application can piggyback of the existing network. IP-based networks and wireless options are much less expensive alternatives than traditional coaxial and fiber cabling for an analog CCTV system.

Hosted services
The benefits with IP-based surveillance system allow security operators to provide hosted video services – known by a host of acronyms including Video Surveillance as a Service (VSaaS), or Managed Video as a Service (MVaaS). Whatever moniker you may wish to put on it, it comes down to the same thing - service providers can now provide additional ‘cloud-based' services, adding value that would not be possible with a local installation.

Many companies are now embracing the concept - from small businesses, retailers, IT providers and consumers, we are all becoming more and more comfortable with using data stored ‘in the cloud'. IMS Research* reported a bright future for Video Surveillance as a Service (VSaaS) throughout 2012 and beyond, with the market growing by around 20% to 30% a year. If we consider that we already use cloud services for, such as online banking, data backup, web-based email, or photo file sharing, then it becomes apparent that we are more and more ready to accept cloud based services, even if we don't immediately recognize it.

For security purposes, business users can now lease hosted services and choose the parts they need. They don't need a big initial investment, but just pay a monthly fee for a subscription to a service. Neither do they need to be experts on the solution, nor can leverage their installers' expertise and competence to gain an optimized solution for their business.

The hosted service provides additional security and remote storage and remote monitoring. Business management functions can also be enhanced. Users can subscribe to operational services or applications such as heat mapping or people counting or virtual guard tour. As the whole system is scalable, an IP-based system can help grow their business and with their business.

The IT reseller also gains a number of up-front benefits. The hosted VSaaS solution provides them with new business streams – as it is easy to install and configure, they have the opportunity to tie up their customers to monthly subscription models. The small or medium sized business customer doesn't need to take-on large capital-investment projects, but can easily contract and service with configurable programme, choosing the optimum number of cameras, resolution and storage.

They can also bring all the channels together with other IT-based services and cloud-based solutions. They system grows easily with their business and is independent of the location, whether it be spread across several sites, old premises or new.

Potentially the opportunities for service providers are high. Additional services can be added to their existing customer offer, allowing them to generate new revenue streams. Suddenly their customers will have the ability to record and store security information remotely, but yet gain access to it whenever and wherever they want it, and from whatever kind of device they are using. They could be at a remote office, at home, or even on the beach, and can view a security recording from last week or even ‘live'. They can access that using a PC, laptop, tablet, or a mobile phone, and access images from premises that are maybe hundreds of miles away. And it will be safe from hackers, theft, IT failures, fire or vandalism. All of this can be offered as a premium service which drives extra revenue towards hosted service providers. In addition to traditional security services the customer will have the possibility to benefit from new services to further develop and protect their business such as remote guard tour and guard-force services as well as business management services such as drive thru, promotions, daily deliveries and cash protection.

An Eye in the Sky
For many, trusting a third party provider to look after their physical data and security is a hurdle to overcome. As a basic provision, any IP-based security device should have the multi-level passwords, SSL encryption, VPNs and firewalls to protect it from external attack. In addition, all the compliance regulations met by the big data storage players apply to video surveillance hosting providers, including SAS70, RAS Encryption and ISO 27000-1.

In short, using a cloud-based provider is, in many ways, more secure than the traditional analog system as there's no physical recording equipment available to steal or on-site video evidence to destroy.

For any small business with sufficient bandwidth that needs a small number of cameras to protect vital areas, such as common entrances or business-critical areas, an IP-based system is ideal. Businesses will find IP-based security cameras simple enough to install themselves, and can buy surveillance and other services from a provider. Any company with less than 10 employees, with leased-office space, and with an internet connection will find the solution ideal for their needs.

Installation is also simple and easy. A video hosting system takes around 15 minutes to connect to a web hosting service with an IP provider. Users don't need to be IT experts to get up and running, and any initial system costs are easily reduced by removing local management and storage costs.

For those users with existing analog systems, there is no need to replace the entire investment. For example Axis Communications provides a full range of video encoders which are able to convert analog systems to digital. Additional networked storage devices can store recordings and events to save bandwidth and increase system performance. This means, solutions are scalable and costs are controllable and as users go through the growth curve, so can their response to networked solutions.

Many of the doubts regarding access and reliability are being eroded as more and more companies join cloud based networks, and especially as back-up systems such as Network Attached Storage (NAS) devices are available to back up video streams if a network goes down or increase performance if bandwidth is limited, allowing the user to watch and record high-quality video in HDTV definition.

Like everything in modern life, technology and solutions advance and evolve. Hosted systems provide a remote yet intelligent solution to users' needs. Compared with a traditional analog installation, hosted video will provide not only traditional monitoring and recording, it will serve as a platform to provide new possibilities to effectively manage a business, allowing the customers to subscribe from wide range of new video based services. Other than surveillance a hosted camera can be used to remotely verify deliveries or false alarms, count the number of people in a store or be used to follow-up promotional activities. The possibility for the video service provider to physically send staff to the customers store if needed also provides new level of security. The subscription based model puts the user in control and allow him to benefit from services to more effectively handle his business.

---By Ivan Medved, Director Global Business Development AVHS, Axis Communications

Thermal imaging cameras: A cost-effective solution for perimeter protection

Thermal imaging cameras: A cost-effective solution for perimeter protection

Editor / Provider: Sponsored by FLIR | Updated: 8/11/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Today, the challenge for CCTV professionals is to make sure that video footage is effective on a 24/7 basis, 365 days a year. Securing an area during the daytime is one thing. But what happens during the night? And in weather conditions like fog, rain and snow? What can be detected if CCTV cameras are blinded by the sun?

As CCTV systems become more advanced, the security industry will increasingly focus on CCTV installations for 24 hour surveillance, not just day-time operation. To be truly secure, a site must be protected day and night.

A number of tools are available to help detect potential intruders in the dark. Often different technologies are being combined to create a secure perimeter. Fences can be complemented with Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) systems with or without active infrared illumination or old fashioned light bulbs, Radio Frequency Intruder Detection (RAFID) systems, thermal imaging cameras and/or walking patrols. Whatever solution or technology is chosen for securing an area, they all have their advantages and disadvantages and some technologies are more expensive than others. To get a full picture of the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) for a certain solution, not only the initial purchase cost, but also the installation and maintenance costs need to be considered. Some solutions consume a lot of power and need a lot of spare parts. Environmental and energy consumption issues are high on the global agenda today. Given that $1 from every $5 spent globally is used on lighting, and much of this is spent on inefficient and unnecessary lighting, particular attention should be paid to this area. Saving energy by looking at running costs will become increasingly important. Local authorities and private industries are all looking at methods to save energy costs and lighting is one area that will receive due attention.

Quite a number of technologies are available to help detect potential intruders in the dark before they become a real hazard. Let's compare some of them:

The total cost of seeing at night

Closed-circuit television (CCTV) combined with traditional lighting
CCTV systems have been an effective tool for security and surveillance applications. However, just like the human eye, CCTV cameras do not see too much in total darkness. So in order to detect intruders at night they are often complemented with traditional lights by mains driven bulbs. Although some bulbs (fluorescent lamps, HID lamps) are more efficient than others, the operational cost remains very high. Light can only penetrate a certain distance and completely illuminating an area, so that it can be kept under surveillance of CCTV cameras, is not always possible. Powering and maintaining the lights can even be more costly.

CCTVs with traditional lamp lighting require lamp replacement every 2,000 to 4,000 hours or about every 8 months. Significant labour and material costs are associated with lamp replacement. Light pollution is a global problem caused by inefficient, intrusive and unnecessary use of artificial light. Symptoms include glare, clutter over-illumination and sky glow. Light pollution is an increasingly hot political topic given recent government legislation to control and punish light pollution. In some locations light is also considered to be too intrusive.

Furthermore, lighting essentially lays out a route of attack for intruders, creating shadows in which they can hide and access undetected.

Closed-circuit television (CCTV) combined with LEDs
Compared to any bulb, LEDs provide significant savings on electrical consumption. LEDs also provide long life performance with little ongoing maintenance costs.
Infrared illumination with LEDs, sometimes also called active infrared, beams infrared radiation into the area in front of a camera. The LEDs are often placed around the lens of the camera.
LED illumination is compromised by limited range performance. Also, providing lighting for domes has long been a challenge for CCTV professionals as the lighting cannot be fitted to move with the camera.

Electrified fences
In order to keep intruders out of certain areas, fences can be constructed. To further increase security, fences can be equipped with sensors that generate an automatic alarm when someone touches the fence. Or they can be electrified, to keep intruders away.
In all cases, fences need to be complemented, for example by CCTV cameras or walking patrols in order to see what is happening around the fence.

Radio Frequency Intruder detection (RAFID)
The simplest description of RAFID is to consider a system using two specially designed cables – one transmitting a radio wave, while the other receives that wave.
Changes in the amount of signal passing between the transmitter cable and receiver cable are analyzed by a signal processor. These changes indicate that someone or something is between the two cables, which will make an alarm go off. Due to the difference in signal strength, the system can detect whether these changes are due to the presence of a human, or a small animal. Note that in a lot of cases CCTV cameras still need to be installed in order to see what is generating a real, or false, alarm.

Thermal imaging 
A new tool for seeing in total darkness, and in extreme weather conditions, is thermal imaging. Thermal imaging is the use of a thermal imaging camera to "see" thermal energy emitted from an object. Thermal imaging cameras produce images of invisible infrared or "heat" radiation. Based on temperature differences between objects, thermal imaging produces a crisp image on which the smallest of details can be seen. They work both during daytime and nighttime. Thermal imaging is today widely recognized as the most effective detection solution and when used in conjunction with video analytics it is confirmed having the lowest false alarm rate and most accurate intrusion detection solution in the market.

Most FLIR Systems thermal imaging cameras contain an uncooled Vanadium Oxide detector. Not only does this produce excellent quality thermal images, since it is not containing any moving parts, it needs virtually no maintenance. Thermal imaging technology requires no additional lighting or illumination and has no regular maintenance costs. The FC series camera is now available with it's own onboard analytics, this creating a true edge detection device , both benefits of Thermal imaging and Video analytics are housed in the same camera.

Deciding which technology to use

Before making a final decision about which technology will be implemented to secure a perimeter at night, security managers should have a look at the advantages and disadvantages of each technology. This is outlined in the table below.  

 

Advantages

Disadvantages

CCTV with traditional

lighting or LED

- Good visibility during daytime

- Relatively low initial cost

- A lot of cameras need to be installed to cover a large perimeter

- Limited detection at night. Light illuminates only certain small area.

- Limited capabilities in fog, rain,

- Civil works need to be carried out to install light poles

- High power consumption

- High maintenance cost for replacing the lights: material and manpower

Electrified Fence

- Creates a physical barrier

- Allows to stop intruders

- Works during the night as well

- High installation cost

- Full civil works needed

- Power consumption

- Needs to be complemented with CCTV to see if alarm is false or not.

Light or infrared illumination needed during the night to do this.

RAFID or Sensor Cable

- Fully automated system

- Works in total darkness

- High installation cost

- Full civil works needed

- Troubleshooting and maintenance after installation

- Many unwanted alarms

- Needs to be complemented with CCTV to see if alarm is false or not.

Light or infrared illumination needed during the night to do this.

Thermal imaging

- Full awareness

- Can be used day and night

- Works in practically all weather conditions.

Can see through light fog, rain, smoke, ...

- No downtime, low maintenance

- Low power consumption

- Extremely difficult to hide from since thermal contrast is practically impossible to mask

-Excellent cueing sensor for high powered zoom PANT TILT SYSTEMS

- No physical barrier

- Potential intruders are easily spotted but not identified

Case study : lower investment for thermal imaging
As is shown in the advantages and disadvantages table on the previous page, thermal imaging cameras have many advantages for perimeter protection. To make a final decision, however, the purchase cost of the system needs to be considered. Below you'll find a comparison between the required number of units for perimeter protection systems based on CCTV cameras versus systems based on thermal imaging cameras. In this simplified example, the cost of personnel and equipment during the installation and the cost in maintenance and power bills are not included, as they might vary strongly depending on available infrastructure, local power rates and local wages. In all cases these costs will be directly proportional to the amount of equipment and on the usage of lighting. Even though the price of one single thermal imaging camera might be higher than the price of a CCTV camera, the overall investment costs for a thermal imaging camera perimeter protection system is actually lower, in this case 28% lower. The larger the perimeter, the bigger this difference will become. Since thermal imaging cameras require no lighting to function and given the fact that fewer cameras are needed with the thermal imaging perimeter protection solution, this system will also consume less electricity than the CCTV solution, making the thermal solution less expensive in its upkeep than the CCTV solution.

Assumptions:
- An industrial perimeter of 700 meters needs to be protected with the perimeter protection system.
- The perimeter needs to be secured day and night, in all weather conditions. This means that CCTV cameras are limited in terms of distance that can be covered by the infrared illuminators.

Even though the price of one single thermal imaging camera is higher than the price of a CCTV camera, in this example the total investment costs for a thermal imaging camera perimeter protection system is 38% lower.

Conclusion
Although all technologies have advantages and disadvantages a small calculation makes it clear that thermal imaging is a very good and a very cost effective solution for protecting a perimeter, especially if this perimeter, like in practically all cases, also needs to be protected during the night.
In this technical note, we have demonstrated that for thermal imaging systems, not only maintenance costs are lower (power, spare parts, etc.), but already the initial purchase cost of a thermal system is lower than a CCTV system.

Although a single thermal imaging camera is more expensive than a CCTV camera, fewer cameras need to be deployed to cover the same area. The civil works that need to be carried out are minimal. In some cases, the cameras can even be mounted on existing structures. Furthermore, since thermal imaging cameras produce a clear image in the darkest of nights, no complementary technologies like lighting or infrared illuminators need to be installed. Not only does this limit the amount of civil works that needs to be carried out, it also reduces the maintenance cost.

Thermal imaging cameras also generate fewer false alarms which is a common problem with CCTV cameras combined with Video Motion Detection or Video Content Analysis software.

 

 

IDIS and Security Supplies sign distribution agreement

IDIS and Security Supplies sign distribution agreement

Editor / Provider: IDIS | Updated: 8/8/2014 | Article type: Security 50

IDIS and Security Supplies, have signed a strategic partnership that sees the independent security systems distributor offering IDIS DirectIP, the award-winning, full-HD surveillance solution, through its network of branches in the UK.

The announcement follows DirectIP training for over 20 installers hosted at Security Supplies headquarters last month. The IDIS technical team demonstrated DirectIP as the perfect solution for installers to upgrade their customers from legacy analogue CCTV to high definition (HD) surveillance, without the complexity often associated with many IP systems. Featuring plug-and-play implementation coupled with high-performance technology, DirectIP eliminates the need for IP addressing and a deep knowledge of networks, to offer a cost effective networked and HD surveillance solution that can be deployed in hours.

Under the partnership agreement, Security Supplies combines its thirteen year track record and extensive industry knowledge, with dedicated and expert DirectIP sales and technical support across a range of security projects from surveillance upgrades through to highly integrated security solutions.

Martin Cowley, Channel Manager at IDIS Europe, said, “We recognised Security Supplies extensive surveillance expertise coupled with a bespoke customer support model. The agreement indicates the start of a long-term relationship to support installers and integrators from system design and project delivery through to on-going maintenance and support.”

Chris Davis, Managing Director of Security Supplies, added, “IDIS DirectIP simplifies the security buying chain by offering everything our installers need to build a full-HD and networked surveillance solution. The simplicity of installation combined with industry-leading image quality continues to impress both our installation partners and their end user customers.”

Invest in Russian security market – things need to know

Invest in Russian security market – things need to know

Editor / Provider: Michelle Chu | Updated: 8/7/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

Groteck Business Media, the leading B2B publisher and event organizer that has been serving security, telecom, IT, and broadcasting in Russian market, today co-hosts a seminar with Messe Frankfurt New Era in Taipei, Taiwan, talking about current Russian security market. Andrey Miroshkin, the CEO and owner of Groteck Business Media, and Olga Inshakova, Project Director of Groteck Business Media, presented a full aspect of current Russian market trend and a series of professional suggestions in terms of investing in this market.

Russian security market is forecast to keep growing in the following years, as several major international events such as 2016 IIHF World Championship and 2018 FIFA World Cup are coming up in Russia. Meanwhile, the government in Russia has highly focused on safe city and transportation security projects, whereas global security suppliers has targeted their market strategies on verticals more than usual.

CCTV and video surveillance devices and access control systems will still be taking up the largest proportion of imported security products in Russian market. While premium security systems imported to Russia are mainly manufactured by the U.S., European countries (GB, Germany, France, Italy, and Poland), Japan, and Israel, the component and systems equipped in these systems are mostly originated from China, according to Inshakova'. Interestingly, some hi-tech products in Russian market are mainly provided by Taiwanese, Chinese, and Korean suppliers.

As Miroshkin mentioned in the seminar, there are some basic options for the suppliers who intend to invest in the Russian security market; however, some potential issues need to be considered while making business call. For example, as care-free as it may seem, hiring a distributor cannot be merely about selling and delivering products to the end users. Handling promotion and advertising campaigns through independent local distributors can lead to disappointing outcome, especially when the distributors do not fully understand the investor's product lines and target verticals.

On the other hand, representative office could be a wiser choice. Running business through representative office suggests having better control over both promotion and distribution. However, Russian authorities forbid representative offices directly involved in commercial activities. In order to legally take part in commercial activities, the investors may consider opening branch offices to engage in commercial activities legally in Russia. Educating your customers is crucial in the Russian market, according to Miroshkin. Lacking of informative connection with the customers can easily give the competitors an upper hand. Furthermore, to make sure the promotion worth every penny, the investors need to think Russia-wide, because business works differently from Siberia and from Moscow – that is the reason for hiring more than one professional representative in Russia.

NICE Inform surpassed 3,000 for worldwide deployments

NICE Inform surpassed 3,000 for worldwide deployments

Editor / Provider: NICE Syetem | Updated: 8/5/2014 | Article type: Security 50

NICE Systems announced that it has surpassed a milestone of 3,000 worldwide systems deployed for NICE Inform, the company's flagship solution for managing multimedia incident information. Now in its seventh generation, NICE Inform has been widely adopted by emergency service centers around the globe to consolidate multimedia data for comprehensive analysis and insight. Growing numbers of emergency service centers rely on NICE Inform for investigations, incident debriefing, and quality assurance.

The public safety industry is on the threshold of major transformation as it moves toward Public Safety Broadband, NG9-1-1, and NG112. Next Gen emergency communications will go beyond voice calls, including some combination of voice, text, pictures, and video. Additional data sources – like CCTV, License Plate Recognition (LPR), weather systems, and telematics – will also deliver incident information to emergency service centers. These hubs will need to have the capability to link all of this information together for investigative insight.

The City of Oakland, for example, uses NICE Inform for multiple departments including Police, Fire, Internal Affairs and the Records Division. “With NICE Inform, all of our departments can securely access their own recorded communications, collaborate more effectively, and create comprehensive timelines for incidents involving multi-agency responses, greatly streamlining the process of building a case,” said Ahsan Baig, ITD, City of Oakland. “NICE Inform also gives us a platform to capture and consolidate video, text messaging and other NG9-1-1 communications in the future.”

“As progress toward these initiatives accelerates, we're seeing even greater momentum for NICE Inform,” said Barak Eilam, CEO, NICE. “It's evident that emergency service centers are going to become a touch point for many new sources of data. NICE Inform will be the glue that ties all of this incident information together.”

“NICE Inform was the first-to-market in 2007 and continues to lead,” added Eilam. “Crossing the 3,000 mark is a testament to NICE's success in developing forward-looking solutions that align with public safety trends and address the critical incident management needs of emergency service centers worldwide. We expect interest in NICE Inform to continue to build as emergency service centers prepare for NG9-1-1, NG112 and Public Safety Broadband.”

Australia's security industry

Australia's security industry

Editor / Provider: STEVE CHIN, a&s Asia | Updated: 8/4/2014 | Article type: Hot Topics

In recent times, Australia has developed into a premiere market for the security industry, with both production and manufacturing at new highs. We take a deeper look into the Outback and examine why Australia is such a major player in this industry now.

Australia may be better known for kangaroos, koalas, and deadly animals, but it is actually considered a fully developed country and one of the wealthiest in the world, possessing the world's 12th-largest economy. As of 2013, Australia also had the world's fifth-highest per capita income and the second-highest human development index. It also ranks in the top 10 in many global international comparisons: quality of life, health, education, economic freedom, and the protection of civil liberties and political rights. Indeed, it has come a long way since the days of being a colonized penal colony.

These days, Australia possesses not just a strong technological industry as a whole, but researchers are also predicting continued growth in the Australian region in its security industry as well. Backed up by the fact that the country is arguably the second strongest market in the APAC region after China, Australia is a country that commands respect. Indeed, according to Rocco Palladino, National Sales Manager — Australia and New Zealand for Pacom Systems, “the Australian electronic security industry has continued to steadily develop and increase since 2011. We estimate that the market has grown approximately 2 to 3 percent on average every year since 2011.” However, growth is still relatively slow and stagnant in terms of market figures, especially when compared to other countries in the APAC region, like China and India. Some factors that can be attributed to this stagnant growth include a lack of a well-established infrastructure as well as a highly tech-savvy industry that puts high demands on value from technology.

In point of fact, when looking deeper into Australia's security industry, there are other signs that it has slowed down in terms of growth in the last few years. Because of recent issues regarding the Nationwide Broadband Network (NBN), some controversy has resulted in many security solutionsproviders being affected by its slowdowns in development. Coupled together with the fact that there just is not enough readily available, widespread bandwidth yet — especially outside of major cities, it further complicates the issue when Australia as a whole is trying to faster facilitate the transfer to full digital solutions.

SLOWER THAN EXPECTED IP ROLLOUT
IP infrastructure and a resulting slow adoption of IP-related products. Indeed, analog was still the leader by a significant margin, and the IP infrastructure was slow to develop and catch up to market demands. While by no means fully developed or ready, the IP infrastructure has still made significant leaps and bounds. However, looking at issues like the NBN that was rolled out in Australia in 2011, it's easy to understand why the country is both ambitious but still facing numerous hurdles to cross.

According to a 2014 report published by the Australian government, there are over 1.6 million premises across Australia that either have no access to fixed broadband or very poor quality broadband connectivity. The NBN aims to rectify this. At its core, the NBN is an enormous, large-scale project that is still under development in Australia with rollouts already happening in several trial locations. In practice, it is a national, wholesale-only, open-access data network that is in both fixed line and wireless forms. However, from the beginning, the NBN has been plagued by numerous construction issues and a too overtly ambitious goal. With that said, it is easy to see the numerous hurdles that the NBN still has to overcome. With a cost of nearly US$29 billion, all in public funding needed to tie over construction to 2019, the build cost has also been a huge point in debate. Nevertheless, the NBN still aims to reach approximately 22 percent of all premises in Australia by 2021(which is a huge drop-off).

According to a 2014 report, there are over 1.6 million premises across Australia that still have poor bandwidth access.

The reality, though, is that Australia, like almost all the rest of the major players in the industry, has already begun a gradual adoption of IP and the slow phase-out of analog systems. Australia has come a long way in these three to four years. As Nathan Walters, Sales Engineer for RhinoCo Technology put it, “A few years ago, IP was still a non-starter due to lack of knowledge and experience by integrators. But thanks to numerous companies providing training, there has been an increased uptake. Now, people not only realize the increased benefits of IP over analog, they see it as future proof technology.” He also said that there is evidence of this by the sales of IP equipment rapidly taking over those of analog.

SOLUTIONS TURNING OVER A NEW LEAF
As the Australian security industry looks into the next few years, so too does security solution providers and how they must observe and react to the various changes coming to the country. Of key importance is to keep a continual eye on the status of future NBN rollouts. As was stated before, reactions and feelings towards it have been lukewarm at best, if not outright against it. Furthermore, when it comes to solution providers, some key points to highlight in order to stay in the game are the changes regarding integration and unification across all solutions platforms. As Kobi Ben-Shabat, Founder and MD for OPS explained, “the ability to integrate between multiple systems, video, access controls, license plate recognitions, intruder alarms, and intercoms into a single vendor or a single platform is the trend today.” Another way to look at it would be because of the NBN fiasco, security solutions providers have had to look at other ways to be competitive and stay afloat. By unifying systems into a single platform, it is a way to battle costs and simplicity.

One buzzword floating around is the surge in PSIM solutions. Ben-Shabat elaborated, “we also see the beginning of a demand for PSIM solutions. The rise of the ability to provide single management tools either to the operator or to senior management attractive from customer standpoints. If I was to look towards two, three years, I would see PSIM solutions.” Palladino also same feeling, “another term starting to secure a position in the market is PSIM, although this appears to originate from video management system manufacturers moving into the alarm and access control areas.”

The future of Australia's security industry hinges in a large part on the future of the IP infrastructure.

GOVERNMENT STIMULATION AND HIGH-END SOLUTIONS
While there are usually a number of government stimulus packages that exist in a lot of countries around the world, things have relatively quiet on the Australian front. The one key stimulus to point out is the nationwide rollout of city-wide, street surveillance packages. With the Australian government promising a contribution of $50 million coupled together with local grants from state governments, it is obvious the government has taken notice of the issue of better security and better surveillance. One result to this fairly lackadaisical approach to security is a lack of market for high-end security solutions. Traditionally, a big market for solutions like video analytics, facial recognition, and smart security has always laid in government. However, it is not entirely accurate to state that no market exists either. As Ben-Shabat put it, “I think video analytics when it comes to solutions like facial recognition, the application is mainly at the government level, or when looking at prevention, in retail. The cost requirement is still a factor, when the cost is right, they will accept. I believe it still needs to be more cost efficient and reliable to be successful.” Another direction that high-end security solutions points at lies in retail solutions, in both SMBs and franchises. Again, the cost issue is a big factor, but there exists a market.

Unfortunately, “too many people advertise and supply analytics (or smart security), but unless you are in defense, or perhaps customs, then you really need to ask if you are really able to use it. It is an easy way to differentiate larger more expensive solutions. It is truly something that is requested more than it is used in application,” said Walters.


THE NEXT FEW YEARS

As we look into the next few years, the overall picture of Australia looks to be good. The single, biggest factor in the security industry is definitely reliant on the NBN rollout and how far it can reach.

Palladino put it as, “progress continues with the NBN and this will definitely impact the Australian market, as their rollout progresses. Faster, cheaper communications to more parts of Australia should give rise to more business opportunities for security solutions providers.” Walter also added, “the NBN progressing as quickly as possible will help, and will help ideally fund further R&D innovation in all of Australia.”

Other things to look forward to include the idea of open platforms. As we add in the inclusion of cloud, Australia should also look forwards to more unification across all platforms.

As the IP infrastructure continues to improve, cloud should become far more utilized as the digital world continues to impact the industry. Overall, the future looks bright, so long as the technological advancements don't pull the innovations down and the infrastructure improves.

Growing Potential of HD-over-coaxial Solutions
Another key point to zero in on is the fact that analog is really on its way out the door, albeit slower than people expected. Nathan Walters, Sales Engineer for RhinoCo Technology explained, “Analog TV has recently been turned off in Australia so more and more consumers have had to become familiar with HD, and they have begun to look for this as an essential part of their security solutions.” As a result, one more key area of focus would lie in HD CCTV. As Walters pointed out, CCTV has had a good track record in catching offenders. From a transition point of view, HD-over-coaxial solutions are another great interim technology to look at as solutions providers transition into the digital age. He further explained, “more importantly, it can take existing systems over to HD without replacing the existing analog infrastructure. We expect that as more consumers experience this, they will eventually demand it on future solutions and this will itself ultimately drive the roll out into newer IP systems and continue to drive the security industry itself.”

MOBOTIX system deployed in Gainsborough Academy

MOBOTIX system deployed in Gainsborough Academy

Editor / Provider: MOBOTIX | Updated: 8/1/2014 | Article type: Education

The Gainsborough Academy – previously known as Trent Valley Academy – opened in September of 2008 as a mainstream school created by the merger of two existing secondary schools and the creation of a brand new purpose built facility in Corringham Road, Gainsborough. The Academy has two areas of specialism – Performing Arts and Technology, both of which are exceptionally well-resourced.

The Academy's facilities include its own purpose-built Theatre, a TV and radio station, a suite of Apple Mac computers, and CADCAM design equipment facilities which are used for the benefit of all students and also to enable work with the local community.

In 2009, The Gainsborough Academy opened its main four storeys, 15000 square metre building set at the heart of the 12 hectare site. The purpose built facility is attended by just over 1000 pupils, staff and guests each day and is a US $59 (£35 million) project.

Although a magnificent learning environment, when Andy Smith was appointed as Facilities Manager to the Academy in 2009, he felt that there were some clear deficiencies in the site security arrangements, especially around the prevention of anti-social behaviour with the aim of protecting both pupils and staff.

The existing 6 Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) analogue cameras offered poor quality images and covered very little of the active parts of the campus. The requirement to manually shift viewpoints also required a skilled and constantly alert operator which did not fit well within a school environment.

So Smith approached Proxis, a highly regarded security specialist that had successfully installed effective CCTV solutions at several leading schools including Minsthorpe Community College and Bingley Grammar School. Following a detailed risk assessment and site survey, it was decided that an initial 12 MOBOTIX cameras would provide base line security covering high traffic areas within the campus. The initial installation would also allow senior Academy managers to understand the capabilities of a mega-pixel and in some cases fully hemispheric camera with the ability to cover an entire room with just a single ceiling mounted, 360 degree “fish eye” lens.

Decentralised Technology Simplifies Management
MOBOTIX is the pioneer of a decentralised approach to CCTV which simplifies installation and operational considerations while improving overall security and reliability. In this decentralisation architecture, all image processing, recording logic and decisions are made in the camera itself. This is in complete contrast to most other CCTV systems, where the camera typically has no real intelligence and relies on decision making and image video within the device and only needs to send video to a central repository at the discretion of the operator, building owners no longer require an expensive and complex monitoring station or dedicated wiring across the site. The installation proved an unobtrusive but eff ective method of monitoring a wider area with both video and sound to help create a safer environment. All video is accessible quickly using the MOBOTIX Control Centre software from any authorised PC within the school, while footage is held securely indexed on fully redundant NAS servers for an extended period of time.

The initial pilot project was welcomed and quickly expanded to an additional 14 cameras to cover the inside of the school in corridors, lunchroom, locker and recreation areas. “The installation of MOBOTIX was a light bulb moment for many of the senior staff ,” explains Smith, “Many hadn't realised what can be achieved with a static camera and how few are needed to cover a large area.” “Members of staff dealing with disciplinary matters were highly impressed with the system and once a few incidents had occurred, which were successfully dealt with due to the evidence provided by the MOBOTIX system, word got out amongst the students and discipline improved greatly,” says Smith.

Total Coverage with Fewer Cameras
In total, 99% of the site is monitored by 47 discreet MOBOTIX CCTV systems which blend into the décor as devices similar to smoke detectors. In the last few years, the Academy has upgraded its external cameras to MOBOTIX giving it full visibility over car park areas down to the ability to recognise individual car registration numbers. Smith believes that the school which has few instances of bullying, vandalism or aggressive behaviour is able to act far more eff ectively to any incident with the backing of high quality CCTV images.

Smith highlights the use of the Q24 hemispheric camera within the Academy, “For example, with these cameras installed in a locker area, we can ensure that there is nowhere any one can hide and it does prevent bullying. To look back at an incident the user can then zoom in and navigate around the room seeing everything.”

The reliability of the MOBOTIX solution, which uses no moving parts, has meant the Academy has suffered no CCTV failures over the last four years. “The project has been a tremendous success for us,” says Smith, “While Proxis has delivered on time and to budget with their normal level of professionalism and expertise that has allowed us to do more with far fewer cameras than was ever thought possible,” Smith concludes.

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